www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

July 25, 2017, 8:30 AM EDT



Good Sized Offshore Fish That Had to be Released

The two pictures above were taken on the July 11, 2017 SOFT (special offshore fishing trip). The shot on the left is a digital image of Neil Feldman (NJ) holding his 28 pound cod before releasing this fish alive. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest cod of the season as of this writing. And it was nearly the largest cod he has ever caught. At the time of the catch, the Federal law states that no cod shall be taken by recreational anglers. The shot on the right shows Bob MacNeil (NH) holding is 34 pound halibut just before releasing it. The shot was taken with Bob holding the underside of the fish towards me. Because I wanted to keep the halibut alive, I sacrificed taking the time to make a better picture. In other words, the fish looks smaller than it was. We couldn't keep the halibut even though it was forty-two inches long (of legal length) because we had already landed one of 38 pounds by 6:00 AM, Neil's other good fish! The law reads that recreational fishing vessels can not keep more than one halibut per trip. But, as most anglers know, it's not so much the keeping of the fish but the catching of the fish that is most fun. And getting a picture of proof can be the best part!




Expected Regulations for the 2017 Bunny Clark Fishing Season

For the foreseeable future, the Federal saltwater recreational fishing regulations will remain the same as they were last year starting on May 1, 2017. So this means that we will still have the fifteen haddock bag limit with a minimum retention size of seventeen inches. Also, last years rules also included a bag limit of one cod per person starting in August and ending at the end of September. However, the National Marine Fisheries Service is preparing a proposed new rule (new regulations) soliciting comments on new measures recommended by the New England Fishery Management Council. Once the proposed rule is out, more information will be available. I suspect that a new set of regulations will be in place by the time August rolls around or before the time we get a chance to keep a cod. But I don't know this for fact. The wheels of government turn slowly. Stay tuned.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, there was much less humidity, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew mostly out of the west and then northwest. Wind speeds were in the fifteen knot range most of the day. The sky was mostly clear with a bright sun. There was less humidity all day. The highest air temperature I saw was 82F in Perkins Cove. But the lack of humidity made it a perfect day. The visibility remained very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots in the morning and ten to fifteen knots in the afternoon. Seas were about two feet overall in kind of a chop/swell deal. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good overall. Most good sized fish caught were cod. There were one hundred and forty-six cod caught and released from 5 to 12 pounds. This is the most market cod we have seen in a week. Most legal fish landed were pollock, followed closely by haddock. Legal landings also included eight cusk and twenty-four mackerel. Released fish included the same number of haddock that were kept and the most dogfish we have seen this season so far, on one trip, with a count of forty-seven. They drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well. It didn't matter what you used; there was plenty of action.

The were fishing peacefully for quite a while as a sailboat, a sloop, bore down on them from the southwest. The boat was far enough away that Ian didn't pay attention. It became evident after a while that the sailboat was not going to change course and, in fact, was on a collision course with the Bunny Clark. The anglers started yelling as Ian ran to the helm to start the engine and put it in gear to get out of the way. Ian avoided a collision, but only barely. The sailboat had a light blue colored hull and was named the Noonin. The name was on the bow, which is unusual for a sailboat. He couldn't see the hailing port. And, from what I understand, the sail set was "wing & wing", going directly to leeward. There was no one at the helm until the last minute when someone showed up coming out of the companionway. I asked if he was fully clothed, all kinds of thoughts running through my head. And I guess he was. I would have given him the nod if he were half dressed. But fully dressed, that's just plain dumb seamanship!

Ian didn't mention who was high hook. Matt Savarie (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by John Lambert, Jr. (NY). Rene Poirier (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Wood (NY) caught the first fish to weigh, a 10.5 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Brien Bachon (NY) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Ben Armstrong (MA) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his best. Ben also landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer and for getting quite a few tangles.

I received two donations sponsoring me in Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. One was a very generous donation of $250.00 from Hank/Henry Lapa (MA). I used to take his brother, Mitch, fishing with me all the time. Mitch liked the marathon trips. The other was a $40.00 donation from Bob Munroe & Linda Burgess (MA). Thank you all so very much for your help and generosity. I very much appreciate your support!

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had very light southwest winds on the ride to the fishing grounds. Seas were chops of less than a foot, calm in places. The sky was clear, the visibility was very good, the air temperature was mild and there was no sea swell to speak of.

On the grounds, the wind stayed out of the southwest almost the whole day. I said almost because we did have a light westerly wind for a short time on the morning. Wind speeds were around five knots or less for most of the morning with a maximum chop of a foot. Mostly it was less or calm. After noon, the southwest wind picked up to almost fifteen knots. Seas increased to two feet in chops. This wind backed off to ten knots or less on the ride home. Seas were no more than a foot. The sky was clear in the morning, mostly cloudy after noon. The visibility ranged to thirty miles, at least. The air temperature reached a high of 66F in the shade. The tide (current) was strong for most of the day, moderate in the late afternoon.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.3F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was good (tide) in the morning and very good in the afternoon. Catching was very good. To qualify that statement, most fish hooked, by far, were not legal fish. But it was almost a fish a cast all day. Landings were fair to good. If we could have kept cod over twenty-four inches, landings would have been good or better than that. Most fish caught were a large number of sub-legal haddock, cod, mackerel and dogfish. We saw/caught more dogfish today than any other trip this season so far. It was hard to say exactly but Ian thought that it was at least twice as many as yesterday's trip. It was probably three times that and just before the point of being unmanageable. Most legal fish landed were haddock, the most haddock we have landed for at least a couple of weeks. But haddock don't fill boxes (the qualifications to categorize a day as good, bad or excellent). Legal landings also included thirty-four pollock, two redfish, six cusk, a cunner and a ton of mackerel. The mackerel we so thick in places, cod flies had a hard time making it to bottom without hooking one! Released fish, besides cod, included two wolffish and one porbeagle shark. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

The qualifications for high hook can be a bit murky when you don't consider cod as a legal fish. So it was hard for me to come up with the angler who caught the most good sized fish. There was just too much going on all the time. Chris Deschambault (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.25 pound pollock. This is the fourth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I took a picture of Chris with his prize fish. This digital image appears on the right. I didn't weigh his largest cod but it looked to be about 9 pounds. Rachael Seitz (PA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 10.25 pound pollock. She also tied for the third largest fish with Gary Holt (VT). Both anglers landed three 10 pound fish between them. Gary caught two pollock of 10 pounds each while Rachael released a 10 pound cod. Racheal also caught the largest of the two wolffish with one that weighed 9.5 pounds and she caught another cod of 9.25 pounds. Gary caught the largest haddock of the day at 4.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: "Haddock Jack" Brouse (NH) caught the most cusk with a count of three but did not catch the most haddock today even though his count was probably ten legal fish. His largest fish was a 9 pound cod. Joe Columbus (MA) caught a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish. Gina Brooks (VT) landed the hard luck award today for having to put up with Cliff' Crandall's tangles all day long!

I received several donations sponsoring me in my bicycle ride for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The anglers and their donations are as follows: Tom Dwyer (CT) for $60.00, Rob & Beth Bentley (ME) for $40.00 - in memory of Dorothy Merrill, Clint Crandall (CT) for $50.00 and Cliff Crandall (CT) for $60.00. Thank you all so very much for your generosity and kindness. I really appreciate your help and support in this endeavor!

Friday, June 23, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the spring annual Gene Jablonski (all New York) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly cloudy, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good at least. Ashore, the wind stayed very light all day. In fact, the ocean was flat calm along the shore. I could hear the bell buoy all morning and some of the afternoon, leading one to believe that the air was coming out of the east. Near 5:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the south and blew up to fifteen knots or better. By 9:00 AM, the southerly was blowing a sustained twenty knots. The air temperature was perfect today. I saw a high of 76F in Perkins Cove. The visibility was good at best most of the day. It was hazy with some fog. Around 2:45 PM, the fog rolled in to Perkins Cove and hung out here for the better part of an hour and a half before disappearing as fast as it arrived. The sky was mostly sunny with passing showers to our west. We got the edge of two of these showers but only received very light rain for maybe ten minutes or so. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots in the morning with a one foot chop over a two to three foot swell. After noon, the wind hauled out of the south and blew about the same velocity with the same sea state. The highest air temperature that Ian saw was 63F. The tide (current) was moderate in the morning but strong after noon. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. Like us ashore, they had periods of very light rain. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in haze and fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

The fishing, catching and landings today were very good. Landings were a lot better than yesterday. Actually, today's trip seemed like a marathon trip compared to yesterday's day trip for landings. Most good sized fish landed were pollock. Pollock were also, of course, the most prevalent legal fish landed, by far. Market cod came in second. Legal landings also included fifteen haddock (not so much of a haddock day today), one cusk and twenty mackerel. Released fish included one wolffish and fifty-five dogfish, many less than yesterday's trip. But in my defense, no bait was used today. That would also explain the low haddock count today as well. They drift fished all day. Only jigs and cod flies were used as terminal gear.

No high hook angler was selected. Nor could they have even begun to figure it out. I didn't ask. Gene Jablonski caught the largest fish, a 13 pound cod. Collectively, the group didn't want to include fish that couldn't be landed legally. Richard Cranium won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. There was a tie for third place, both with fish of 11 pounds each. Jim Lamb caught an 11 pound pollock while Karl Dence caught an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Brady caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Tom Penny caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Mike Biggs landed the hard luck award for losing a porbeagle shark of about 200 pounds right on the surface. Captain Ian had the gaff into the tail of the shark but the gaff tore out of the fish, got off the hook and swam away with no chance at a second gaff strike.

I received a $20.00 donation from "Jersey Tim" & Nancy Hessalink (NJ) sponsoring me in my ride for a cancer cure with the Pan-Mass Challenge, the bike ride coming up on the first Saturday in August. Thank you both very much for your support. I do appreciate it! See, the pink laces do work, even to those who know why they are there. You had to ask, didn't you?

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo hosted the Chris Chojnowski full day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly cloudy, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the southwest for most of the morning. Wind speeds were about ten knots or so. By late morning/afternoon, the wind had hauled out of the west at fifteen knots or better. The sky was overcast most of the morning with spits of rain now and again. It didn't rain enough to even get the ground wet. After 1:00 PM, the sky started to clear. By 2:00 PM, the sky was mostly clear with very few clouds. The visibility was very good along the shore. The air temperature rose through the 70s to 80F by noon. Less than a half hour later the air temperature rose to 86F, the highest value I saw all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 71F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southeast at eight to ten and fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet. It was also foggy with a maximum visibility of a quarter of a mile. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The tide (current) was strong. The sky remained overcast for the whole trip. The water temperature reached a high of 55.6F.

The fishing was fair to good. The reason being that it was choppy so fish presentation wasn't the best, the fog/rough conditions made most anglers sea sick and the tide made it hard to hold bottom (with the jigs and sinkers). The catching was very good as were the landings. Most fish caught were an equal number of market cod and legal pollock in the 9 pound class. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock, six mackerel and one cusk. Only one dogfish was caught today. They anchored and drift fished. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Ryan Chojnowski (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Kelvin Burgess (CT). Chris Chojnowski (MA) caught the third and fourth largest fish, two cod of 11.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Ben Gless (MA) landed the largest pollock of the trip. It weighed 11 pounds. Connor Burta (MA) landed the hard luck award for reaching high hurler status. Ouch!

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was very good at least. Ashore, the wind started out light from the southwest but hauled out of the west after 7:00 AM. The wind blew out of the west northwest at ten knots or less for the rest of the day. The air temperature rose, as it has for the last few days, into the 80s. The highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit was 83F. The sky was clear with few clouds all day. Later in the afternoon, some rain clouds went by just to our south. At 9:00 PM, it started to rain and was still raining, lightly, at 10:15 PM. The visibility was very good at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light most of the day. The ocean was calm with a sea swell of about three feet. Mid morning, the wind showed from the southwest. Seas became a one foot chop over the existing swells when the wind picked up to about ten knots as they just started to head back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 65F in the shade. The sky was clear and sunny for the trip. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good (a lot of cod from 5 to 12 pounds) but landings feel into the category of "good". Cod overshadowed pollock landings despite the fact that there were many more pollock schools than cod schools. But the pollock bite was not great. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included fifty haddock (there were a few less sub-legal haddock than that as well), two cusk and twenty-six mackerel. Released fish included a wolffish, a couple herring and eighteen dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ken Lang (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with twelve legal haddock and pollock (he caught a lot of cod). And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. He also caught the largest pollock at 11.5 pounds which also turned out to be the second largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was a 10.25 pound cod caught by Steve Balevre (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Thorne (NH) landed a 10 pound pollock as did Kyle Thorne (NH). In fact, Kyle was the first angler to catch a fish large enough to weigh. Michelle McMillan (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

After everyone left, Jared finished cleaning the Bunny Clark and then moved the boat to it's night time spot, stern to the Barnacle Billy's float. Just before the stern kissed the float, he backed and filled to get it in the perfect position, as he normally does. This time wasn't so normal as, in the process, one of our dock lines slipped overboard, the end getting caught in the wheel (propeller). I had just let our main manager go home for the night when I got a call. It was Jared with the sorry news.

