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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Tuesday, October 23, 2018, 4:00 AM EDT



The Two Big Trophy Fish of Senator Mazziotti

I spend very little time exploring during the summer. Nor do I have the time. Once the marathon (longer) trips begin at the end of August, I have the time to do more. When I have regular anglers who I know can make up the difference in fish count later in the day after I fool around trying to find special fish, I try other stuff. Most anglers are interested. Some aren't. And for those anglers who don't care about, what I call, the special fish, I do the normal trip. The marathon trip on September 27, 2018 was a trip with many excellent anglers including Mike Schetter, the pollock king, Senator Tony Mazziotti (D-NY), Joe Columbus (MA), mister high hook, Dennis Reissig (NY), the hake king, Chris "Just put me on the fish" Tankred (OH) along with others who were happy to do whatever. It turned out fantastic, my opinion of course. We went to an area I had wanted to explore a little more and ended up with some beautiful fish. The two shots above were both taken of Tony Mazziotti during this trip. The shot left shows him holding his 25 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is our second largest cusk of the year. Ordinarily that would be our largest cusk of the season. Today's trip also yielded the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk ever, our largest cusk of the season so far! The shot on the right is a digital image of Tony holding his 33 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is our ninth largest hake of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. I expected to catch a big cod and some pollock here as well. That didn't happen. But that could have had something to do with the wind direction and not the fact that we were fishing on a deep very rocky bottom. Success is sweet, made sweeter by the fact that usually I fail on these expeditions!




Tim Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the annual Larry Reed & Crew marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 81F, the sky was partly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the west at less than five knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

The air temperature had cooled down to 78F by the time I had given the speech and we were ready to leave Perkins Cove for the fishing grounds. After leaving the gate behind I realized that the wind had hauled out of the northwest. But it was blowing just enough that there seemed to be no wind en route. The ocean was fairly calm with a following one foot chop. The visibility was good.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of north after daylight. Wind speeds got up to eight knots, or just enough to turn over a one foot chop, by 10:00 AM. But that wind started dropped as soon as it reached it's apex. By 1:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the northeast, but only lightly. The ocean was calm for that time all the way until we got back to Perkins Cove. We had a light southeast wind that chased us home. It was hot after noon, the air temperature reaching a high of 84F in the shade by 2:00 PM.. The humidity seemed to increase all day. The tide (current) was moderate but a little to strong to drift much.. The sky was mostly clear with a few clouds on the fringes of the horizon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 69.5F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 73F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 89F (with a low of 64F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 68F).

The fishing conditions were good overall. In order to qualify this statement I have to say that without the shark problem the conditions would have been excellent. We had problems on two fronts; the dogfish and the blue sharks. We lost quite a few jigs to blue sharks. But dogfish were the most prevalent species for at least two hours. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Haddock came in second place, one of the best haddock days I have had on the boat since the Ultra Marathon. The haddock cull was about 50/50, barely favoring the sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included twenty cusk, seven redfish and almost fifty mackerel. Released fish included over one hundred dogfish, 15 cod over 5 pounds, a wolffish, about forty sub-legal pollock, ten blue sharks and a handful of small cod. We anchored, mostly, but drift fished at different places. We seemed to find more blue sharks while drifting. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who, for sure, was high hook with the most legal fish. If I were to guess, I would say it was Larry Reed (ME). He had a fish on all the time he was fishing from dawn to closing time. They weren't all legal. And there were a lot of dogfish. But Larry caught a lot of fish. His largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Boo Whitten (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound pollock. Her second largest fish was a 10.5 pound pollock. She boated her big pollock on the next to last stop of the day. I took a picture of Boo with her big pollock. This digital image appears on the right. Jake Johnson (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 20.5 pound pollock. Jake caught his fish early in the morning and led the boat pool for almost the whole trip. The third largest fish was an 18.5 pound pollock caught by Trudy Iams (ME). She caught this fish as part of a double that also included an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

Other Angler Highlights: Eric Richards (ME) caught the largest cod double I have seen for quite a while. His double included a 15.5 pound cod and an 11 pound cod. He also caught the largest haddock we have seen in two weeks. His haddock weighed 5.5 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Andy Chicoine (ME) caught a double that included a 14 pound pollock and a 6 pound pollock. Bob Jones (ME) caught a pollock that got hit by a blue shark on the way up. I thought that it could have been a halibut but I had my suspicions from the start. He ended up with two thirds of the fish. The remains weighed 12.5 pounds. Two other good fish of Bob's included an 11 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Jim Iams (ME) landed an 18 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also lost three jigs, mostly to blue sharks. Ryan Richards (ME) caught the only wolffish. It looked to be about 8 or 9 pounds. Jim Morrell (ME) landed a 10.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Bryan Lucas (ME) landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs and catching the least number of legal fish!

I received a large donation from the Larry Reed Crew of $138.00 supporting me in my ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. I guess they passed the hat before meeting on the boat this morning. Thank you all so very much for your help and generosity. I appreciate it very much. But those with the disease appreciate it more! All the best until next time!

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo hosted the annual fall St. Lawrence River Rats extreme day trip charter today. Unfortunately, Tom Bruyere, the driving force on this charter and my former college roommate, couldn't make it because someone was sick in the family. But his son, Andrew made it. And I'm sure Andrew's heart wasn't into it as much as it normally would be.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about, you could hear the bell buoy plainly (the wind is usually out of the east or northeast when this happens) and the visibility over the ocean was good, at best, in haze. Ashore, the fog rolled in for a short time at 6:00 AM. This may have been the reason the sky was overcast earlier. The sky cleared by 7:30 AM. The visibility at that time was good. The wind blew out of the west all morning up to about ten knots. After noon, the wind hauled more southwest but no more than ten knots. The highest air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit, Perkins Cove, was 85F. The visibility was good in haze. The sky remained clear and sunny throughout the day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 71F). The record high temperature for this date in Boston is 93F which was last set in 1880. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 60F). The temperature value of 91F in Concord ties the previous record high for this date set in 1961 and, before that, in 1953. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 65F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less in the morning, increasing after noon to ten knots or so. The morning was calm. By afternoon, seas were chops of one to two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was hazy clear and sunny for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68F.