For the better part of twenty minutes, we positioned the dock line to allow the blades of the wheel to cut the line. Wouldn't do it. Under normal conditions it would take two seconds. Finally, by running the line more forward than I would like, I kicked her into gear and cut her off. Pulling the end back in the boat we figured we were only missing a foot of line. I figured, no problem; we take the boat out for a spin, back and fill a bit and the excess will pop right out. That didn't happen. Try as I might I could not get the boat to stop vibrating under way. So back to the town float we went. I ran home, donned an old survival suit I use just for this purpose and jumped on the scooter back to the BC. Once I got under the water I noticed I did not need a knife. At the end of the dock line was an eye splice. Ian made the lines that way this spring, an eye at either end. The blade of the wheel had cut the line just in back of the splice but the eye remained over the blade. That was the only thing making the boat vibrate. I pulled myself down to the wheel and slipped the eye off the blade. Problem solved. It took us about ten more minutes to get her put to bed for the night.

I ended up staying at the restaurant until 10:30 PM.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was cloudless, there was just enough wind to ruffle the surface of the ocean along the shore and the visibility over it was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west and then west northwest. Wind speeds were ten knots, more or less. The sky was very clear with few clouds and a very bright sun. The visibility over the ocean was very good. The air temperature reached a high of at least 76F in Ogunquit. The water along the shore was calm with wind ruffles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. And, really, there was not much wind above five knots. The ocean was calm over a two foot swell. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was very clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water reached a high of 57F.

The fishing was excellent all day and the catching was just as good. Landings were on the fair to good side in the morning, excellent in the afternoon making landings very good overall. I've always thought that if part of the day is going to be slower, let it be the early part so you can end the trip with a bang. That's just what happened today. Did Ian plan it that way? You would have to ask him. I didn't. Most good sized fish caught were market cod over 5 pounds. However, legal pollock were close behind. And pollock was the most prevalent legal fish caught today. Legal landings also included thirty-six haddock (there were more sub-legal haddock caught today than legal haddock), two cusk, twenty-four mackerel and two herring. Released fish included three wolffish, a hundred and thirty-six cod, forty-two dogfish and one small redfish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and flies caught the lions share of the fish.

Ian didn't tell me who was high hook. I didn't ask. Joe Cadorette (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. I believe that Joe was the first one to land a fish big enough for Ian to weigh. This fish was a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by his father, John Cadorette (MA). John caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The 11 pound pollock tied with another 11 pound pollock, caught by Rocco Ventura, Sr. (NY), for third place or the third largest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Weldon (NH) also had a great double keeper catch. His catch included a 10.5 pound pollock and a 9.5 pound pollock. Osie Johnston (NY) caught the largest cod of the day weighing 10.5 pounds. Rocco Ventura, Jr. (ME) caught a pollock that weighed the same, 10.5 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines!

Tim Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the annual spring Dave Miller (all western Massachusetts) marathon trip charter today.

At 2:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was clear, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

Sliding out of the Cove, through the gate and on to the fishing grounds was a simple matter this morning. The visibility was excellent, the wind was light out of the southwest, the stars were bright and the air temperature warmed as we went. The air temperature, by the way, was 58.3F at the dock before we started.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at three knots, maybe, to start. The ocean was flat calm with wind streaks and calm patches. The ocean was calm for almost all of the morning. Before noon, the wind increased to ten and, almost, fifteen knots. Seas increased to about two feet in chops. It seemed like it was going to "air on" but that never happened. The wind ended up dying out to about five knots until we were ready to tie everything up and head home. We carried light south southwest winds for the first hour on the ride home. After that the wind hauled out of the southwest and breezed up to almost fifteen knots with two foot chops. We carried this wind and sea conditions for a while but this all changed when we ran into rain showers about fifteen miles from shore. Variable winds increased to over twenty knots with rain blowing sideways lots of white caps. We arrived in Perkins Cove under sunny skies.

The high air temperature was 67F in the shade. The tide (current) was strong all day.The sky was perfectly clear with a bright sun all morning. After noon, high thin clouds covered part of the sky, mostly to the south, giving us soft lighting to take pictures. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or more. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.5F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing was just shy of excellent (the tide), the catching was excellent and landings were very good overall. Landings would have been excellent too had we been able to keep cod. We released just about two hundred cod between 6 and 18.5 pounds. The most prevalent species landed were pollock but very close behind were legal haddock. We had very few sub-legal haddock today, seventeen to be exact. We had many haddock in the 4 pound class today. Legal landings also included nine cusk, three whiting and five mackerel. We released three dogfish, one wolffish and lost two smallish bluefin tuna. We anchored once but drift fished for the rest of the time on the grounds. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

If you included market cod, then Dave Miller was high hook with the most legal fish. He caught good sized fish from the moment we started until the last bell. If you included just pollock and haddock it would have been a toss up between Ron Sciascia (MA) and Steve Saunders (MA). I wasn't up in the bow or I would have included Shane Anderson (MA) - maybe. It's all a guess, anyway. I would have had to count fillets to get a true assessment. I didn't do that.

Shane Anderson caught the largest fish of the trip, an 18.5 pound cod. This ties the Bunny Clark's fifth largest cod of the fishing season so far. He won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the fifth largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 17 pound cod caught by Dave Miller. I took a picture with my iPhone of Dave with his nice new looking cod. This digital image appears on the left (Kris Lien (MA) is the angler in picture standing to Dave's right). Some of his other good fish included an 11 pound pollock, a 13 pound cod, a 14 pound cod, a 13.5 pound cod, a 13 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. There were a few other cod in the 12 pound range of his that I did not weigh. Dave also had a double cod catch where both fish were about 11 pounds, both caught on the same line at the same time. The third largest fish was a 16.5 pound pollock caught by Rodney Miller (MA). Rod caught this fish as part of a double that included another pollock of 8.75 pounds. This double is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest double of the season so far. Rodney won the boat pool for the largest fish with this pollock - cod were not accepted in the boat pool today (I don't share the same faith in the knowledge of the Federal government). A couple of other fish that I weighed for Rodney included a 12 pound pollock and a 14 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Saunders caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 16 pound cod. He also caught a 5 pound haddock, a 14 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. Jeff Smith (MA) caught the largest haddock of the day at 5.75 pounds. I also weighed a pollock of his at 10.5 pounds. Joe Leger (MA/ME) landed a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. I also weighed a 10 pound pollock for him. Peter Daige (MA) caught a 12 pound cod, his largest fish. Jim Higgins (MA) might have lost the biggest groundfish of the day. His best fish was a 5 pound haddock. And he caught the biggest double haddock catch with two haddock of 4 pounds each. Kris Lien caught a 10 pound pollock and a cod that I didn't weigh that was probably 11 or 12 pounds. Dennis "Twinkle Toes" Pietro (NH) landed the two biggest cusk. One was 8 pounds and the other, probably a Maine state trophy, was last seen floating away with seven sea gulls perched on the carcass! Ron Sciascia caught a pollock of 10.25 pounds that I weighed. Kenny Casey (MA) landed the hard luck award for being unduly constrained by his fishing equipment!

I received a $25.00 donation from Dave Miller supporting me in quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Dave and his wife, Joanne, have sponsored me since I first participated in this event eleven years ago. Thanks, Dave. I hope the shirt fits!

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was a cool 52F, the sky was cloudless, there was just enough wind to ruffle the surface of the ocean along the shore and the visibility over it was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten knots, more or less, in the morning and kept up during the day to some degree. The wind never changed direction. The sky was clear and sunny all day, cloudless most of the morning. Around 4:00 PM, a cloud or series of them came over and gave us fifteen drops of rain. That departed, the wind picked up to fifteen knots out of the northwest, the sun came out, the wind died down and the day went back to what it had been. The highest air temperature I saw was 75F. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet to start. The westerly wind dropped to just about nothing and then hauled out of the southwest. The wind hardly blew out of the southwest leaving the ocean calm for the rest of the day. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The air temperature reached a high 63F. The tide was moderate. The visibility was excellent or better than twenty miles. The surface water reached a high temperature of 58F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good overall and the landings were good to very good. The first spot of the day was as good as it gets. From then, it was good to very good on the landings side of things. Most legal fish landed were pollock followed by haddock, a good number of both. Market cod would have been the most prevalent species landed had they been able to keep them. Legal landings also included three cusk. No mackerel were caught. Nor were there any dogfish caught today. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

The catching was very evenly spaced between anglers. Indeed, everyone coming off the boat looked like they had the same amount. A very good day. Ryan Rediker (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 12.25 pound pollock caught by Bud Hazzard (NY). He also released an 11.25 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Ken Carter (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: John Mayol (ME) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Gary Bertone (MA) landed a pollock that weighed 11 pounds. Arnie Ulrich (NJ) caught the largest haddock at 4.5 pounds. His largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod. Hank Small (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting involved in the most tangled lines.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:30 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

The air temperature in the Cove when we started out underneath the footbridge was 58F. We had another easy run out to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm with a very light chop and a light westerly wind. Continuing on to the fishing grounds, we had excellent visibility, clear skies and mild weather.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest at the same velocity it would take to raise a half foot chop or about five knots. The ocean was a ruffled calm. The wind stayed out of the west southwest or west of west southwest for the rest of the day including the ride back to Perkins Cove. The most wind we saw was about ten knots or less and a one foot chop, at most. For the last half of the ride in the ocean was calm with zero wind. The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade. The sky was sunny and mostly clear when we arrived on the grounds but gradually started to cloud over. By noon, the sky was overcast. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. The tide, current, ranged from moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from twenty to thirty nautical miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.3F. But I noticed the water temperature rose two degrees just inside the grounds in the deeper water. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Steve Selmer (NH) called it "a fish and a half a cast" all day long. The only problem we had was trying to get away from the cod. The first few stops were mostly double catches of market cod. The cod were so savage on the bite that, for a time, we couldn't get anything else. The majority of fish caught were market to large cod, by far, for the trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock. By the end of the trip we had enough pollock to be within fifty fish of the number of market cod that we released. Legal landings also included twenty-six haddock, eight cusk and a mackerel. We released two dogfish. We anchored mostly but did some drift fishing in the morning. Anchoring was by far the best method. All terminal gear worked well.

I don't know who would have been high hook if market cod were included. Everyone did well. Cody Ouimette (VT) was high hook for part of the day with the most pollock. But, overall, I couldn't tell you who was high hook with the most legal fish. For landings, it was twenty fish a person average.

Marie Harding (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 28.25 pound cod. This is the largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I thought that her husband, Bill Harding, had caught the fish. So I got the camera out, took shots from a couple of different angles and, then, quickly released the fish alive. It was only later that I found out it wasn't his fish! In the meantime, I had a nice picture of Bill holding up Marie's fish! That digital image appears on the right. I don't think Bill caught a fish over 10 pounds! Marie also caught a 14 pound cod earlier in the day.

Steve Selmer won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the fourth largest fish, a 16.25 pound pollock. He caught this fish as a double along with a 9.75 pound cod. This is our fourth largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Some of Steve's other fish included a 16 pound cod, a 15.5 pound cod, a 14.75 pound cod and a 13 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 17.5 pound cod caught by Larry Zampieri (NH). He did not get in the boat pool today. Some of his other good fish included a 16 pound cod, a 10.5 pound cod and a double that included a 12.5 pound cod and an 11 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The third largest fish was a 17 pound cod caught by Tim Libby (NH). Tim did not enter the boat pool for the second largest fish. The only other fish of Tim's that I weighed was a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Eight year old Cody Dahr (PA) caught the second largest pollock (or keeper) of the trip at 11 pounds. This was his first deep sea fishing trip. He caught the most variety of fish of any angler. Other fish he caught included twenty-five percent of all the cusk, two or three haddock, quite a few pollock and cod whenever we were catching them. It wasn't the best introduction to deep sea fishing, in my opinion; he's going to think deep sea fishing is like this all the time! Mike Zampieri (NH) was limited by his equipment. He hooked what I thought to be a halibut early in the trip. On the first strike, his reel came off his rod. In the middle of the mess his fish, whatever it was, broke off! The reel fell off again after he hooked another, much smaller, fish. We ended up giving him one of our poles to put his reel on. I weighed two fish of his, a 10 pound cod and a 13 pound cod. Donny Briggs (VT) landed the hard luck award for the manner in which he lost three 4 pound haddock. It wasn't like he was gently trying to get these fish in the boat. It was more like he was shaking them off the hook before the fish got anywhere near the boat! One of these haddock even swung over the deck three times before it swung over the water and fell in! Oh, Donny, Donny, Donny!