The fishing conditions were good overall, marred by the many dogfish that were caught, less that twice what we caught yesterday with three hours less fishing time, and the blue sharks. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Landings would have been excellent without the dogfish and blue sharks, one of our best days of the last two months. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five haddock, five redfish, five cusk and a white hake. Released fish included twelve short haddock, one hundred and eighty-five dogfish, two blue sharks that were brought right to the boat, eleven cod of 5 pounds or better and a few short pollock with some small cod. Drift fishing was the fishing method of choice but they did anchor on one spot. Everyone used jigs, jig sticks and flies except one angler.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. There was way too much going on and way too many anglers who are excellent fishermen to separate them by legal fish count. Pat McNamara (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound cod. We haven't seen a cod over 20 pounds since the trip on July 17, 2018. The second largest fish was a 19.5 pound barndoor skate caught by Warren Putnam (NY). This is the seventh barndoor skate that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Warren's biggest pollock weighed 12 pounds. The 12 pound mark was the figure set for the third largest fish today. There were two others who also caught 12 pound fish. Those anglers included John Gardner (NY) and Mike Kotash (NY). John's fish was a pollock. Mike's fish was a cod. Mike's biggest pollock weighed 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Petronio (NY) caught the most good sized fish today. Three. His fish included a 10.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and another 10.5 pound pollock. Kim Demers (NY) caught a 10 pound cod, the first fish of the trip that Ian weighed. It was Kim's largest fish of the trip. Jeff Bailey (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock, his best fish. Dan Liscum (NY) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his best. Chuck Stottler (NY) also caught a 10.5 pound pollock as his biggest fish. Bob Petronio may have caught the most fish that had needed a scale. But for every one of those bigger fish he lost a jig, three to be exact. And this got him the hard luck award!

I received a nice donation sponsoring me in this season's Pan-Mass Challenge, a bike ride that took place the first Saturday in August. Cancer never sleeps and I don't stop taking donations either. This donation was a generous $100.00 from Rick & Kathy Henderson (MD). They are regular patrons of Barnacle Billly's or, as I like to say, part of the Barnacle Billy's family. Thank you so very much, Rick & Kathy. I do so appreciate your support!

I had to change the oil in the engine this late afternoon. This kept me from greeting the anglers getting off the boat when the Bunny Clark returned. This was a bit disappointing but Anthony appreciated it as we were done much earlier than expected. Thanks for sailing with us, all you River Rats!

Thursday, September 6, 2018

This was a scheduled day off. Captain Ian Keniston had made plans to attend a function last winter assuming, as I did, that we would have a second deck hand by now. Alas, that hasn't happened. And I didn't want him to cancel his mini vacation. So the wooden anchors are out on the Bunny Clark today and I'm taking Ian's place as captain on tomorrow's extreme day trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 74F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. It was very humid today, the index over 70. The air temperature rose as they said it would. By noon, it was already 93F. In fact, I never looked at the thermometer again. It could have gone higher. I don't know. The sky was cloudless all morning but you could see a buildup of clouds on the horizon to the west. These clouds showed up on our doorstep at 2:00 PM and gave us rain, hard a times, with thunder and lightning. There was no hail as was suggested there might be. The rain lasted until 5:00 PM, sometimes light, sometimes hard. The air temperature remained warm throughout. By 6:00 PM, the air temperature had cooled down to a pleasant 75F. And the humidity index dropped as well. The visibility was good, less so in the rain. The sky remained mostly cloudy into the night. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 97F with a low of 74F). The temperature value of 97F in Boston breaks the previous record high for this date of 94F set in 1983. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 67F). The temperature value of 92F in Concord breaks the previous record high for this date of 91F set in 1998. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 92F (with a low of 66F). The temperature value of 92F in Portland breaks the previous record high for this date of 88F set in 1983, the first year of fishing with the Bunny Clark.

I spent the day at Barnacle Billy's. But very little time was spent on the floor as I had much desk work to do today. Besides orders and the normal office day to day, I also worked on the new Barnacle Billy's web site. I don't like to be in the office as much as I was but it's what I had to do. Tomorrow will be a bit tough because I have two hours of Barnacle Billy's stuff I have to completed before I step foot on the Bunny Clark tomorrow. It's going to be a long day.

Friday, September 7, 2018

Anthony Palumbo and I ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear with just a tiny sliver of a moon, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was exellent.

When we first left the Cove to head to the fishing grounds, I thought I might need more than a t-shirt. But, after a few miles, the air warmed up enough so that I didn't need anything extra. In fact, it was perfect weather for a t-shirt. We were able to go full cruise into a one to two foot chop with eight to ten knots of northeast wind. The visibility was excellent.

On the fishing grounds, we started off with ten knots of northeast wind and a two foot chop. Some of the seas were left over from a stronger wind earlier in the morning. The northeast wind diminished as the day progressed, as did the seas. When the time came to call the fishing day, the wind had left us and the ocean was flat calm with a left over glassy hubble. The air temperature reached a high of 69F in the shade. The humidity was gone, thankfully. The tide (current) was moderate but oblique to the wind - which made it a taxing drift. The sky was mostly clear in the morning and mostly overcast in the afternoon. The visibilty ranged to thirty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 67.2F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing conditions were good overall. The sideways current was a problem, as were the dogfish and blue sharks during the early drifting. The catching was good overall. Landings were very good on one spot where we caught two thirds of all our legal fish today. The fishing was just a pick everywhere else I went. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 5 or 6 pound class mixed in with a couple of bigger pollock. Legal landings also included twenty-four haddock, a redfish, four cusk and two squid. Released fish included twenty-four sub-legal haddock, twenty-one dogfish, two blue sharks, one cod of about 6 pounds, nine small cod and a handful of small pollock. We were forced to anchor for almost every stop. When anchored we caught very few dogfish, if any, and no blue sharks. Drifting was nearly impossible between the current, the dogfish and the blue sharks. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Norm Herrick (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish, a total count of fifteen. All were pollock except for one haddock. He was also the fisherman of the day as he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. I also weighed an 8 pound pollock for him early in the trip. Joe Figliuolo (RI) caught the second largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13.25 pound pollock caught by Jeff Crawford (DE).

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Luschen (NY) caught a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a 6 pound haddock that measured twenty-seven inches, caliper fork length. This fish would have weighed over 7 pounds in the spring. It also ties for the largest haddock in the last two months. I took a picture of Brian with his haddock. This digital image appears on the left. Diane Stickles (NY) was leading the boat pool most of the morning with a 9.25 pound pollock. She ended up beating her 9 pounder with a 12 pound pollock but not large enough to win the boat pool. Ghislaine Laflamme (QC) landed the hard luck award for tangled lines and getting involved in hooking some old lobster ground tackle. I was going to give her the shirt but she insisted that her husband, Andre, receive it instead! So that's what I did!

Norm Herrick donated $90.00 to help with my cancer fund raising with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Norm, and his wife LuAnne, have donated much money through me for the PMC over the years. Thank you very much, Norm. I very much appreciate the support.

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky remained mostly overcast all day. The clouds were thin and, at times, the sun would shine through a hazy patch, giving soft lighting. The air temperature never got out of the 60s, to my knowledge. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 67F. The wind blew out of the north at ten knots, dropping in velocity and coming out of the northeast late and light. There was no wind in Perkins Cove after noon, to speak about. The visibility was very good, at least. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 48F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 52F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten to twenty knots with seas in chops of three to four feet. Winds diminished over time and hauled more easterly after noon. Northeast wind speeds were about ten knots with two to three foot chops at 1:00 PM. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The sky was overcast for the trip. The tide ranged from moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were good at best. The sea state, the dogfish and the tide dropped the conditions to the lower category. The catching was very good to excellent (if you include the dogfish). Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included eight haddock, a redfish and a cusk. Released fish included three cod of 5 pounds or better, four short haddock, one hundred & twenty-five dogfish and a couple of short pollock. They anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies worked the best.