I was sponsored by two anglers today in my quest for a cancer free world with my involvement the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity cycling event taking place the first Saturday of August. These people and their donations are as follows: Marie Harding for a generous $80.00 and Cody Ouimette for $40.00. Thank you both for your support and generosity. I very much appreciate it!

Friday, June 30, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was mostly overcast, there was not a leaf moving in the trees, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good in some haze. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest in the early part of the morning at ten knots, backed off and then blew out of the southwest at ten knots or so in the later part of the morning. The southwest wind blew a little harder in the early afternoon before hauling out of the south and dropping to eight knots or less. The sky was overcast all day. The was some very light rain at times but not enough to make the road wet. At 7:00 PM, it started to rain in earnest. The rain had not stopped when I went to bed at 11:00 PM. The air temperature reached a high of at least 81F in Perkins Cove. It was humid. The visibility was good in haze all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were three to four feet in a mixture of offshore and local chop. The wind hauled out of the south southwest at ten knots after noon. Seas remained similar but a bit less. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The sky was overcast. The visibility ranged from three to five miles in haze and fog. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was good/very good, the catching was excellent and landings were very good or maybe a bit better than that. They caught an equal number of market cod and legal pollock. Pollock was, by far, the most prevalent legal fish. Legal landings also included two redfish, twenty-four haddock and three cusk. There were slightly more sub-legal haddock released than legal haddock kept. They saw no dogfish or mackerel. Anchoring and drifting were the two boating methods employed. All terminal gear worked well.

Bill Socha (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. Mark Weldon (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Daniel Vitalic (ME). Daniel also caught an 11 pound pollock. Anthony Gervais (WA) caught the third largest fish, two fish, both 11.5 pounds. One was a cod and the other was a pollock. Anthony also caught two pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Bogusz (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. Will Salldin (ME) caught our ninth halibut of the Bunny Clark season with a 9 pounder. His largest fish was an 11 pound cod. Denise Lavoie (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip. However, no one claims to have actually seen her hurl!

I received two donations sponsoring my cancer fund raising bike ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was a very generous $200.00 from Brett & Mindy MacNutt (MA). The other was a generous $50.00 from Bill Socha. Thank you all so very much for your support and generosity. I really do appreciate it!

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. Ashore, the wind stayed light out of the south. This was nice in the Cove as it kept the air temperature down. But it was humid. So, at the house, where the air temperature was 81F (it was 76F in the Cove), it really felt like 90F. The air temperature got cooler closer to the evening when the wind picked up out of the south to twenty knots. The sky was mostly sunny with some clouds. Looking at the radar, there were many rain storms well to the west of us moving in a northeasterly direction and away from the coast. The visibility ranged from poor in fog to good in haze and everything in between. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 65F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were two to four foot swells with a one foot chop on top. The air temperature rose to a high of 67F. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in fog during the morning and three to five miles in haze and fog after noon. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast skies. The tide (current) ran moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing was good (the strong tide and seas took it down a notch today), the catching was very good and landings were good, at least. Most good sized fish today were legal haddock with market cod right behind them. There were a few more sub-legal haddock caught today than legal haddock. Legal landings also included thirty-one pollock, six cusk and two herring. No dogfish or mackerel were caught. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but mostly bait was used. And bait catches haddock best. Even Fred Kunz knows that!

It was too hard to tell who was high hook. There was a lot of action and no one is counting fillets or market cod that get released. Janel White (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cod. She also caught the second largest fish and the largest pollock of the trip at 10 pounds. The third largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock but Ian didn't write down who caught it! It wasn't Janel. But Janel did catch an 8.5 pound pollock.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind increased out of the south southwest to fifteen and twenty knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The high air temperature was 66F. The tide was moderate. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in fog and haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 54F.

The fishing was tough with the sea conditions (many anglers were sea sick), the catching was good but there were no landings except for a few mackerel. Most fish caught were cod, about eighteen of them. Three would have been legal in a different regulatory season. They also caught a few sub-legal pollock, a cunner and a couple of sculpins. The mackerel count was five. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait.

Moe Zuniga (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a cod that weighed 4.5 pounds caught by Zack Gentil. Anthony Boccuzzi (CT) caught the third largest fish, a 4 pound cod. Nick Gentil (CT) landed the hard luck award for becoming the most vociferous hurler of the evening. Ouch!

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. Ashore, it warmed up fast. And it was humid. The highest air temperature I saw was 86F. The wind started out of the south with associated fog along the shore. The fog was gone by 9:00 PM, primarily because the wind shifted out of the northwest. That kept air temperatures warm as opposed to yesterday when the wind was on shore. The visibility cleared to good. The wind blew out of the northwest at ten or more knots. The sky was nearly cloudless. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 65F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to eight knots. Seas were three feet in long rolling swells under fairly calm surface. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The visibility was less than a hundred yards in fog when they first arrived on the grounds. A half hour later, the fog was gone for the day. They were left with a haze that allowed a visibility of about twelve miles. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was very clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.2F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good to excellent today. Most larger fish caught were market cod and legal pollock, almost exactly the same number of each. Legal landings also included twenty-one haddock and three cusk. No dogfish, mackerel or redfish were seen. Drifting was the method. Cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Kendell Ogden (VT) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Jon McKenney (ME). Cody Ouimette (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the third largest fish (the other two anglers did not enter the boat pool), an 11 pound pollock. Cody caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 8.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: John Warden (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Luke Faulstich (MO) landed the hard luck award for not allowing his stomach to get in sync with the motion of the ocean! That has got to be tough.

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind stayed light out of the southwest, five knots. Seas were calm. The sky was clear. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. The tide was strong. The visibility ranged to twelve miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56.9F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was good and landings were fair (good for an afternoon trip). Legal landings included five cusk and a cunner. There were quite a few cod caught but not a single one larger than 3 pounds. They drift fished for the trip. Everyone used bait.

Dan Vesler (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cusk. The second largest fish were cusk that weighed 4.5 pounds each, two of them. Jared Buffington (CT) caught one while John Davey (NH) caught the other one.

Other Angler Highlights: Eight year old Jack Nolan (VT) caught the first legal fish of the evening, a 4 pound cusk. Vicki Hamel (VT) landed a 3.5 pound cusk. Noah Palmer (MA) caught the dreaded mal de mer and suffered through the evening, ending up with capturing the hard luck award.

Monday, July 3, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Sean Devich ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was very good at least. Ashore, it was another warm one. The air temperature reached a high of 86F. But it didn't feel nearly as warm as it did today. The reason: it was less humid. The wind was light at dawn, westerly at ten knots or so by mid morning and then west northwest and northwest by noon and into the afternoon. At 2:00 PM, the wind was out of the northwest at ten knots. The sky was clear with some clouds all day. The visibility was close to excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew light out of the west southwest to begin and then up to ten knots. Seas were calm to a one foot chops over long rolling southeast sea swells of two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching and keeping were very good overall. Most good sized fish caught were pollock, by far. Very many more than market cod, for a change. Market cod did come in second. But close to the cod were the legal haddock. The cull was one to one or fifty percent of all the haddock caught were legal haddock. Legal landings also included three cusk and one monkfish. Released fish, besides the cod, included thirty dogfish and three wolffish. No mackerel were caught. Drifting was the only boating method employed. All terminal gear worked well. It was just a great fishing day overall.

Ian couldn't be specific on high hook (the most legal fish) but, Ian agreed, it had to be a Martineau. Steve Martineau (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a 12.5 pound pollock. His largest cod weighed 10.5 pounds. There was a tie for second place at 14 pounds. David Martineau (NH) landed a 14 pound pollock while Joe Martineau (MA) caught (and released) a 14 pound cod. David also landed an 11 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Martineau (MA) caught the most haddock with a count of eight keepers. Shaun Montgomery (NY) caught a few fish but I don't believe he caught anything over 10 pounds. What he did catch was a 6 pound monkfish, a tie for the Bunny Clark's largest monkfish of the season so far. Shaun has been fishing with me for as long as I have owned the Bunny Clark. Mark Weldon (NH) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Bill Hallock (NY) landed the hard luck award for helping Mark Weldon take a pollock of Mark's line only lose control and drop the fish overboard, never to be seen again! Bill actually won the hard luck award for having to put up with Mark's abuse about losing his fish for the rest of the trip! All in good fun!

I received a $20.00 donation from Walt & Kim Klinger (ME) sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to raise money to fight cancer in every way. Walt and his father started fishing with me over thirty years ago. Thank you both very much for your generosity and kindness. Much appreciated!

(Yes, it's) Tim Tuesday, Independence Day, July 4, 2017

Anthony Palumbo and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was cloudless, there was not a breath of wind, the ocean was flat calm with hardly a ripple and the visibility over it was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten knots or more before dying out at 6:00 PM. The air temperature reached 83F in Perkins Cove. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 55F).

We had an easy ride to the fishing grounds. The ocean was flat calm with hardly a breath of northwest wind, the small wavelets following us out. The air temperature was in the 60s and the visibility was excellent.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of west northwest, then west and then, on the ride home, out of the southwest. When we got closer to shore, the wind was coming out of the west. The wind was light all day. The hardest it blew was, maybe, eight knots when we first started to head home. The air temperature was 71F at it's highest value. The sky was mostly sunny with more clouds toward the inshore than offshore. The visibility ranged to thirty miles or more. The tide (current) was fairly strong. It slacked off to a moderate drift later in the day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63.2F, the highest water temperature we have seen this season so far.

The fishing was very good, the catching was good and landings just good, my slowest landings day on the boat this season so far. There were plenty of fish around and they followed the boat while the boat was in drift mode. But the bite was way off. It was really too nice a day. But it was a wonderful day as well. We had humpback whales around the boat all day. The whales did everything but jump and tail lob. They were "flipper flopping", diving, rolling and just lolling around for everyone to see. Plus it was so calm it was like sitting in the front bench at Fenway.

Most good sized fish caught were pollock followed by market cod. We released approximately forty cod between 5 and 8 pounds. Most pollock today were between 5 and 8 pounds with very few larger ones. Legal landings also included twenty-five haddock, five cusk and a herring. Almost forty sub-legal haddock were released. We also caught about seventy dogfish, maybe more. And they were big and hard to take off a hook. We anchored once, drift fished the rest. All terminal gear worked pretty much the same with the edge given to the cod flies.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook but the nod had to be given to either Rick Schwartz (NH), Travis Mustone (MA), Kevin Clarke (MA) or even Tim Diaz (AZ). Scott Doyle (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish of the trip weighed 10 pounds. There were four, all pollock, each one caught by a separate angler. Those anglers included Bill Laney (FL), Tim Diaz, Travis Mustone and Josh Laney (FL). Bill also caught an 8.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Frank Becchetti (MA) caught a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish. Nicole Diaz (AZ) said she didn't feel well. She thought she was sea sick. But she kept her color and, later, recovered somewhat. So when it came to awarding the hard luck award t-shirt I had to give it to Travis Mustone for losing two jigs on the bottom!

The digital image, above left, is a shot of Anthony giving out bags of fillets to the anglers at the end of the trip. The Bunny Clark has the wooden anchors out at the middle town float. You can see Barnacle Billy's restaurant (original) in the background, above.

After I was done with the Bunny Clark, I went home, worked on the computer (while eating dinner) and then took a nap. At 8:00 PM, Deb and I went back to the Cove and I met the people for the fireworks cruise I run every year. This is a locals only event where I take the same people I have come to know and love over the years. It's a gratis trip where I make one of the passengers a mate for the night. Tonight I made Dana Decormier my official mate. For having no training, Dana was great and very helpful. But why shouldn't he be; he's fished with me for years and worked as a deck on my lobster boat.

The fireworks are off Ogunquit Beach. And the weather couldn't have been better. The ocean was flat calm with no swell to speak of. I slowly made my way out of the Cove and went to find a spot to stay for an hour or so. I anchored in about ten feet of water right off the beach. Here we had a good view of the proceedings. There are some digital images below.



Above: a view from the bow before the fireworks started.



Above: The first salvo.



Above: Later into the evening.



Above: Near the last gun. The whole show lasted about twenty-three wonderful minutes.



After the fireworks, I waited around for Steve Weiner's harpoon tuna boat to show up in Perkins Cove. My son, Micah, works for him as part of a three man team. They had two fish. One of the fish came from a bunch that Micah spotted. The other bunch, that netted them a fish, was spotted by Chris, Steve's son. Chris is the striker. Above is a shot of Micah as the last fish is being loaded into the truck. I stayed with the crew and the fish until about 10:45 PM. There were five tuna that came into Perkins Cove this night.

I was sponsored by several people today in my quest for a cancer free world with my involvement the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity cycling event taking place the first Saturday of August. These people and their donations are as follows: Andy & Susan Tapparo (MA) in an "egift" for a very generous $250.00, Jon & Fran Leavitt (NH) for a very generous $200.00 and Lou & Barb Carangelo for $25.00. All of these very nice individuals have supported me in this venture through the years. I so much appreciate this support and their undying generosity. Thanks so very much!

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was cloudless (again!), there was not a breath of wind, the ocean was flat calm with no ripples on the surface and the visibility over it was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew lightly out of the northwest in the morning. By 1:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the south at light speeds. The ocean was calm all day. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was excellent. There was very little humidity. And the air temperature in Perkins Cove reached 78F, that I saw. It could have been warmer. It certainly felt warmer even without the humidity. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was flat calm. The air temperature reached a high of 71F. In the sun with the Bunny Clark on a flat calm mirror of an ocean with the sun beating down, it was hot. It certainly felt hot! The visibility ranged over fifteen miles in some haze. The sky was nearly cloudless. The tide (current) was light. The water temperature reached it's highest value of the year at 65F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good. There were quite a few dogfish, again, like yesterday's trip. Of course, when you catch a dogfish you are displacing the chance of getting a fish you can keep or a fish that you might desire to catch. So that took away from things a bit. Most good sized fish caught today were haddock with market cod (cod from 6 to 8 pounds) close behind. Legal landings also included twenty-nine pollock and four cusk. Anchoring and drifting were the methods. All terminal gear worked well.

I believe that Frank Noble (ME) was high hook. If he wasn't then it was someone with whom I was not familiar with. David Sei (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 29 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is the largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date and the largest pollock we have seen since Tom Donaghy (ME) caught a trophy pollock of the same size on August 12, 2015. That fish is our second trophy pollock of the season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of David's big pollock. That digital image appears on the right. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Stephen King (NH). Rodd Frobbel (NY) landed the third and fourth largest fish of the trip. They were an 11 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Stephen King also landed the hard luck award for losing a jig! Unfortunately, it wasn't because a big halibut inhaled the jig and bit off the monofilament leader above it! No, I believe it was the bottom - but I certainly could be wrong!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops to one foot. The air temperature was 70F. The sky was very clear and sunny. The tide was light. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in some haze.

The fishing was excellent (great conditions), the catching was good but landings were not. The only three legal fish included one mackerel and two cunners. Released fish included twenty cod (six of which would have made the legal limit had they been able to keep cod - at twenty-three inches), four pollock and two sculpins. Anchoring and drifting were the boating methods. Everyone used bait. Only one cod fly and one jig was used.

Armand Nadeau (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 4.25 pound cod caught by Austin Giacomelli (NY). Austin also caught a cod that weighed 3.75 pounds. Two anglers tied for third place with cod of 4 pounds each. Sam Mallory (NY) caught one while Donna Mallory (NY) caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Gus LaRose (NH) caught a cod that weighed 3.75 pounds. Mike Arnold (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing the jig! The only jig used.

Thursday, Stage 6 of the Tour de France, July 6, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was nearly cloudless, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. Ashore, the wind started out from the southeast and slowly worked it's way around to the south. Wind speeds were about ten knots. This velocity remained for most of the morning. The morning sky was clear and sunny. After noon, high thin clouds started to give the day a softer feel. But it never really got overcast for long. For a time it looked like it was going to rain. But it never did rain and these heavier clouds cleared away. When the moon rose out of the ocean it could be seen through thin cloudiness well into the night. In fact, it was that way when I closed Barnacle Billy's restaurant at 11:00 PM. During the afternoon, the wind increased to fifteen knots, maybe. The air temperature rose to at least 76F in Ogunquit before dropping down a bit in the late afternoon. The visibility was good to very good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 59F).

The ride to the fishing grounds was pretty smooth with a five knots of south southwest wind and a calm ocean. On the grounds, the wind increased from the south southwest to fifteen knots. Seas increased to two feet in chops before the fishing was done. The air temperature reached the high 60s. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The sky was sunny for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing, the catching and landings were very good to excellent today. For once, very few market cod, or those cod that would have been legal if we could keep cod, were caught. Most good sized fish caught and most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. There was a hell of a pollock bite today. In fact, the pollock bit so well that not much else got a chance to bite the hook! Legal landings also included twelve haddock, one cusk and a cunner. Thirty-six dogfish and one wolffish were released. Only twenty cod from 5 to 12.5 pounds were caught and released. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked the same.

Aurelius Gricius (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest was a 12.5 pound pollock. Tyler Almy (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. The second largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Tevin Wiete (IN). Aurelius and Norm Turgeon (ME) all tied for the third largest fish at 12.5 pounds. Norm caught a 12.5 pound cod and a 12.5 pound pollock. Aurelius' was, of course, his 12.5 pound pollock. Norm also landed an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Wheeler (NH) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 10.5 pound pollock. He later caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. Travis Turgeon (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being a little under the weather for most of the trip.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to fifteen knots with seas in chops of two feet over a rolling swell of two feet. The sky was most overcast. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. And the surface water temperature is warming up. Ian saw a value of 61F tonight which is the highest it has been, by a few degrees, on the inside bottom.

The fishing was good, even though the seas were more than most of the anglers had anticipated, there was no current so lines tended well. The catching was fair to good with quite a few sub-legal fish caught. Landings were poor. Legal fish included two cusk and two cunners. They anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well.

During the fishing, a big shark (Ian didn't see the shark well enough to get an identification. Porbeagle?) bit one of the bait rigs and took three other lines with it on a wild run. Although it didn't take long for all four lines to break, many of the anglers saw the shark and much excitement was enjoyed in the process. You never know what is going to happen when fishing!

Joe McCormick (CO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound cusk. This is the largest cusk that we have seen on the Bunny Clark this season so far. And only half a pound from becoming a Maine state trophy. The second largest fish was a cusk that weighed 6.5 pounds caught by Matt Kulsa (PA). Young Lauren Neal (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer!

I received three donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money with the Jimmy Fund for cancer research and care. The event goes off on August 5th, soon approaching! Those donors and their donations included Ed Sterste (MA) for $30.00, Jim "My Second Favorite Democrat" Sheehan (MA) for $20.00 and a generous $50.00 from Don & Rebecca Stedman in memory of Jim Stedman, who lost his battle with cancer a year and a half ago in his early 50s. Thank you all so very much for your support and kindness. Many who very much appreciate your help with never know you for all the good you do. But I will!

Friday, Stage 7 of the Tour de France, July 7, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. Ashore, we had overcast skies all morning with a very light intermittent rain starting at 9:00 AM. At noon, the rain became steady, heavy at times but mostly a light rain. We had no wind with the rain. The ocean along the shore remained calm. The highest air temperature that I saw was 67F. It might have been warmer earlier. The visibility was good in haze overall. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five knots. After noon, there was no wind at all. The ocean was flat calm for the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 65F on the grounds. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in fog. They experienced a light rain for most of the trip and the sky remained overcast all the way back to the dock. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was nearly so and landings were very good. Most good sized fish caught were legal pollock, by far. Had cod been legal to keep, they would have come in as the third most prevalent legal fish. Haddock came in second, the cull being one legal haddock for every two caught. No other legal fish were caught today, just pollock and haddock. Released fish, besides the cod, included one wolffish and twelve dogfish. Drifting was the boating method. Everyone used bait and cod flies. With jigs in the equation, this day had the potential of being excellent in landings.

It would have been hard to tell who was high hook. I didn't ask. Evan Cox (IN) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Casie Harkins (MA). She also caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Ben Cox (IN) caught the third largest fish and the largest cod of the trip at 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Harkins (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock, the only other fish of 10 pounds or greater caught today. Alex Stewart (MA) was sea sick and received the hard luck award for his malady.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast, barely. Wind speeds were less than five knots. Later, the wind hauled out of the north. But the wind was so light as to be no wind at all. The ocean was calm for the whole evening. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles in some haze. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were very good if you counted mackerel. If mackerel were not counted, landings were poor. Most legal fish landed were mackerel, as many as you wanted. Legal landings also included one cusk. Released fish included plenty of cod (all but two under twenty-four inches), pollock and sculpins. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Twelve year old Kassidy LaFlamme (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.25 pound cod, the largest cod we have seen on the evening trips this season so far. Kassidy was not in the boat pool. Captain Ian took a picture of Kassidy with her cod just before releasing it. This digital image appears on the left. Gordon MaFarlane (MO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 7.5 pound cod. This fish, obviously, was also released. The third largest fish was a 5 pound cusk caught by Amy Rivers (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Ben Viscosi (NY) landed the hard luck award by default; no one had any hard luck this evening so Ian gave the t-shirt to the youngest angler. Ben is five years old! And he had a great time, I was told.

I received a $25.00 donation from Mike Cox (IN) sponsoring me in my cancer research fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The event is due to go off at 5:30 AM on August 5th. Thank you, Mike, for your support. I very much appreciate it!

Saturday, Stage 8 of the Tour de France, July 8, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat mirror calm and the visibility over it was good in haze (fog?). At 6:00 AM, I found out that there was fog but it was a half mile offshore. This dissipated in a couple of hours with the wind. The wind never was too much of a problem, ashore, except in the thunder storms later in the day. For the most part, the day showed us south southwest winds of no more than ten knots. The sky was mostly clear for most of the day. The wind, although not much, was off the water, keeping the air temperature down. The highest value I saw was 77F. And I'm pretty sure that was tops. At 2:15 PM, it started to rain as thunder storms approached. This was followed by much thunder, lightning, wind to twenty knots or more and a torrential downpour that left so much rain at once that water started to come under the door at Barnacle Billy's and into the building. By 3:00 PM, it was pretty much over. This was followed by clear skies and light winds. We got rain again at 8:30 PM but there was no thunder and lightning. The visibility was mostly good to very good today. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 60F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at five knots or less to fifteen with seas building for the trip. Seas were chops of a foot or less to three feet at the end. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing was very good overall, the catching was excellent and landings were just shy of excellent. Had there not been so many market cod and dogfish, landings would have been excellent. Everything was biting and it didn't matter where the boat was fishing. The fish seemed to find Ian wherever he was! Most large fish landed were pollock, by far, with legal haddock coming in second and market cod a fairly close third place. Haddock landings were the most we have seen in a week or two. Legal landings also included two cusk. Approximately seventy-five dogfish were released. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked well.

I seem to remember Captain Ian telling me that Captain Todd Grimmer (NH), who works on the Yellowbird (a quality party fishing boat out of Seabrook, New Hampshire), was high hook. I'm not sure that Ian could accurately substantiate this. It was Todd's birthday. Todd goes fishing on his birthday. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Ian never did visit the bow where Todd was fishing as there were so many fish, tangles, dogfish, etc. in the cockpit (and the anglers in the bow knew what they were doing - and could handle their own fish). It was a very busy day. So Happy Birthday, Todd! May there be many more!

Alex Witwicki (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Pete Peterson (VT). Zach Hoag (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. Like Todd, Zach also caught a 10 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Corey Marggraf (NH), Captain Todd's better half, landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer! Oh captain, my captain!

I received four donations sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free world with my involvement in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. These donors and their donations were as follows: Peter Bradley (CA) with a generous "egift" of $100.00, Malcolm & Kathie Jepson (CA), also with an "egift", for $50.00, Michael & Kerry for $60.00 and Dean & Kathy Yesny (NY) for $20.00. Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. I appreciate the support, the funding and the example it sets in unity or solidarity to a cause.

Sunday, Stage 9 of the Tour de France, July 9, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good at least. Ashore, the wind started by blowing out of the west at ten knots or more. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the northwest and blew up to ten knots, just a little stronger than lifting a flag. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all day. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature in Perkins Cove reached a high of at least 80F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to eight knots. The ocean was calm to a one foot chop. The air temperature reached a high of 70F and it was very warm out in the sun on deck. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.7F.

The fishing was very good (it could have been better without the strong tide), the catching was very good and landings were good. Too many dogfish were caught today to make landings any better than good. And with the dogfish came the tangles which slowed down the catching and, most certainly, the landings. Most larger fish caught were legal pollock, far and away. Legal landings also included twenty-eight haddock (the cull was one to one, subs to legal fish) and one small monkfish. Released fish included nearly a hundred dogfish and eighteen cod from 5 to 8 pounds. Drifting was the method. Cod flies caught the most good fish.