Nick Sacendola (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The second largest fish was 11 pounds. There were two. Both pollock. Brandon Ano (NY) caught one. Kevin Vieo (NH) caught the other. Kevin also caught the largest cod of the day at 10.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Barry Ano (NY) caught the first fish that could be weighed, a 9 pound pollock. Noah Buffum (VT) landed a pollock that weighed 8.5 pounds. Walter Stevens (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my cancer cycling event, the Pan-Mass Challenge. Kevin Vieo (NH) donated $40.00 while Kathy Hessefort Roy (NH) donated $25.00 through the PMC site in the form of a "egift". John Hessefort, Kathy's former husband, used to enjoy fishing on the Bunny Clark almost as much as I enjoyed having him on the boat. He was a good fisherman. But he was taken too early by the disease I am trying to fight in this fund raiser. Thank you, Kathy, for always thinking of me and what I do. And thank you, Kevin, for your generosity. Much appreciated!

Sunday, September 9, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. I canceled the trip on Captain Ian's suggestion that it was too sloppy to take anglers out. I agreed. Last time I let the boat go out in these conditions we had an angler who had a seizure complicated by the person's sea sickness. Better days are coming.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was mostly overcast with clear patches or maybe just thinner cloud cover (I couldn't tell in the dark), the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The day went back and forth with the cloud cover. We have very sunny periods, particularly in the morning, and overcast conditions. The clouds never got thick enough to make me think it was going to rain. But it did make me glance at the weather radar for confirmation. The wind peaked at seventeen knots at the closest weather buoy by mid morning, ten knots ashore. The wind dropped after that and hauled out of the southeast at eight knots or so. Seas never got to the three foot mark according to our closest buoy but got as high as 4.3 feet at the Jeffrey's Ledge buoy. The visibility was excellent throughout the day. The air temperature got up as high as 61F in Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 46F).

I spent most of the morning riding with the Maine Coast Cycling Club after working at the restaurant early to get order sheets printed. After noon, I worked on orders for Monday delivery. Sunday is a huge order day. But orders are much lighter this time of year than they are during the summer. I worked until 6:00 PM. After that, Deb and I came down to Barnacle Billy's and had lobsters for dinner. I retired early.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the extreme day trip again today. I canceled this trip yesterday after I listened to the NWS forecast. I'm not sure either day should have been canceled with the weather I saw yesterday and this morning's weather so far. Am I getting better with customer relations or am I just getting soft, or just old! Regardless, the wooden anchors are out again today and, possibly, tomorrow.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was mostly cloudy with some clear pieces, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots for the first part of the morning. After 10 AM, the wind hauled out of the east and then east southeast before noon. Wind speeds were sustained eighteen knots with gusts over twenty knots. Seas were white beards looking into the teeth of it from the parking lot. The air temperature in Perkins Cove reached 65F. It did not seem as cold as I thought it would be after this mornings air temperatures. The sky was cloud covered but thin enough to see the sun for most of the morning. There was never a patch of blue for the sun to shine through. It was always through the clouds. By 3:00 PM, the sky was overcast. At 4:00 PM, it started to rain. Rain was light and very periodic. It became more steady later in the evening. I was told this was the remnants of Hurricane Gordon that struck the Gulf of Mexico and went ashore. The visibility excellent in the morning, went to fair to good in the evening with the precipitation. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F (with a low of 46F).

I received a generous $100.00 donation sponsoring my cancer fund raising ride (cycling) with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donor was Joe Weaver (NY), one of my "older" regular anglers. Joe hasn't been out with me for a while. And he had no luck this year either, being blown out two days this week. Before he left he gave me this check. Thank you very much, Joe. I'm sorry I wasn't able to take you fishing. But it was good to see you just the same. I'm going to miss the abuse I was expecting to get from you!

Not So Tim Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. I hated to cancel it but cancel I did. It was going to be too rough to go to the fishing grounds in the weather that was anticipated.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, it was pouring rain, the wind was blowing out of the east at twenty knots, the wave height on Jeffrey's Ledge was 8.2 feet every eight seconds and the visibility over the ocean was fair in heavy precipitation, haze and, possibly, fog. By 7:30 or 8:00 AM, the heavy rain had stopped. It was misting with occasional light rain until around 10:30 AM. We didn't see another drop of rain for the rest of the day. The sky was overcast for most of the morning with peeks at the sun before noon. This kept up through the afternoon when, after 3:00 PM, the sky became mostly sunny. The wind was diminishing all morning after 5:00 AM. By 7:00 AM, the northeast wind was about fifteen knots with higher gusts. By 9:00 AM, there was hardly ten knots. The rest of the day gave us light and variable winds and big seas. Seas were still around eight feet every eight seconds at 10:00 AM. By sunset, seas had dropped to six feet, not as much as I would have thought with the lack of wind. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 75F. It felt warmer as it was very muggy and humid. For instance, I thought the air temperature had climbed to a value over 80F before I looked at the thermometer. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 57F).

Today was a make-up day or catch-up day at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. I'm usually on the boat on Tuesdays. Since I was ashore, I finished up many projects that, otherwise, would have been on hold for a few more days. So I was primarily in the office today and on the phone a lot. I called it quits at 7:30 PM and went home for dinner.

On this day in 2001, I was running the Bunny Clark. It was also a Tuesday. I was offshore on a marathon trip. While anchored on a spot catching pollock, one of our anglers hooked into a bluefin tuna of about 250 to 300 pounds. We got off the anchor and fought that fish for three hours, losing it right next to the boat. Our anglers were a charter from New York. Some were firemen. While fighting the fish we had strayed a few miles from the initial spot. We were just coming back to the edge where we had anchored, tail between our legs, when my analog cell phone started ringing. It was my father at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. He told me that a big passenger plane had just crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. I rarely was able to get a signal out there that far so I was surprised to hear it ring and to actually have a conversation. My father also told me that a plane had crashed into the Pentagon. With that last bit of knowledge, the phone went dead. I tried calling back but could not get a signal. I had a radio frequency scanner on the boat at that time for FM channels including cell phone frequencies and radio station frequencies. So I tuned it to the frequency of one of the National Public Radio frequencies to listen to the news. It was a somber moment. I'll never forget the feeling.

I received a very generous $500.00 donation from Connie Griffin (ME) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money to fight cancer (with the Jimmy Fund). The ride took place the weekend of August 4th but the fund raising continues throughout the year and cancer never sleeps. Thank you so very much, Connie, for such wonderful support and generosity. I do very much appreciate this.