Luke Elliott (OH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. There was a tie for the second largest fish today at 12.5 pounds, both pollock. One was caught by Nick Schobinger (AZ) and the other was caught by Jim Jordan (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Rodney Hall (ME) caught the first fish that Jared could weigh. The fish was a 10 pound pollock, Rodney's largest fish of the trip. Kyle Davis (NY) also caught a 10 pound pollock. Frank Nock (CA) also caught a 10 pound pollock. Jenny Boan (NJ) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick. There always seems to be one!

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less. The ocean was flat calm. The air temperature was 68F. The visibility was very good, at least. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.5F.

The fishing was very good (the tide again), the catching was fair to good but landings were poor. Legal fish landed only included two red hake. Released fish included ten cod, five sculpins and one sea raven. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait and some cod flies.

Jared decided to try some deeper water. When he found out that that was not the answer, it was too late to make it up in the shallow water. Chris Asher (MO) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 2.5 pound cod caught by Rich Massarese (ME). Julio Nolasco (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 2.25 pound cod. Elizabeth Mazzarese (ME), Rich's wife, landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish. I believe she was the only one. This on their first wedding anniversary!

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a ride to raise money for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. One donation was a generous $100.00 from Mark & Linda Hamel (NH) while the other one was a $5.00 donation from Lindsay Davis Wirsing (ME). Thank you all so very much for your support. It's very meaningful to me. And I certainly appreciate it.

Monday, A Rest Day in the Tour de France, July 10, 2017

Happy Birthday to my brother, Court, and my sister, Cathy.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was clear, there was no discernable wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was excellent. Ashore, it was a bit more humid than I would have liked. But the air temperature never got higher than 81F in Perkins Cove thanks to a, somewhat, onshore breeze out of the southwest. Wind speeds were about ten knots, more or less. The sky started clear but clouded up a bit at times. Sometimes it was overcast, sometimes we had a smurry sun and, at other times, the sun was clear between clouds. It was a wild overhead canopy of mixing today. It seemed like it would rain at times but it never did. The visibility ranged from good to very good in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots, more or less, all day. Seas were chops of two feet over long seas swells of the same height. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The tide (current) was light, amazingly enough after yesterday's tide. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing was good to very good, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, the best catch of haddock we have seen for at least four weeks. Remarkable, I thought. They also caught a lot of legal pollock but not nearly as many pollock as haddock. The haddock cull was a little less than one legal haddock to one sub-legal haddock. In other words, there were slightly more sub-legal haddock caught today. That's a lot of haddock. Legal landings also included a cusk and a mackerel. Released fish included twenty-eight market sized (or better ) cod from 5 pounds to 15 pounds and forty-nine dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

There was no mention of high hook. How could there have been? Max Sokolov (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod. He also caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Ian weighed another fish of his at 10 pounds, a pollock. The second largest fish title was shared by Lou Phelps (VT) and Mark Weldon (NH). Both caught an 11 pound pollock each. Mark also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. Lou's pollock was the first good sized fish to be weighed on the boat this morning. Lou also landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs!

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Lusis (FL) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Chris Oleson (CL) caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Chris Prague (PA) caught a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds.

I received a $25.00 donation sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to find a cancer free world. The donation was from Bob Mayer (ME). Thanks, Bob. Very much appreciated!

Monday, July 10, 2017

Captain Bryan Lewer, Anthony Palumbo, Sean Devich and I ran the Special Offshore Fishing Trip (SOFT) tonight, ending tomorrow night.

At 7:30 PM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. I recruited Bryan Tufts, one of the best Bunny Clark deck hands (now a lobsterman out of Kennebunkport) I have ever had working for me, to steer to the offshore grounds while I slept. We had a seven hour run. And, obviously, I would trust Bryan with my life. The ride out was good for the first half hour that I had the wheel before giving the helm to Bryan. Seas were chops of a foot or two over left over swell/chops of two to three feet. Stars were out before I retired to the bunk. Bryan saw a wind/sea increase for the first two hours. After that, more wind and bigger seas. For fifteen miles Bryan steered through a squall that came up from behind carrying thirty knots of wind, sideways rain and six foot seas (chops) with the occasional queer one. I never noticed! About the time we arrived on the grounds, the wind had lightened up and the seas had dropped to three feet in a left over long chop. This is what I rolled out to, including good visibility, mild/warm temperatures, diminishing wind/seas and overcast skies.

Tim Tuesday, July 11, 2017

On the grounds, the wind blew out of south to south southwest about eight knots all day. Sometimes the wind was lighter, sometimes a bit stronger but no more than a one foot chop and good visibility with some haze. We had a light rain for most of the morning. The air temperature reached a high of 68F. The sky was overcast for most of the day with the occasional peek at the sun. The visibility was good for most of the morning with fog limiting visibility in the afternoon to about a mile and less until about half way home. The tide (current) was strong all morning but started to abate after noon. It never got any less than moderate but drifting up into the wind at the end of the trip gave us perfect line tending and a great catch. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.8F, the highest water temperature we have seen this season so far. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 63F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 65F).

We had a wonderful fishing day overall with a few major highlights. We hooked up with six halibut, our first a legal 38 pounder (44 inches fork length) caught by Neil Feldman (NJ) who caught a 12 pound halibut near the end of the trip. These are the first two halibut that Neil has ever caught. Later, Lewis Hazelwood (MA) foul hooked an 86 pound halibut that took him just a little more than a half hour to land. The fish was so worn out from the fight, I was able, with Bryan Lewer's help, to lift the fish aboard, get a weight, take two pictures and release it back alive in a bit of a Chinese fire drill. It was heart breaking to have to release the largest halibut the Bunny Clark has ever seen! But that's the law; one halibut per trip! Later, Bob MacNeil boated a 34 pound legal (in size) halibut that we, too, had to release after a weight and a couple pictures. Mid morning, Bob Mayer (ME) hooked the biggest halibut of the day, a fish I would have loved to have boated. But, I believe it was too big to handle (since we already had one aboard) and after getting to the point where we might get a visual (I already had a signature match on the sounding machine), it screwed straight to bottom. Things probably would have been fine but Bob's drag was way too tight and it broke off half way to bottom. Bob didn't realize his drag was that tight as it had been taking line. But when I tested it, I was amazed that it hadn't broken off much earlier. The other halibut involved Larry Kabat (NH) who hooked up half way to the surface. I got a signature match on that fish too. Not as big as Bob's, it tried to eat a smallish pollock that was caught on Bob's fly above the jig. It took the rig to bottom but allowed Larry to start gaining line again, starting it back to the surface. Larry lost the fish up in the water column somewhere. The halibut never got the hook. The pollock was all scarred up but the teeth never pierced the skin and the halibut couldn't have been more than 50 pounds.

We had two bluefin tuna hookups. One hit Neil Feldman's jig on the way down or up. That didn't last very long before it broke off. Dave Miller (MA), on the other hand, fought a bluefin that had to be around 200 pounds for about an hour and a half. Bryan Tufts and I took turns taking the helm, keeping the fish as close to the boat as possible as Dave fought it (perfectly, in my opinion). The reel broke fifteen minutes into the fight, losing the reverse dog and losing control of the handle (spinning backward). That made it tough because Dave could never let go of the handle when the tuna would go into sulking mode. After an hour, though, we didn't seem like we were winning. So I talked Dave into putting more pressure on the fish. So the two of us worked the fish. After I added a little more pressure when the fish made a run, the line popped at a weak point in the main line! Nice job, Tim!

We also lost two porbeagle sharks and had our first blue shark encounter.

Groundfishing was very good overall (without the strong tide it would have been excellent), catching was excellent and landings were very good, better than excellent had we been able to keep cod. If I told you how many market cod we caught,you wouldn't believe me. The figure was the highest we have seen for years. More market cod were caught than the combination of all other fish caught today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. We had half as many legal haddock, the cull being eleven to one, legal haddock to sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included a halibut, a monkfish, fifteen mackerel and ten cusk. Released fish, besides the previously mentioned halibut, included twenty-two dogfish, a few mackerel and two wolffish. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

Dick Lyle (NY) was far and away high hook. He was the Dick Lyle that fished with me years ago with a fish a cast. He released seventy-two cod from 7 pounds to 21.5 pounds. And he caught a lot of haddock and many pollock. And he only used a jig! No fly! Some of the fish of his that I weighed included the 21.5 pound cod, a 14 pound cod, a 15 pound cod and a 17 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 12 pounds. Lew Hazelwood won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 86 pound halibut. This is the largest groundfish the Bunny Clark has ever seen. Some of his other fish included a 19 pound cod, a cod that weighed 20.5 pounds (the seventh largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far) and a 15 pound cod. The second largest fish was the 38 pound halibut caught by Neil Feldman. Neil was not in the boat pool. I took a picture of his with his nice keeper halibut. That picture appears on the left in this entry. The halibut is the second largest of the Bunny Clark season to date. Neil, as I mentioned, released another halibut of 12 pounds. He also caught a 5.5 pound haddock, a 13.5 pound cod, a 12 pound pollock and the largest cod of the day at 28 pounds. That cod is also the second largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. And it was the fourth largest fish of the trip. Bob MacNeil (NH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the third largest fish, the 34 pound halibut, the fourth largest halibut of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Some of Bob's other fish included a 5 pound haddock, a 6 pound haddock, a 14 pound pollock and a 16.5 pound cod. Donna Moran (NY) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the fifth largest fish of the trip, a 24 pound cod. This cod comes in at fourth place for the top five cod of the season so far. I took a picture of Donna with her steaker cod. This digital image appears on the right. Some of Donna's other good fish included a 12.5 pound cod, a 9 pound wolffish, a 13 pound pollock, another 12.5 pound cod, a 6 pound haddock and a double keeper catch that included a 9 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Miller caught the first keeper of the trip, a 3.5 pound monkfish, in the dark. So far, it's the Bunny Clark's third largest monkfish. Some of his other fish included a 17.5 pound cod, an 18.5 pound cod, a 14.5 pound cod, a 13 pound pollock and a 17 pound cod. He caught his share of haddock and pollock. Adam Towle (NH) caught a 13.5 pound cod and a lot of pollock. Bryan Tufts caught seven haddock on the last stop of the day. Some of the cod of his that I weighed included a 10 pounder and two cod of 14 pounds each. Bob Mayer caught the most legal haddock of the trip. I think the count was about twenty, more or less. The largest fish of his that I weighed was a 5 pound haddock and a 12 pound cod. Sean Devich only fished for a short time, spending most of his time helping Anthony fillet and bag fish. His two biggest fish in the fifteen minutes that he fished were a 16 pound cod and a 16.5 pound cod. Bryan Lewer (FL/ME) caught a lot of fish, as he normally does, but nothing of much size. I weighed an 11 pound cod for him but I know he caught bigger cod. Tim Rozan (ME) caught a lot of fish in the bow away from my scrutiny. The largest fish of his that I weighed was a 14 pound cod. He also caught a 5.5 pound haddock. Larry Kabat also caught a 5.5 pound haddock. His largest fish was a 15.5 pound cod. Merton Thompson (MA) also caught a 5.5 pound haddock. His largest fish was a 13.5 pound cod. Dan Wescom (VT) caught a 16 pound cod, his best fish. Mark Laroche (VT) landed the hard luck award for a couple of reasons. First, he was sea sick before the squall, the rest of the way to the grounds and most of the morning. Second, he fell on his favorite rod and snapped it in half at the reel seat! This rod had a beautiful butt wrap that took hours to make, very unique. I felt bad for him. He recovered for most of the fishing and gaffed the largest pollock of the trip that I assumed was his fish, a 15 pounder.

I was sponsored by three people today for my involvement in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity cycling event taking place the first Saturday of August to collect funding for cancer research and care with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. These people and their donations are as follows: Bob MacNeil for a generous $140.00, Bryan Tufts for $25.00 and an anonymous donor who gave a generous $135.00. Thank you all so very much for your generosity and support of my work to help cancer patients. Some day it could be you or me! I very much appreciate your help.

Wednesday, Stage 11 of the Tour de France, July 12, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was good in haze. By 8:00 AM, the fog had rolled in along the shore producing poor visibility looking out to sea. Ashore, the fog hung around for part of the morning but quietly left us as quietly as it showed up. There was no wind all day. This was the first day of the season that the charter sailboats in Perkins Cove had to use the engine in order to take patrons sailing! The sky was a mix of sun and clouds with mostly sunny conditions prevailing. During the late afternoon/night, thunder storms passed by Ogunquit but never went over us. The visibility in the afternoon was good in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 83F. It was humid and, somewhat, uncomfortable. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots or less and then died. There was no wind for the rest of the day, including the ride home. The ocean was flat calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 79F in the shade, influenced by the calm ocean creating a mirror of sorts reflecting the sun's heat everywhere. It was also humid, making it uncomfortable to fish. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was light. The visibility ranged from two to five miles in fog and haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing was excellent (the calm ocean and lack of current), the catching was very good and landings were good (dogfish), overall. I thought the bite was very good considering having conditions that are conducive for a "non-bite" situation. Most good sized fish landed were market cod, fifty fish from 5 pounds to 12 pounds. Legal landings also included forty-two pollock, sixteen haddock and eight cusk. Released fish included eighty-six dogfish, a wolffish, a redfish and the, previously mentioned, cod. Drifting was the boating method. All terminal gear worked the same.

I didn't ask Captain Ian who was high hook. I forgot. John Andreychak (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Peter Jaskievic (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Mike Walsh (NY). Mike also caught a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Nelson Dumont (ME) caught the first fish that was significant enough to be weighed, a 10.5 pound pollock. Ralph Small (NY) caught the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds. Mike O'Sullivan (CT) landed a 12.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Brad Roche (NJ) caught a 14 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Rich Burke (NH) boated a pollock that weighed 13.5 pounds. Aaron Tinard (CT) landed the hard luck award for being the sole angler without a legal sized fish! He's probably the first angler in many day/extreme trips to do this. Ouch!

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind was variable in direction. The ocean was calm all night. The tide (current) was light. The air temperature was a cooler 70F, for a high. The visibility ranged from five to eight miles in haze. The sky was overcast all evening. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing was excellent, the conditions for it unbeatable (including the air temperature). The catching was good on the first drift and then shut right off! The thunder storms (air pressure gradients) in the area probably influenced this phenomenon. Landings were poor. Legal landings included a cusk, a haddock and a red hake. Released fish included a 4 pound cod, a few smaller cod, a single pollock and four redfish. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Allen Amery (VT) was high hook with the most fair sized fish, two. They were the Bunny Clark's first half day haddock of the season at 2 pounds and a 3 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip. Tracey Moretti (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cod caught by Dave Hall (MA). Joe Viseth (ND) landed the hard luck award for no other reason that Ian could see than his need for a shirt to match his hand bag!

Thursday, Stage 12 of the Tour de France, July 13, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. Ashore, the wind piped up a bit out of the northeast and blew ten knots and, then, fifteen knots. At 7:30 AM, it started to rain. Light at first, it became steady and hard. It rained all morning. By noon, it was tapering off. The rain was done for the day by 1:00 PM. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. The wind decreased in velocity. By sunset, there was no wind at all. The viability over the ocean went from good, to poor in rain and haze to good or better than that by the end of the day. The highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit was 68F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the weather was much the same. The wind was out of the east northeast at fifteen knots, more or less. Seas were chops of two to four feet, and more later. It rained for most of the trip. In the morning it was heavy at times. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from one to three miles in rain, haze and fog. The sky was overcast for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing was fair with the conditions, the catching was good to very good but landings were just good. Landings could have been better had the fishing been better and the dogfish were out of the picture. Eleven anglers were sea sick while some others were helping those who were ill. At any time today there were only six anglers actually fishing. Most legal fish caught were medium sized pollock. In fact, most of the larger fish caught were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five haddock. Released fish included quite a few dogfish and fifteen market cod from 5 pounds to 9 pounds. They made two anchor stops. That was all that was needed. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Meegan Russell (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9 pound cod caught by Brandon Bereria (MA). Christian Colombo (MA) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: One of the customers on the boat told Ian that "I'd rather roof your house for free [than be fishing out here in this weather] and I'm afraid of ladders." Glen Taylor (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing a jig. There were too many heavy hurlers to give the shirt to one individual!

I received a very generous $300.00 donation from Herb & Pam Cook (NY) sponsoring me in the charity ride for a cancer cure called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The event, an 192 mile cycling ride, is slated to go off on Saturday, August 5, 2017. Thank you so very much for your heart felt and generous support for me, help for those with the disease and hope for those who are diagnosed in the future. I really appreciate you being on board with me on this even if you can't be aboard on the Bunny Clark! All the best to you both!

Friday, Stage 13 of the Tour de France, July 14, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly cloudy with the clear patches, there was no wind to speak of, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, the day was cool and overcast. I thought we might get some rain but there was nary a sprinkle. The air temperature hung around the 60F mark most of the morning before rising to 68F by 2:00 PM. I don't believe it ever got any higher than that today. The wind was light from the northeast. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots or less. Seas were long swells of three feet or so under a calm surface. The air temperature hung above 60F. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good today. Most good sized fish caught today were pollock, haddock were second and market cod were a distant third. Released fish included twenty-five market cod, forty-five dogfish and one wolffish. The boating methods were drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked equally well.

High hook could not be determined today. Marc Drozdowski (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 6 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This double comes in at number four for the top five doubles of the season to date. The 20.5 pound pollock is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of the fishing season so far. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Dan Potyrala (MA). They were both pollock. One weighed 17 pounds and the other weighed 16 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Shantell Drozdowski (PA) landed an 11 pound pollock, the first fish worthy of a scale today. Kristina Ciejka (MA) landed the hard luck award for not feeling herself on the trip.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, there was no wind. The ocean was flat calm all night. The tide (current) was very light. The air temperature was a cooler 63F, for a high. The visibility ranged over twenty miles. The sky was overcast all evening. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good as were the landings. It was our most successful evening half day trip of the season, to date. Most legal fish landed were cusk, by far. Legal landings also included one redfish and five cunners. Released fish included a 6 pound cod, a few sub-legal cod, a few sub pollock and a couple of redfish. They drift fished all evening.

Dave Hatton (MA) was high hook with five cusk. His two biggest weighed 7 pounds and 6.5 pounds. Dave's 7 pound cusk tied for the second largest fish with three other cusk caught that were also 7 pounds each. The anglers who also caught cusk of 7 pounds included Cass Fabbie (NY), Chris Lengyel (MA) and Andrew Lengyel (MA). Andrew also landed the second largest fish of the trip, a 9.5 pound cusk. Danielle Miller (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cusk. She also caught a 6 pound cusk and a cusk that weighed 4 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: And then there were the kids. Eight year old Tom Logan (MA) caught a 6.75 pound cusk as well as a 4.5 pound cusk. Eight year old Mike Lengyel (MA) caught a 5.5 pound cusk. Eight year old Will Hatton (MA) caught two cusk of 3.5 pounds each. Eight year old Andy Hatton (MA) caught a 6 pound cusk. Jon Busch (NY) caught the 6 pound cod and released it. Mike Hatton (MA) landed a 5.5 pound cusk. Carolyn Piwowar (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip!

I received three donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research and care. Those donors and their donations included Dan Potyrala (MA) for 30.00, Dr. Ralph & Eleanor Small for a generous $100.00 and a very generous $250.00 from Charlie & Linda Nickerson through their Law Offices of Charles L. Nickerson. Thank you all so very much for your participation in my fund raiser. I'm humbled with your support and grateful for your generosity.

Saturday, Stage 14 of the Tour de France, July 15, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be running the full day trip today. Alas, we had nary an inquiry. Of those who talked about going on this day, the rainy weather predicted made them want to sail on any other date! The wooden anchors have been out way too much this season.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good or excellent. Ashore, there was very little wind, if any, all morning. The ocean along the coast was flat calm. The visibility was very good. The sky was overcast all morning and through the early part of the afternoon. The clouds cleared out by 3:00 PM and introduced us to a new sunny day. The wind started blowing lightly out of the south at 2:00 PM. There might have been eight knots of southerly wind later in the afternoon. The highest air temperature that I saw was 73F. The visibility was nearly excellent but dropped to good and very good in developing haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 60F).

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the south southeast. The ocean was calm all evening. The tide (current) was very light. The air temperature was a cooler 64F, for a high. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles. The sky was mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was good for half the trip and landings were a bit off tonight. Most fish caught were sub-legal cod. Two of them were over twenty-four inches. Kept fish included two cusk and one redfish. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait. We had the problem we have with so many night trips; if you decide to go to a spot that you think will be good and it isn't, there isn't time enough to make up the difference. And that was what happened this evening. Also, the bite, like last night, seemed to shut down on the last spot.

Megan Fehr (MA) was high hook with the most good sized fish, two. One was a 5.5 pound cod and the other was a 4.75 pound cusk. She won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, the 5.5 pound cod. Jamie Munks (NV) caught the largest fish, a 10.5 pound cusk but did not enter the boat pool. The third largest fish was a 5 pound cod caught by Clive Roberts (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Laurie Hirst (ME) landed the hard luck award for spending the most time of any angler stuck on bottom.

Sunday, Stage 15 of the Tour de France, July 16, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good in some haze. Ashore, it was a perfect day. There was no wind in the morning. By 1:00 PM, a southerly wind developed that just ruffled a flag. By 3:00 PM, we had about eight knots of southerly wind. This wind died out after sunset leaving the ocean calm. The sky was clear with few clouds all day. The air temperature reached a high of at least 80F in Ogunquit. The visibility was good, at least, in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable. The ocean was calm for the whole fishing period. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The visibility ranged to eight miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was sunny and clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64.7F.

Even thought the ocean was like setting the boat on a table, the fishing was only good to very good because of the strong tide. The catching was just good today. Landings were fair. Legal fish included thirteen haddock, seven pollock, one cusk, three cunners and one monkfish. Released fish included six cod from 5 to 10 pounds, one wolffish and twenty dogfish. Drifting was the boating method of the trip. Everyone used bait. No jigs today.

Ralph Small (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. Nuala Kinsella (MA) caught an 8 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. Jared didn't weigh another fish, thinking he would get a larger one later in the day. That didn't happen. Patricia Kinsella (MA) landed the hard luck award for losing a big haddock on the surface!

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at eight knots or less. Seas were chops of about a foot. The air temperature was 70F. The visibility was very good, at least. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing was, again, just good because of the stronger than normal current. The catching was fair to good. Landings were just fair. Legal fish included two cusk. There were also two cod over twenty-two inches long, plus a few other sub-legal cod. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait.

Carlos Camargo (NH) caught the largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. Carlos did not enter the boat pool. Todd Cosgrove (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 4.25 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 4 pound cusk caught by Jerry Schartner (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Lemuel Chamberlain (NC) caught a 3 pound cod, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Nicki Gould (PA) felt under the weather and received the hard luck award for her malady.

Todd Cosgrove donated $35.00 to join the group of sponsors supporting me in my cancer fund raising efforts with an 192 mile cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Todd felt very strongly about how important it was to do what I do. And I certainly appreciate the heart felt words. Thank you so much, Todd. Very much appreciated!

Monday, Tour de France Rest Day, July 17, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was good in some haze. Most of the morning was calm along the shore with very little wind. By noon, the wind was blowing out of the south. The southerly wind blew as hard as, maybe, ten knots at the most. The sky stayed sunny all day in a mostly clear sky. The visibility was good in haze. The air temperature reached a high of 81F. It was fairly humid but not over the top. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five knots all day. The ocean was calm. The visibility ranged from five to ten knots in a thick haze. The air temperature reached a high of 71F in the shade. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was a mix of sun and overcast conditions. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was very good (the current), catching was very good and landings were very good. Overall, it was a very good day, of course. Most good sized fish were pollock. They were also the most prevalent legal fish caught today. Legal landings also included twenty-seven haddock and five cusk. Released fish included sixty-five cod from 5 pounds to 13 pounds and sixty dogfish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Mark Cote (ME) and Brian Tufts (FL) shared high hook status today. They were so close that it wasn't worth counting fillets. It never is! Mark's best catch was a double that included a 10 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Brian also caught a double in pollock as well. His double included a 20.5 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. To date, this is the Bunny Clark's largest double of the fishing season. The pollock is tied for the sixth largest pollock of the fishing season, so far, and it was the second largest fish of the trip. Bob Richard (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound pollock. This fish is the Bunny Clark's third largest pollock of the fishing season so far. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest double keeper catch of the fishing season to date. Ian also weighed a 10 pound pollock that Bob caught. The third largest fish was a 19 pound pollock caught by Mitch Myers (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Ed Setzer (NY) caught the second fish to be weighed, a 10.5 pound pollock. Mark Weldon's (NH) best fish was a 12 pound pollock. Tyler Sands (NH) caught the largest cod of the day at 13 pounds. Trevor Sands (NH) caught a 14.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Mark Hines (NY) landed a 15.5 pound pollock, the largest of the fish he landed. Mike Lopez (NH) landed the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 17.5 pound pollock. He had already caught a 15.5 pound pollock earlier in the trip. Jaime Machado (NH) boated a 12 pound pollock. David Guertin (OH) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. This is the second day that David has fished with us, his second trip, ever, with us. I think he liked it. Monique Hill (NH) caught a 13 pound pollock, her largest fish. She also landed the hard luck award for being the sole (soul?) hurler on the trip. She recovered enough to eat a banana, that she brought with her, on the way in! A banana. Jesus! Imgine what they would have caught if she had left the banana at home!