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was fair precipitation, haze and fog. Ashore, it rained lightly, on and off, throughout the morning and for some of the afternoon. Basically, the afternoon was dry. And we had a period of sun. But the sky became overcast after 4:00 PM and remained so into the night. The air temperature was warm with a high of 68F in Perkins Cove that I noticed. But the humidity made it seem warmer. The wind blew lightly out of the northeast for a while but was very light with a calm ocean along the shore with a left over sea swell making it appear as if there were wind off shore. The visibility was good to very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 66F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at eight to twelve knots in the morning with a two foot chops over three to four foot short swells. After noon, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to five knots or less. The chops dropped to two and, then, one foot in chops over a two to three foot rolling seas swell. The ocean was glassy for most of the ride home. The air temperature rose to a high of 68F. The tide (current) was strong most of the day. The visibility ranged to fifteen or twenty miles in some haze. The sky was overcast. Ian didn't mention any rain. And, looking at the radar, they could have been just outside of the rain. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing conditions was good. It could have been better had the current been less, had the dogfish not been around and the seas a little less in the morning. The catching was very good for fish in general. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-six haddock, eight cusk and three mackerel. Released fish included twelve cod over 5 pounds, twelve short haddock, ninety-one dogfish and a couple small cod. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most fish.

I didn't ask who was high hook. But if Jeff Corey (MA) wasn't high hook, I can't imagine who was. To me, he was the fisherman of the day. He looked for all the world to be high hook with the fillets he walked off with and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. He caught the 19 pound pollock as part of a double that also included an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest double of the fishing season to date. Jeff also caught the third largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. Some of his other fish included an 11 pound pollock and the largest cod of the day at 14 pounds.

John Teehan (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. John also caught a 10 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Anthony Kilmer (TN) landed a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Duane Kilmer (TN) took the other tack and landed the hard luck award for being the high hurler of the day. In fact, he stayed down below all day to the point that Ian that he had a stowaway!

I had two anonymous donors give $25.00 each to sponsor me in this season's Pan-Mass Challenge today. Thank you, whoever you are, for your help and support. I appreciate it very much. But there are others who appreciate it so much more. All the best!

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, there was some humidity (making it feel a bit warmer than the air temperature), there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

We had no problem leaving Perkins Cove behind us this morning. In the back of my mind I thought we might have big swells to add to the confusion in the outer cove. But, aside from patches of sea foam on the water, there was really no evidence of large offshore swells. Five miles from the Cove it was a different story with three to five foot rolling seas. These swells got larger the further we got out. But we had good visibility the whole way, very little wind and the surface of the ocean was calm.

On the fishing grounds, we had sea swells of six to eleven feet. Long rolling things that only showed up on the sounding machine while anchored. The wind was light from the northeast, glassy calm over the swells after that and light northwest/glassy in the later afternoon and the ride home. The air temperature reached a high of 71F in the shade. There was a bit of humidity. The tide (current) ran like a river all day, very strong. This was the strongest current I have seen all year. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. In the morning, the sky was mostly overcast. We could see rain showers coming out of the clouds to the westward of us for most of the morning. Later morning we saw the sun, the afternoon started with overcast skies that gave way to a mostly sunny ride home. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 68.5F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing conditions were good overall. The current was a killer, creating tangles galore. The fishing conditions could have been almost perfect as we had very few dogfish and only a handful of blue sharks plaguing us. The catching was very good to excellent. Landings were very good overall. There was someone with a fish on the line all the time. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. But we also had the most haddock I have seen on a trip where I was the captain since mid July. The haddock cull was four to one, legal haddock to sub-legal haddock. Legal fish landed also included twenty-six redfish, ten cusk, two loligo squid and one white hake. Released fish included three dogfish, seven or eight blue sharks, forty-two cod between 5 and 22 pounds, eighteen barely sub-legal pollock and a handful of small cod. We tried drifting at first but it was just too strong to hold bottom. So we spent the day anchoring on every spot until late afternoon, when we tried the drift again and were successful That last drift only lasted a half hour as we had to get going back. All terminal gear worked equally well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook but it had to be either Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) or Ray Westermann (MA). Griff won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22 pound cod. I took a picture of Griff holding this nice cod with my iPhone just before he released it. This digital image appears on the left. Griff also caught the third largest fish, a 20 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 15 pounds. Ray had a 15 pound cod as his biggest fish. But he also had probably the most haddock. Ny Nhath (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 21.5 pound cod. Ny's largest pollock weighed 12 pounds. If I were a betting man, I would have bet that Ny was third hook right behind Ray and Griff.

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Gargan (NY) fished in the bow and had a cod that, at the time, might have been a pool contender. The fish looked to be around 14 pounds, more or less. He might have broken his line trying to get the fish aboard or it might have gotten off the hook at the surface. I was involved with another angler at the time. But it didn't matter in the long run as, an hour later, Griff caught the big one and we had already had a larger fish than 14 pounds already. Jim Jarvis (MA) caught the only white hake. It weighed 13 pounds. Ray Thomas (MA) caught an 18 pound cod and a 14 pound cod, his two biggest fish. Mark Randis (PA) caught one of the first bigger cod of the day today. It weighed 10.75 pounds. He might have caught a pollock of about the same size. Dan Nye (MA) caught a 10 pound cod, a 10 pound pollock and another cod of 10 pounds today. Dan was one of the higher hooks of the day as well. Ben Austin (VT) caught a 15.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Bill Otto (PA) caught a 16 pound cod, his largest fish. His largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Craig Belongie (MA) caught an 11 pound cod and a 10.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish, unless he caught a bigger cod that he didn't tell me about. He very well could have. He takes care of himself. Eric Rustin (MA) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bill Murphy (MA) caught a 14.5 pound cod, his largest fish. He also released two blue sharks with his jigs in their mouths. Mike "Stump" Stump (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the worst backlash/over-wrap in a reel that I have seen this summer or, maybe, the last few summers! On the bright side, his largest cod weighed 17 pounds and his largest pollock weighed 14 pounds, two nice fish!

Rich donated $20.00 to sponsor me in my cancer fund raising quest with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. It was a particularly thoughtful move as I forgot to mention this project in the morning's speech. Consequently, he was the only donor today as well (Sorry, Dana-Farber!). Thanks so much, Rich. Very kind of you. Always a great pleasure to have you aboard. Both, very much appreciated!

Friday, September 14, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The visibility didn't last. A half hour later the fog rolled in and never left us the whole day and all night. It was the foggiest day of the year today. There was no wind all day. No one got a chance to see the ocean along the shore at any time today unless you were standing at the water's edge. There were times in the morning where you couldn't see the footbridge over Perkins Cove from the deck of Barnacle Billy's. The air remained calm all day with no wind to write about. The sky appeared overcast throughout the day. Around 6:00 PM, we got a glimpse of the sun above the trees to the west. But this glimpse was thought a lighter layer of fog. Actually, four miles inland, the sky was clear with a bright sun. It was only along the shore that the fog was present. The high air temperature that I observed in Perkins Cove was 75F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew lightly out of the north (northeast?) in the morning but became nothing but variable during the later morning and afternoon. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The visibility was poor in black thick fog to an eighth of a mile. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The sky was overcast or seemed so in the fog. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were good. We seem to be stuck in this category daily for various reasons. Today's reasons: even though the tide had backed off from the last couple of days, the dogfish were thick as fleas on wild dog's back. So tangles were still up there in count, although not as bad as they could have been with an inexperienced crew. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, despite. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-nine haddock, five cusk, one white hake and a monkfish. Released fish included a barndoor skate, three cod of 5 pounds or more, a handful of small cod and pollock and over two hundred dogfish. They drift fished for the trip. The tide was too strong to anchor. There was just enough wind to temper the drift so that the lines hung better. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies worked the best.