I received a $25.00 donation sponsoring me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to raise money to cancer research today. The donation was from Monique Hill and the Sands Gang. Thank you all so very much for your gift to those who rest their hopes on getting well with better research. Every dime makes a difference. And every person who donates spreads the good work of hope to those who truly need it. Thank you so very much for your support!

Monday, July 17, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston, Captain Jared Keniston, Captain Bryan Lewer and I ran the Ultra Marathon trip today.

At 9:00 PM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze.

We left Perkins Cove at the same time that we left on the SOFT a week ago. It was hazy and a bit choppy as we came out through the gate at 10:00 PM. I steered out for the first half hour. I needed that half hour to cement my game plan, fill out what I could fill out on the Federal Vessel Trip Report, adjust the electronics, collect the boat pool and make sure everyone was situated. When I had finished what I needed to do at the wheel, Captain Ian Keniston took over. I retired to a bunk and went to sleep. Ian told me that he had two to three foot chops until he left Platts Bank in his wake. After that, the seas dropped to a foot or so and the helm was much easier to handle. At the same time, the visibility became poor in fog. He carried dense foggy conditions all the way to the first fishing spot.

Tuesday, The Ultra Marathon, July 18, 2017

It was still dark when Ian had someone russell me out of the bunk. The fog was black thick, the wind was about five knots or more out of the southeast, there was a one foot chop and I couldn't wait to start everyone fishing.

On the grounds, the wind continued out of the southeast at five knots or more with a one foot chop. By sunrise, however, the wind was dropping significantly. By 6:00 AM the ocean was calm. The ocean remained calm or nearly so until we started to take the trip back home. We had southerly wind up to fifteen knots with seas in chops of two to three feet. But this wind abated too and dropped to ten knots or less where it remained for the rest of the ride. The fog stayed with us all day giving us a half mile of visibility at most. The fog lifted about five miles inside the fishing grounds. We enjoyed visibilities of ten to twenty miles for the ride back to Perkins Cove - until a mile off the Cove, where we encountered black thick fog along the shore. The tide (current) ranged from light in the morning to moderate after noon. The air temperature reached a high of 71F but increased to 76F at the helm for the ride home. That was a little warm for me. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.6F, the highest water temperature we have seen this season so far. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 68F).

We started to fishing in the dark. The drift was nearly perfect. The first fish was a 43.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake caught by Dan Killay (VT). I thought; "Here we go!". But, except for a couple of small hake, we never saw another hake until a few hours later. We did catch a pile of cusk. And the deeper we drifted the bigger they got. I don't think we have had a season for many years where the top five cusk were over 20 pounds. But we did so in two drifts today! We also caught a 27 pound barndoor skate (thank you, Steve Selmer - I took a picture of Steve holding is prize before releasing the skate. The digital image appears upper left.), our first of the season, and hooked about a 35 pound mako shark. I first noticed the shark actively swimming, fast, darting in and out of the fishing lines looking for anything to eat. At first I thought it was a porbeagle but it was way more active, acting more like a small tuna than a shark. Ray Westermann (MA) dropped a bait in front of it and got an immediate response! That little shark took the bait quicker than I would have ever imagined and flew off with it. Ray put his thumb on the spool of the reel only briefly and snapped that fish off so fast it would have made your head spin. It happened so fast you could have missed it if you weren't looking directly at the shark. I laughed. The rest of the day was filled with surprises.

The fishing was damn near excellent, the catching was very good and landings were very good, excellent for size. Most good sized fish caught were pollock, by far And we caught quite a few white hake but not as many hake as we released good sized cod. Legal landings also included twenty-four cusk, thirty-four haddock (we only caught three sub-legal haddock all day), a halibut and a whiting. We had our first two blue shark hookups. One of these fooled me into thinking it was a small tuna or a halibut for the first five minutes. Released fish included twenty-one dogfish and three halibut. We drift fished most of the day. We did try the anchor. All terminal gear worked well but I think we would have done much better on the haddock had there been some bait fishermen aboard.

I couldn't tell you whom was high hook. If I were to guess I would say it was Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA). But I couldn't possibly know that for sure. However, he was never left out at any phase of today's fishing. It didn't matter where we were or what we were doing, he always caught fish. His best fish, in my opinion, was a 23.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the fishing season to date. He caught his first halibut, an 8 pounder that was released almost as soon as he caught it (no pictures). He caught two Maine state trophy white hake. One weighed 30 pounds and the other was 27 pounds. And he caught a lot of pollock, some haddock and another Maine state trophy cusk of 14 pounds.

Tim Rozan (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest boated fish, a 68 pound Maine state trophy halibut. Unfortunately, we got into the same mess we got into last week. We had already caught a legal halibut not an hour or so before! The Federal law states that you can only keep one halibut per boat per trip. I did however get a great picture of Tim before we had to dispatch this fish. This digital image appears on the right. Luckily for us the fish made about six or seven runs from top to bottom making it easy (it was all played out) to get into the boat and easy to handle once in it! This is our second largest halibut of the season and the third largest Bunny Clark halibut of all time! Tim also caught a 16.25 pound sub-legal halibut much earlier in the trip on the same jig he caught the big one on. This is the third halibut that Tim has caught on the Bunny Clark. He had never seen one caught before he caught his first one! He also recorded the Bunny Clark's largest double keeper catch of the season to date on this trip. His double included a 29.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 9 pound white hake, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Some of his other fish included a 34 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 13 pound pollock and a 14 pound cod. It was a good day to be Tim Rozan!

Dick Lyle (NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 53 pound Maine state trophy halibut. Apparently, the practice on the SOFT paid off. He had hurt his knee and probably shouldn't have been on the boat (as well as using up all his vacation days at work) but he still found time to make the Ultra! Sometimes these extra efforts pay off. Dick caught the most cod, again today. Open bottom drifting, Dick can't be beaten. His largest hake was a 28 pound Maine state trophy.

Captain Bryan Lewer (FL/ME) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 47.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is the largest white hake that Bryan has ever caught. He has caught two 46 pound hake with me in previous years. It's also the largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season and the largest hake we have seen since Guy Hesketh (CT) caught his 48 pound Maine state trophy white hake on June 28, 2012! I took a picture of Bryan with his huge white hake. This digital image appears on the left below the other two posted images in this entry. He also caught our third largest white hake of the season with one that weighed 41 pounds, today. Some of his other good fish included a 22 pound Maine state trophy cusk and a 21.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, our second and third largest cusk of the season to date. He did catch another hake of 23 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 16 pounds.

Dan Killay landed our fourth largest fish of the trip, a 43 pound Maine state trophy white hake, mentioned previously. This is the largest hake he has ever caught and it's, currently, our second largest white hake of the fishing season. He boated this fish before 4:30 AM. Some of his other good fish included a 34.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 23.5 pound white hake and a 16.5 pound cod.

Lewis Hazelwood (MA) didn't catch another halibut but he was fishing right next to Dick Lyle when Dick caught his, in Kunz corner. What Lewis did do is catch the most pollock today. A lot of doubles. We did not stay on the pollock that long today, it wasn't that type of trip. But Lewis seemed to find them even if they weren't supposed to be there. His list of good fish included our fifth largest cusk of the season so far, a Maine state trophy of 20.5 pounds. I also weighed a 16.25 pound white hake of his, an 18 pound white hake and a 14.75 pound pollock.

Steve Selmer (NH) caught the most "counters" today. He started with the 27 pound barndoor skate, our first of the season. Along the way, he also caught a 21 pound Maine state trophy cusk, our fourth largest of the fishing season to date, a 35.25 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 30.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 38 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the Bunny Clark's fourth largest white hake of the fishing season so far, a 23 pound white hake, a 15.5 pound cod and a 16 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Mark Larocca (NY) caught an 18.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, a 15 pound Maine state trophy cusk and a 27.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his three largest fish. Ray Westermann, right after losing that small mako, landed a 19.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk. Some of his other fish included a 36 pound Maine state trophy white hake, a 23 pound white hake, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake and a 14.5 pound pollock. Like Griff, he caught fish consistently all day long. Dave Miller (MA) caught our largest cod today. It weighed 21.25 pounds, the only steaker of the trip. He also caught the largest haddock of the day at 5.2 pounds. Dave's largest fish was a 37 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the Bunny Clark's fifth largest hake of the season to date. Two of his other good fish included a 13 pound Maine state trophy cusk and a 24.5 pound white hake. Dave Gray (VT) landed a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his largest fish. Another hake of his weighed 21 pounds. He caught several good sized haddock in a row. And he was the first of the 2017 Bunny Clark season to fight a blue shark after hooking it on the way up from bottom (the shark grabbed a fish Dave had on the line). Dave has fished with me every season since I started taking people fishing in 1976. And I was thrilled yesterday when I saw him at the dock waiting to sign the position sheet; I had left his invitation open ended in case something came up. Adam Towle (NH) caught a lot of fish today. But the largest he boated was a 21 pound white hake.

Wednesday, Stage 17 of the Tour de France, July 19, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, it was impossible to tell if the sky was clear above the fog enshrouding the coast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog extending inland a quarter of a mile. We had the fog with us all morning and into the early afternoon. By 3:00 PM, the fog had backed away from the shore. By 5:00 PM, the fog was gone with no evidence left behind. There was little wind, if any, during the morning. A southerly wind started to blow by mid afternoon. That died out a couple hours later leaving the ocean flat calm and the flags limp. The air temperature in Perkins Cove reached a high of 81F. The visibility was good in the late afternoon through the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 67F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 93F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind in the morning; the ocean was calm. After noon, the wind started to blow out of the south. Five knots was the highest wind velocity attained. The ocean remained calm. The air temperature reached an uncomfortable 78F, the highest air temperature on the grounds this season to date. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged from tight to a mile in fog. The sky appeared overcast, with the fog. The water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing, catching and landings were good to very good all day. Most good sized fish landed were pollock, the most prevalent legal fish, by far. Legal landings also included three mackerel, twelve haddock and a cunner. Released fish included nine dogfish, twenty cod over 5 pounds and four skulpins. Drifting was the boating method. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Courtney Thacker (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by Matt Mancino (China). Lauren Collins (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 13 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Tessier (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock, one of the first ones to be weighed today. Jason Colburn (VT) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bobby Morin (VT) caught an 11 pound pollock. Tom Tatko, Jr. (NY) landed a pollock that weighed 12.5 pounds. Nathan Gillespie (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting green around the gills, and then some.

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind was light and variable in direction. The ocean was calm. The air temperature was 75F. The visibility ranged to eight miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was very good, catching was excellent (if you included dogfish) and landings were fair to good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included two cusk, five mackerel and three cunners. Released fish included twelve cod, nine redfish, sixty-five dogfish and a haddock. Drifting was the method. Everyone used bait.

Victoria Reynolds (NH) was high hook with two legal fish, a 2.75 pound pollock and a 4 pound pollock. Seven year old Brody Mosher (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound cusk caught by Holden Blais (OH). Jeff Corstairs (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 4.25 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Scott Houle (MA) caught a 2.5 pound pollock, one of the first fish to be weighed. Mike Reynolds (NH) caught a pollock slightly smaller at 2.25 pounds. Olivia Houle (MA) boated a 3 pound pollock. Ryan Mosher (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting stuck by a dogfish spine while handling the small shark. Ouch!

Mark LaRocca (NY) gave me a deep water cusk fillet from yesterday's trip. I had Tom Sullivan, the chef at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., bake it with a tomato based lobster stuffing for lunch yesterday. It was so good (and I ate so much because of it) that I couldn't eat the Dick Lyle halibut dinner Deb prepared for me this evening! On the right is a picture of Dick Lyle and his halibut from yesterday's trip. The digital image on the left is a shot of Mark holding the 18.5 pound cusk, part of which I enjoyed today!