I would suspect that Ray Westermann (MA) and Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) were high hook yet again. But I don't know this for sure. Ian didn't volunteer that information. They have a system working together. And it works. Griff won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound barndoor skate. Captain Ian took a picture of Griff with his fish. This digital image appears on the right. The second largest fish was a 20 pound pollock caught by Gabe Pearson (ME). Gabe also caught pollock of 10 pounds and one that weighed 12 pounds. Lane Winney (NH) caught the third largest fish, a 17 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jake Tessles (MA) caught the only white hake at 12 pounds. Donna Borges (MA) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, her largest fish. Tony Amaral (MA) landed an 11 pound pollock. Kevin Kozlowski (CO) boated a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. Peter Griffin (NY) caught the only monkfish. It weighed 4 pounds. Brian Hagedorn (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest. John Fairbanks (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs.

Saturday, September 15, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast (the sky had been fairly clear with stars an hour earlier), the wind was blowing out of the southwest at eight knots and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. Ashore, the fog hung around for the first half of the daylight morning but cleared up along the shore for the last two hours. The sky stayed overcast with very little wind. The ocean was flat calm along the shore. At 4:00 PM, the sky cleared and the sun showed. There were very few clouds after that. The fog backed off well out to sea so that you could see six miles out. Objects were hazy at six miles. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. But it felt warmer than that because the dew point was so high. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the fog was black thick in the early going. But the visibility improved to almost a quarter of a mile later in the trip. They carried the fog all the way home until about the six mile mark. The wind blew out of the west at barely a knot. There was no wind after noon. The ocean's surface was glassy calm over long rolling sea swells of three to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 64F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good. The tide was fine, the weather was fine but there were still quite a few dogfish which knocked the fishing down a category. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included sixteen haddock, two redfish and six cusk. Released fish included one hundred and fifty-two dogfish, one cod over 5 pounds, four short haddock and a handful of small cod and pollock. They anchored and drift fished. Cod flies caught the most fish.

I didn't inquire who was high hook. And that information was not volunteered. Pam Nelson (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. Ian took a picture of Pam holding her prize. This digital image appears on the left. Pam and her husband, Don, had their honeymoon on the Bunny Clark. I believe it was thirty-four years ago. I was the only captain in those days. The second largest fish was a 17.5 pound pollock caught by Matthew Lewandowski (NH). He caught this fish as part of a double that also included an 11 pound pollock. This is the seventh largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Laurie Plante (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Roland Cote (ME) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Rachel Molleur (ME) landed a pollock of 9 pounds. Matt Brodka (NY) boated an 11 pound pollock. Mark Fournier (VT) caught a 13.5 pound pollock. Logan Springer (NY) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single legal fish!

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the stars were bright in a crystal clear sky, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, we had no fog today. The air temperature was warm, reaching 70F by mid morning and a high of 81F in Perkins Cove. It was also hazy with Tim's "real feel" temperature of about 87F. Just as it seemed to be getting too warm, the air temperature and humidity seemed to drop a bit at 4:00 PM. It was a very pleasant evening in low to mid 70s. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was good. There was no wind all morning, light from the south in the afternoon. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind in the morning. The ocean's surface was flat calm. After noon, the wind blew lightly out of the south. That ocean, too, was calm. Underneath the ocean's surface there were long rolling sea swells of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 74F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was hazy clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good. The weather couldn't have been better. This alone pushed the conditions up to very good. The dogfish numbers kept the conditions down in the good category. Catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Today was the last day of haddock fishing so Ian wanted to please those who were aboard to catch them - which was everyone. The haddock cull was 60/40, favoring the legal fish. Legal landings also included a good number of pollock, forty-three cusk and one white hake. Released fish included twenty-eight cod over 5 pounds, over two hundred dogfish, two wolffish, a number of small pollock and a handful of small cod. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best for haddock. Otherwise, all terminal gear worked well today.

Bill Harding (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish including a pile of haddock. His largest fish was an 11.5 pound cod, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Mario Zach (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound wolffish. This is a tie for the tenth largest wolffish caught on the Bunny Clark this season. The second largest fish was a 14 pound wolffish caught by Jim Smith (NY). He also caught a 10 pound cod, the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool today. Robert Wilimczyk (NJ) caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Brodka (NY) caught an 11.5 pound cod to tie with Bill for the fourth largest fish of the trip. "Haddock Jack" Brouse (NH) landed the hard luck award for most tangled lines.

I received a very generous $500.00 donation supporting my fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donor is Betsy McLaughlin (NY) who has already donated $500.00 previously, this year and has helped me every year since I started riding in the PMC! Thank you so very much, Betsy. I am humbled and honored and so appreciate your sponsorship!

Monday, September 17, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, if there was wind it was out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was fair, at best, in off coastal fog. It only took a couple hours of daylight to rid the coast of the fog this morning. We were left with good visibility in haze. The air temperature rose more than it did yesterday, to a value of 86F in Perkins Cove. It was also humid. The sky was hazy clear with very few clouds and a hot sun. It was really a little too warm today. But knowing what is waiting for us in a couple of months, we took it with a smile. There was very little wind in the morning. By noon, the wind was out of the west southwest. At 2:00 PM, we saw ten to fifteen knots. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a comfortable value of 68F at it's highest in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was good. The sky was sunny in the morning and overcast in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were very good, the catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two redfish and two cusk. Released fish included thirty haddock (half were under 17 inches), forty-five dogfish, twenty-four cod and a few small pollock and cod. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but jigs and cod flies worked best for the pollock.

Dimitar Pavlov (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish, without question. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 28 pound, really good looking, cod. The cod is the Bunny Clark's largest this season, so far, by a half pound! Ian took a picture of Dimitar holding his big cod just before releasing it back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the right. Dimitar also landed the second largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Conor Donoghue (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Bailey (NY) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 10 pound cod, his three largest fish. Ray LaClaire (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Seth Greenwood (NY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. Todd Mallory (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock. Todd's largest cod also weighed 11 pounds. Gary Bailey (WA) caught an 11 pound cod, his largest fish. Mike Norlund (MA) landed the hard luck award today. I was never given a reason why.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. Needless to say, the weather and the fishing regulations played a part in the trip's demise. No trip today. The wooden anchors are out.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots (much more offshore) and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze and precipitation. At 5:30 AM, it started to rain harder. The rain continued throughout the morning. At times it poured down but, at other times, it was just steady rain. By 11:00 AM, the rain was tapering off. By noon, we had drizzle but the rain was essentially done for the day. We had signs of clearing by 2:00 PM, with the occasional peek at the sun. By 4:00 PM, the sky was clear and sunny. The wind blew out of the southwest in the morning with wind speeds up to fifteen knots or better offshore. This wind backed off everywhere by 10:00 AM. For the rest of the day there was hardly any wind. By 4:00 PM in Perkins Cove, there was no wind, the sun was out, the air temperature was 76F and the ocean along the shore was glassy calm. Seventy-six degrees was the highest air temperature that I saw all day. It was also humid, a bit humid, which made it seem warmer. So, three afternoons in a row that were summer-like and very pleasant. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 65F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 63F).

After a bike ride in the pouring rain for and hour and a half, I spent the rest of the day at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. Business wise, it was very slow. But it allowed me to get some things done that I wouldn't have been able to do otherwise. Of course, normally, I'm on the boat on this day. So I finished many things I wouldn't have been able to start had I been on the boat. I worked straight through until 6:00 PM and then retired for the evening.

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

I canceled today's trip yesterday due to the weather forecast and the fact that everyone else knew the forecast as well and were not interested in sailing. The leads me out to remind everyone that it would be a great day to enjoy lobsters and steamers on the deck of Barnacle Billy's restaurant. If you sit on the corner of the deck near the flag pole you can look at a forlorn Bunny Clark waiting for tomorrow's marathon trip!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at fifteen knots (at least) and the visibility over the ocean was good in, what seems like, haze. When the sun rose, we had plenty of visibility. It was very good. The sky remained overcast all morning and most of the afternoon. We saw some sun but not often. The sky was mostly overcast. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots with higher gusts but diminished to about five knots by sunset. The high air temperature in Perkins Cove was 67F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 59F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 57F).

The only extra thing I did today, besides working at Barnacle Billy's restaurant, was riding my bike about seventy-two miles in the morning. I was back a work by noon. I worked until 5:00 PM. After that I spent the rest of the night getting ready to go fishing, eating dinner and doing some desk work.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it was spitting rain, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good. The wind had been blowing out of the northeast at twenty knots at 1:00 AM.

Before the Bunny Clark left the dock this morning, we had a misty, wet, light rain. This persisted until we headed to sea.

There was a fairly large sea/swell to greet in the outer cove after our ride down the channel out of Perkins Cove. We had no problem negotiating any part of it but you knew it had been blowing fairly hard off shore. The ride to the fishing grounds was much slower than normal. At the five mile mark the seas were larger than they were along the shore. And, due to our course, we were only able to cruise at ten knots. It wasn't comfortable but it wasn't bad. The visibility was very good the whole way.

On the fishing grounds, we had sea swells of six to eight feet under a chop of two to three feet. Both seas and chops were coming out of the northeast. The wind was out of the northeast all day. At the start, we had fifteen knots with higher gusts. This wind diminished slowly during the day. The chops diminished as well with only a one foot chop when I called the day. The swells remained the same height but got further apart as the day progressed. There was very little wind for the ride back home. The air temperature reached a high of 65F in the shade. It was the first trip where I had to wear more than just a t-shirt. The tide (current) was moderate but running north to south at an oblique angle to the boat on anchor. This created a few more tangles than normal. The sky was overcast all morning and part of the early afternoon. We had fleeting glimpses of the sun in the later afternoon. Patches of blue sky were very scarce today.The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 66F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 52F).

The fishing conditions were good. In order to qualify that statement I have to tell you that we couldn't drift for being attacked by blue sharks. Between drifting attacks and attacks in general, we lost fifteen jigs. It could have been worse had we drift fished all day. Also, the current was a little tough to deal with. And the seas were large enough to disturb the jigs; it was hard to keep the jigs off the bottom. Catching and landings were very good in the morning, okay in the afternoon. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two cusk and sixteen redfish. We caught nary a single dogfish today, none. Released fish included twelve cod of 5 pounds or better, four small cod, fifteen haddock from a pound to 3 pounds, two sub-legal pollock, nine sub-legal redfish and a barndoor skate. We lost, probably, ten big fish. This probably due to the seas. We anchored for almost every stop. Only jigs and cod flies were used.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook.When the fish were biting everyone was catching them equally. When they weren't biting, no one was catching. We did have spells when no one was catching. Corey Russell (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. He also caught a 14 pound pollock. John Baker (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. John also caught a 13.5 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 17 pound barndoor skate caught by Roger Aldridge (NY). Roger also caught two pollock of 12 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Rory Casey (VT) caught the largest cod at 15.25 pounds. He also caught the most redfish. His two largest pollock weighed 15 pounds and 12.5 pounds. Don Hawley (MA) caught a 13 pound cod, his largest fish. Jeff Thayer (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the day, losing three jigs and having his share of tangles. It should be noted that his malady never once slowed him down in the fishing department. Only a couple short breaks to hurl over the side is the only thing that I saw to indicate that he was sea sick!

Friday, September 21, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was overcast, the wind was very light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. The sky stayed overcast for, really, most of the day. If we did see the sun, it was only briefly. The wind blew out of the south at a sustained twenty knots out of the south. This stronger southerly wind kept up long into the night. The air temperature was cool during the day with a high value of 63F. However, the southerly wind must have brought some warm air with it because, at 9:00 PM, the air temperature had risen to 66F. It might have noticed a higher value had I been paying attention. The visibility was good all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten knots to start. Seas were chops of two feet. But this wind increased as the fishing day progressed. And it wasn't long until seas were three and four feet. By 1:00 PM, the southerly wind was blowing twenty knots with seas in chops of four to six feet. The highest air temperature value observed in the shade was 64F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was mostly overcast with some sun here and there. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high value of 61F. And this is where it should be at this time of year.

The fishing conditions weren't the best so I would give it a value of good. The weather, mostly. The catching was excellent as was the fishing. Everyone walked off the boat with more fillets than they needed. Even the angler who was sea sick, and incapacitated from it, walked off with twenty-five pounds of fillets. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included one cusk. Released fish included twelve cod of 5 pounds or better, eight dogfish, three blue sharks, twenty-four haddock of various sizes and a couple small pollock and cod. They anchored and drift fished. Cod flies worked best. No bait was used today.

I don't know who was high hook today. But Norm Herrick caught over forty fish, mostly pollock. But that also includes the haddock and cod that he caught. And Norm gives fish away so I couldn't tell from the fillet bags. His largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. John Cox (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 15.5 pound pollock caught by George Hartman (VT). George also caught a 10 pound pollock. Keith Weber (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. Ian also weighed a 10 pound pollock and a pollock of 10.5 pounds for Keith.

Other Angler Highlights: Lexie Williams (MT) caught the best double of the day. The double included a 12 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Grace Schultz (ME) landed the hard luck award t-shirt. She was the high hurler of the trip.

I received a generous $150.00 donation sponsoring me in my cancer fund raiser called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The event is over but I am still very active in trying to generate donations. This donation came from Marc & Claire St. Onge (ME). They have supported me since I started working this event in 2007. Thank you both so very much for this support and help. I very much appreciate it.