Thursday, Stage 18 of the Tour de France, July 20, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was good in some haze. Ashore, the sky was clear in the morning. High clouds gave us a milky sky after noon with a hazy sun. After 4:00 PM, we had thunder showers with little lightning and thunder. Those were gone by 6:00 PM leaving us with a nice warm night and clear skies. The air temperature rose to 85F, at least. It was humid as well, making it a bit uncomfortable. The wind was light all day with a slight increase to ten knots around the afternoon showers. The visibility was good to very good in haze for most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west and then died out. The ocean was calm for the trip. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 75F in the shade of the canopy top. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen knots. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good overall. Most good sized fish were pollock. They were also the most prevalent fish by far. Haddock landings were up today with a total count of thirty-even and a cull of one legal fish for every two caught. Legal landings also included five mackerel and a cunner. Released fish included eighteen dogfish and twenty cod over 5 pounds. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Joe Snide (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Auielijus Gricius (ME). A 12.5 pound pollock was the third largest fish. It was caught by Chris Keeler (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Keeler (MA) caught the largest cod. It weighed 11.5 pounds. John Keeler (MA) caught an 11 pound cod. All the cod were released, of course. Kyle Brassard (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jon Dobbs (NJ) caught an 11 pound pollock. Mike Goulet (MA) landed a 10 pound pollock. Mike Keeler (MA) also caught a 10 pound pollock. Mark Konish (NC) caught a cod that weighed 10.25 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind was variable in direction from five to ten knots. This was because of various small low pressure cells and remnants of thunder storms making their way off shore. Seas were chops of one to two feet. It rained for about a half hour. The tide (current) was strong. The air temperature was 73F, for a high. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The sky was mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was good (the current/rain), catching was good and landings were good. Legal landings included seven pollock, three red hake and one haddock. Landings could have been better had everyone used jigs and cod flies. Instead, only bait and cod flies were used. Released fish included five dogfish and a few sub-legal cod and pollock. They drift fished and anchored.

Ed Socha (MA) was high hook with all but the only two other legal fish that were caught. These fish included a 3 pound pollock, a 2 pound haddock, a 3 pound pollock, a 3.75 pound pollock, another 3 pound pollock and a pollock that weighed 9.5 pounds. Ed won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, that 9.5 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish (the 3.75 pound pollock). But five year old Austin Morse (NH) denied him the ace (the three largest fish) by catching a 3 pound pollock and tying Ed for third place. Austin also caught a 2.75 pound pollock. Only two anglers caught fish they could take home. Very odd. Gabby Marcello (NY) landed the hard luck award for being involved in most of the tangled lines.

I received several donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those wonderful people and their donations are as follows: Bruce & Sheila Wilson (FL) for $50.00 in a "egift", Captain Ed Snell (ME) for $25.00, also in an "egift" and Marty Nephew (NY) for $50.00. Thank you all so very much for your generosity and support. I appreciate your help very much!

Friday, Stage 19 of the Tour de France, July 21, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was light from the west northwest, the ocean was calm with a ruffled surface and the visibility over it was good to very good in some haze. Ashore, it was a sunny, still day with higher air temperatures but less humidity. The air temperature reached 92F in the shade in Perkins Cove at 1:00 PM. I didn't look after that. The wind blew out of the west northwest at light speeds. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was good. The sky was sunny all day with no sign of a thunder shower. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 88F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 90F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west and then died out, same as it did yesterday. The ocean was calm for the trip. The sky was sunny. The air temperature reached a high of 76F in the shade of the canopy top. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen knots. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71F.

The fishing was damn near excellent. Maybe not excellent because the air temperature was too hot. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. And bigger fish today overall. Legal landings also included twenty-five haddock (the cull was 1.5 sub-legal haddock for every legal haddock caught) and one redfish. Released fish included fifteen cod from 5 to 8 pounds and seven dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear did well today.

I never did ask who was high hook but it had to come out of the Nephew camp. The two Nephew's, Marty and Travis had the lions share of fillets. Travis Nephew (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock, the last fish to be caught before heading home from the fishing grounds today! He also caught a 10.5 pound pollock earlier in the trip. The second largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Norm Hill (GA). Jeremy Thomason (GA) caught the third largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Marty Nephew (NY) landed a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Clark Roberts (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two best. Emilio Mazzeo (ME) boated a 12 pound pollock. Clive Roberts (NH), himself, landed a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. Alison Roberts caught a 10 pound pollock, her largest, maybe. She did lose two good sized pollock on the surface, one of them as she was lifting it out of the water. So Alison dropped right down to the bottom again and caught a dogfish! For her luck, she received "the shirt".

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or so. The air temperature was 76F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 71F, the highest surface water temperature we have seen the season.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good, barely. Most legal fish landed were pollock of the small medium variety. Legal landings also included a cusk, two squirrel hake and three haddock. Released fish included three cod, twenty-one dogfish and a redfish. Anchoring was the method. All terminal gear had the same success.

Selina Rooney (VT) was high hook with three legal fish. Her largest was a 4.5 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. She caught this fish as part of a double that also included a 2.5 pound pollock on the same line at the same time. Selina also caught a 4 pound haddock. The haddock was a tie for the third largest fish of the trip. Sam Alley (VT) won the boat for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5.5 pound pollock. Dave Bobrowski (CT) tied with Selina for the third largest fish of the trip with a 4 pound pollock. Alexia Bobrowski (CT) landed the hard luck award for having the most tangled lines!

Saturday, Stage 20 of the Tour de France, the Race of Truth, a Time Trial, July 22, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the northwest, the ocean was calm with a ruffled surface and the visibility over it was good to very good in some haze.

Ashore, the sky was sunny and mostly clear for the first couple of hours after sunrise. Clouds started encroaching at 8:00 AM. We did see the sun at times but the sky was mostly overcast with kind of a smurry sun until 2:00 PM. The sky was overcast, with no threat of rain, from that time on and through the night. There was very little wind today, light enough to keep the ocean flat calm all morning and into the early part of the afternoon. A southerly wind flow developed at 2:00 PM but, along the shore, it never blew more than eight knots. And, in fact, the flags in Perkins Cove were limp by 6:00 PM and remained so at sunset and on into the night. The air temperature reached a high of at least 85F. It was more humid than yesterday but not oppressive. The visibility was good in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 62F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots or less for the whole time there. The ocean was flat calm all day, much like it was along the shore. The air temperature reached a high of 75F. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast while fishing. The surface water temperature reached a high of 70F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock but there were no pollock caught near the 10 pound mark, a first for I don't know how many weeks. Legal landings also included twenty-six haddock (there were almost twice as many sub-legal haddock caught today), one redfish, five cusk and three cunners. Released fish included two wolffish, fifteen cod from 5 to 10.5 pounds and seven dogfish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked equally well.

I did not ask Ian who was high hook. I'm not sure he could have told me. Alyssa Wright (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound wolffish. This is the largest wolffish the Bunny Clark has seen all season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of Alyssa with her wolffish while Jared held the fish for the camera. This digital image appears on the left. The second largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod caught by Alex Pendenza (NH). Seb Olsen (VT) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound wolffish.

Other Angler Highlights: Ron Perkins (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

We could not get enough warm bodies to make the evening trip today. Alas, the wooden anchors are out on a flat calm warm evening!

I received two generous donations sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both donations were for $100.00. One was from Rick & Kathy Henderson (MD) and the other was from Jim & Sue Slobard (IL). Thank you all so very much for your help and support. It means a great deal to me that you trust and believe as I do. All the best!

Sunday, Stage 21, Last Stage of the Tour de France, July 23, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten plus knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the sky was sunny all day. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots or more during the early part of the morning after sunrise. The wind was already backing off by 9:00 AM. By noon, the wind was ten knots out of the northeast. By early afternoon, the ocean along the shore was running a small swell from the left over chop of the morning and the surface was smooth. A light wind from the southeast was blowing which died out during the late afternoon. The visibility was excellent. I only looked at the thermometer once. At that time it was 73F. I don't even remember what the time was when I looked. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of four to six feet. And ride, right into the seas, on the way to the grounds, was not pleasant. By noon, the wind had hauled more easterly and had dropped in velocity. Seas were three to five when they left the fishing grounds to head back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.7F.

The fishing was not good (it was too rough to handle the equipment the way you would like & most anglers were sea sick today), the catching was good as were the landings. The last two categories certainly would have been better had the equilibrium thing been not so rampant. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. But, like yesterday, they were the small legal fish with no pollock of 10 pounds or better. Legal landings also included nineteen haddock and one cusk. No dogfish were caught and only fourteen market sized cod were released. They anchored and drift fished. Cod flies caught the most fish.

John Warden (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. Bob DiDonato (ME) was second hook, so I understood. Bob tied for the second largest fish with a 6 pound pollock. Hunter Colby (ME) also caught a 6 pound pollock. Hunter won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound cod. Holly Churney (NY) landed the hard luck award for being marked as the high hurler of the trip! Ouch. I have to say, she looked perfectly fine while getting off the boat. I would never have guessed that she was sea sick.

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five to, maybe, eight knots. Seas were swells of two or more feet under a smooth surface. The high air temperature for the evening was 65F. The visibility was very good. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing was very good, the catching also and landings were fair to good. Legal landings included three haddock, a pollock, a redfish, a cusk, a monkfish, two cunners, six mackerel and a whiting. Released fish included five cod over 4 pounds and one wolffish. Drifting was the method. Every angler used bait exclusively.

James O'Connor (CT) was the fisherman of the evening. He was high hook with the most legal fish, four, and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Some of his other fish included a 2.5 pound haddock and a 1.5 pound whiting. He also caught the only legal redfish. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by Matt O'Connor (MA). Connor Jenks (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 4.75 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Cameron O'Connor (CT) caught a double that included a 4 pound cod and a 3.5 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Joe Zoretic (TX) caught a 4.5 pound monkfish. Believe it or not this is the Bunny Clark's third largest monkfish of the season to date! Kevin Jenks (MA) caught a 4 pound cod. Jim O'Connor (CT) landed a 2 pound haddock. Billie Fronzaglio (ME) caught a haddock that weighed 2.5 pounds. Ed "PA" O'Connor (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer from the motion of the ocean.

Joe Zoretic (TX) did me a solid today by donating $25.00 to sponsor me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you, Joe! Very much appreciated!

Monday, July 24, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, the wind was very light out of the northeast, the ocean was calm and the visibility over it was excellent. The air temperature was 65F at 2:00 AM. The air temperature had dropped since that time. But it didn't stop dropping. By noon, the air temperature was 58F. The air temperature was 57F at 3:00 PM. At 6:45 AM, it started to sprinkle rain. This light rain continued throughout the morning. A steady rain developed at 1:00 PM. This steady rain continued throughout the afternoon and into the night. There was no wind before sunrise. We had northeast wind of fifteen to twenty knots by noon. This wind kept up through the afternoon and into the night. The visibility over the ocean was fair in precipitation for most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was ?F (with a low of ?F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was ?F with a low of ?F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at ten (on the ride out) to twenty knots (on the grounds) in the morning. Seas were three to four feet in chops. After noon, the wind hauled out of the east, dropped to fifteen knots and then increased to twenty-five knots, more or less. Seas went from four to six feet in chops. The air temperature ranged from 65F when they first arrived on the grounds to 60F in the easterly wind. The tide (current) was very strong. It rained the whole time they fished. It was a very hard rain at times. The visibility suffered for the rain and fog. One to three miles was the furthest they could see over the ocean today. The sky, of course, was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was poor. The sea conditions, the fog, the hard rain and the very strong current made it about as tough as it gets for anglers to hold bottom and keep out of the tangles. Thankfully, there were only twelve dogfish that were caught. Anymore dogfish would have made it impossible to fish along with the other physical conditions. The catching was good if you included sub-legal pollock, by far the most prevalent fish today. Landings were fair. Legal landings included seventeen haddock, thirty-seven pollock, one cusk and two redfish. Released fish included the twelve dogfish, one wolffish and twelve small market cod. Ian tried drift fishing and anchoring. Neither of these disciplines worked better than the other. All terminal gear worked about the same.

I didn't ask who was high hook. I should have. There were no fish that made the 10 pound mark. Thinking there would be eventually, Ian only weighed one fish, a 9 pound pollock. This fish, caught by Bruce Randall (NY) was the largest fish of the day and, with it, Bruce won the boat pool for the largest fish of the trip. Wayne Lamberton (VT) landed the hardest luck of trip award for deciding not to bring any rain gear with him. I don't believe anyone got sea sick today. I didn't hear of anyone. And no one looked it when getting off the boat at the end of the trip. It's too bad that such good fishermen had to be treated to such a hard fishing day. Depite this, everyone appreciated being out there, almost to a man/woman!

Not so Tim Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Anthony Palumbo and I were supposed to be running the full day trip today. I canceled yesterday afternoon when I realized the weather was just not going to be good enough to run the trip. It's one thing to be out there when the wind comes up after a calm ride out. It's a totally different thing to travel into four to six foot seas to get the fishing grounds and then try to fish in larger than normal seas with a moon current. The wooden anchors are out, at least for the day trip.

We are planning to run the afternoon trip, leaving the dock today at 4:00 PM.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.









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