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 70F, the sky was mostly overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least. Ashore, the sky was mostly sunny all day. There were some clouds. But, today, they didn't get in the way of the bully sun. The wind started off out of the southwest at almost twenty knots, at 2:30 AM, hauled out of the west at 5:00 AM, died out around 7:30 AM and then hauled out of the northwest. At first, the northwest wind blew a sustained twenty-five knots with gusts to thirty knots. An hour later, the northwest wind was blowing at fifteen to twenty knots. By noon, the wind had dropped and had hauled out of the north. I don't believe the wind blew any harder out of the north than ten knots. The air temperature dropped to a value of 68F by noon and remained at that value for most of the afternoon. The air temperature started to drop before sunset. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 47F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at fifteen to twenty knots with higher gusts to start. This wind diminished to about ten knots or less and then hauled out of the north at fifteen to twenty knots. This wind too diminished for the ride home. Seas were chops of three to five feet to start and two to four feet before they wrapped it up for the day. Seas were less than that on the way in. The sky was sunny all day. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing conditions were good at best between the seas, the wind and the dogfish. Catching was good. Landings were fair to good today, not like yesterday's trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock. In fact, no other legal fish were kept. Released fish included forty-six dogfish, six cod over 5 pounds, fourteen haddock and a few small pollock and small cod. They anchored for every spot. All terminal gear worked well. But jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Wade Smith (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. He was fishing away from everyone up in the bow. Page Bouchard (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Page also caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. Peter Brodeur (QC) caught the second largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Bill Bryant (FL) landed the hard luck award for being constantly tangled throughout the trip today, the worst slack line tangles of the season. Well, someone has to be the worst!

Sunday, September 23, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind was light all day. The wind started to blow out of the northeast, as mentioned. Wind speeds were barely over five knots. Before noon, the wind had already hauled out of the southeast. Again, wind speeds were about five knots or a little more. Late afternoon saw southwest winds of about eight knots. The sky stayed sunny and clear all day. At one point the sky was cloudless. The air temperature got up as high as 65F. But, at noon, it was still only 58F. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 41F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots in the morning, dying out late, and hauled out of the southeast at five knots in the afternoon. They had light southwest wind on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 67F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was excellent, over twenty miles. The sky was sunny and clear in the morning and overcast in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good today. Most fish caught today, legal or sub-legal were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included six cusk. Released fish included twenty-three haddock, eleven cod of 5 pounds or better, thirty-two dogfish, two blue sharks and a handful of small cod and pollock. Drifting was the method. Jigs and flies caught the most fish. Bait was not used. In fact, bait has only been best for haddock, which we can't keep until November 1st.

Richard Morrell (ME) or Lewis Hazelwood (MA) were high hook with the most legal fish. This would make Lewis the fisherman of the day because he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 23 pound pollock. And he tied for the second largest fish with a 22 pound cod. Captain Ian took a picture of Lew holding up his 23 pound pollock. That digital image appears on the upper left. Lew also caught a double that included a 17.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock. This double is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest double of the 2018 fishing season so far. Some of Lew's other good fish included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Richard caught a double that included an 18 pound cod and a 17 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest double of the 2018 fishing season to date. Ian took a picture of Richard holding his big double. This digital image appears on the right. Some of Richard's other good fish included an 18.5 pound pollock, a 14 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Scott Hubbard (NY) tied with Lew for the second largest fish of the trip. Scott's fish was a 22 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Tim Rozan (ME) landed a 12 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock, collectively his biggest fish of the trip. Anthony Palumbo caught a 14 pound pollock, his best, although he did not fish much. Valerie Hamel (ME) caught a 10 pound pollock, her biggest fish. Maurice Harp (ME) also caught a 10 pound pollock. Lillian Hubbard (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock, her biggest fish. She also landed the hard luck award because she went fishing on her birthday for her husband. That award, of course, is the captain's choice.

I was surprised today when I received a very generous donation sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge from John Bockstoce (MA), the famous arctic historian. Mr. Bockstoce has written several books on the arctic with the most superior photography I have ever seen. His donation was $250.00. But I thought it very nice that he would support me in this project. Thanks so much, John. I very much appreciate your support!

Monday, September 24, 2018

We were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. But a lack of anglers prevented us from leaving the dock. Between the haddock/cod regulations and the weather, we can't get a break this fall. Calmer days are coming but I fear not so much in the very political fishery management arena.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast directly above but seemed clear over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the northeast with sustained winds of twenty-two to twenty-three knots (with higher gusts) and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The northeast wind blew up to almost thirty knots until around 10:00 AM, when it started to back off. By noon, the northeast wind was blowing at fifteen knots, sustained. By 3:00 PM, the northeast wind wasn't even blowing as hard as ten knots. There was no wind in the later afternoon. The sky was clear all day with a bright sun. The viability was excellent over the ocean. The air temperature reached a high, that I saw, of 58F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 42F).

The day wasn't without excitement. In the morning, I found a leaking drain pipe under the lobster cooking tank that was shooting water on to the gas burners used to heat the water. This wasn't good. But we were able to get a temporary fix with the help of local plumber, Bion "Benny" Noble. This took most of the morning and eliminated the time I needed to complete this fishing update complete with pictures from yesterday's successful extreme day trip.

The rest of the day was spent working at the restaurant and planning meetings with individuals for tomorrow.

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

The marathon trip scheduled for today was canceled two days ago for lack of human participants and a gale warning for strong winds up to thirty-five knots out of the southeast.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was almost overcast with one bright star (Venus?) observable through the clouds over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky stayed mostly overcast with peeks at the sun through the clouds at 9:00 AM and 10:00 AM. We never saw the sun again. It started spitting rain at 11:30 AM. The rain increased in frequency after that and continued on through the day and into the night. At times it would stop, briefly. Other times it rained hard. But never seemed to really stop for long. The wind blew out of the southeast all day but never got to twenty knots during the daylight hours. According to the various weather buoys offshore, sea heights were up to five feet every six seconds during the day. After 7:00 PM, the wind started to increase dramatically. By 9:00 PM, we were seeing gusts to thirty-five knots. At the same time, the Portland weather buoy was showing seas of 8.5 feet every seven seconds. The wind blew hard right straight through midnight. The air temperature got up into the mid 60s during the afternoon. The visibility was fair in precipitation and haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 41F).

My routine remained the same; working in the morning, taking a break, coming back at noon and working until 7:30 PM. Today's focus was working on the new Barnacle Billy's web site. This along with mostly office duties and catching up on items that I was holding off to do until a day such as this. Not a very exciting day but very productive.

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Today's trip was canceled yesterday for a lack of anglers and lack of a good weather report. The weather has been pretty brutal as of late. We will be sailing tomorrow, on the marathon trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was a balmy 67F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the south at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair at best in fog/haze. The salient weather feature of the day was the air temperature. The high air temperature that I saw was 82F in Perkins Cove. It felt like summer. Even better than summer. In Perkins Cove, we are sheltered from the southerly wind. So we didn't see much wind, par se. But just a couple of miles offshore it was blowing a steady twenty knots. You could see the big seas from the Cove parking lot. But they were off far enough as to not bother our shoreline. I'm sure it was felt on Ogunquit beach! It wasn't that strong all day. In the morning, the southerly wind was little more than ten knots. It was after noon that the wind piped up. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds but it was seventy percent sunny. The visibility was fair to good in haze for most of the day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 63F).

I spent the morning working on the Bunny Clark, changing filters and getting other Bunny Clark stuff done. At noon, I was back at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. Wednesday is a big order day. So I was in the office mostly. I was done by 6:00 PM so I could get ready for tomorrow's marathon trip.

Suzanne Graves (ME) donated $25.00 to help me with my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. She has donated money every year to the cause. Her father sold me my first (larger than fifteen foot) lobster boat in 1975. We had been tuna fishing with that boat since 1972. Suzanne and I caught a lot of fish on that boat together. She and I caught one alone that weighed 900 pounds when she had bandages on both hands. Basically, I fought that fish alone on handline with her helping to set up gaffs and harpoons for me in the process. Those were the days! Thank you, Suzanne. I appreciate your support. Always.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind in Perkins Cove and the visibility over the ocean was good. It had been raining before 2:00 AM and a little after that time. It had all but stopped after that time.

The cloud cover was thin in places so that when cut our ties with the wooden anchors, the moon overhead made it look like dawn was fast approaching. I really never needed to look but through the windows as we headed around the corner, through the gate and out to sea. The wind had been blowing out of the southwest but was dying out. Before this, the wind had been strong from the south. So we had long rolling swells of six feet or so the whole ride to the fishing grounds. The sky stayed overcast for the ride but it never rained. The visibility was very good. The ocean was calm and there was enough distance between the seas to make it an easy ride to the fishing grounds. A northerly wind started to take control when we still had three more miles to the first spot. When we finally got anchored up, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at ten knots. With the wind came much cooler temperatures. I went from wearing a t-shirt for ninety-five percent of the ride to a heavy hooded sweatshirt for the last couple of miles and for the rest of the day. The highest air temperature for the day was at 3:00 AM this morning!

These are the high and low temperatures from the three places I like to list around New England. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 56F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew up to fifteen knots from the north northeast with higher gusts. The seas from the south had dropped a couple of feet by 10:00 AM. But we had a wind chop from the north northeast of two to three feet. The wind started to drop during the later part of the morning and continued for the rest of the day. With the wind drop, the seas dropped as well. From the beginning of the ride back to Perkins Cove, the ocean was fairly calm. We had an ever calmer ride home. The air temperature reached a high of 61F. The sky was mostly cloudy. And we sat under a canopy of clouds for three hours where you could see clear sky to the north that just wouldn't come our way. After noon, the sky was sunny for the rest of the day. The tide (current) was light for most of the day, moderate in the morning. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was good to very good. I would have given the fishing a higher rating as we had very few dogfish. But we must have had some undercurrent. That and having thirteen anglers with different line widths created some of the worst tangles I have seen all year. I would honestly say that the tangles alone yielded a loss of almost an hour and a half of fishing time. One tangle in particular, where a blue shark got hooked by a jig, created the worst tangle of the year involving everyone's line and making a mess so bad that all the lines had to be cut and leaders retied. The weather conditions weren't perfect either. The catching was very good as were the landings overall, catching and landings were nearly excellent for the last two hours of the fishing which gave us a very good to excellent trip for fillet quantity. We anchored for the first couple of spots and then found the drift fishing far more productive. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included nine redfish, three cusk, seventeen white hake and two squirrel hake. Released fish included nine cod under 4 pounds, one cod of 6 pounds, one pollock, thirteen haddock, eleven redfish, twelve or thirteen dogfish, one blue shark and one barndoor skate. We didn't see a single cod until after noon. Cod flies caught the most fish, by far. But single hook Lavjigs caught the best fish of the trip.

Joe Columbus (MA) was the fisherman of the day in every way except for winning the boat pool. He was high hook with the most legal fish. He had the most special fish, the most pollock over 10 pounds (I didn't weigh all of them either), had four trophy "counters" and spent more time with a fish on the line than any other angler. It also helped that he, Chris Tankred (OH) and Dennis Geissig (NY) were the least tangled of all the anglers today. Joe's largest fish was a 31.5 pound Maine state trophy white hake, the fourth largest fish of the trip. I took a picture of this longest of hakes, today. This digital image appears in this entry, top left. He also caught the fifth largest fish, another trophy hake of 30 pounds, and two other good sized hake, one of 20 pounds and the other of 16 pounds. He also caught an 11.5 pound pollock, three pollock of 10 pounds each, a 12 pound pollock, two pollock of 11 pounds each and a 13 pound pollock. He had a couple of pollock that were probably 10 pounds or a little better that I didn't weigh. It was a great day to be Joe Columbus!

Dennis Reissig (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 34 pound Maine state trophy white hake. Some of his other good fish included a 15 pound white hake, a 10 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, the second largest pollock of the trip. Sentor Tony Mazziotti (D-NY) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 33 pound Maine state trophy white hake. He also caught, our largest cusk of the year (until it was eclipsed by a larger cusk a half hour later!), a 25 pound Maine state trophy! His largest pollock weighed 13.5 pounds. The third largest fish was a 32 pound Maine state trophy cusk caught by John Spignardo (NY). This is the largest cusk we have seen since Kenton Geer (NH/HI) landed his Maine state record cusk of 36 pounds in 2002. John's cusk is in a tie for the second largest cusk that has ever been caught on the Bunny Clark. John Madden, Jr. (NY) also caught a 32 pound Maine state trophy on the Bunny Clark in 2002. John Spignardo's cusk, at 42 inches caliper fork length was an inch shy of the cusk that Kenton caught and of a 29 pounder caught by Dan Kelley (ME) in 2008, the two longest cusk I have ever seen. Incidently, we broke the IGFA all tackle cusk world record on the Bunny Clark with a cusk that weighed 30 pounds 1ounce on July 2, 1988. Neil Morrill (VT) caught that fish as we were drifting off a peak of 50 fathoms into 80 fathoms of water at the end of a day trip. Neil's world record lasted into the early '90s when it was beaten by a fish caught off the coast of Norway. Kenton's cusk would be a world record today had it not been disqualified because he had a cod fly located above his jig! John Spignardo also caught a 20 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 11 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Roman Rubinouski (UA) and Mykola "Nick" Sych (UA), two J1 students who worked for Barnacle Billy's this summer and last summer, wanted to go fishing today. Which they did, for about an hour and a half, or more. And they caught some nice fish. Roman caught a 20 pound white hake, his biggest fish of three fish that he caught. Nick caught a 17 pound white hake, his best. After Roman's 20 pounder was caught, they retired in the Hotel Bunny Clark. The motion of the ocean was too much for them today. They have sailed with us before on calmer days, leaving the dock in the light of the day. They were fine on those trips.

Chris Tankred (OH) was one of the higher hooks of the day. His largest fish was a 27 pound barndoor skate, the tenth barndoor skate of the Bunny Clark fishing season and a tie with two other anglers for our third largest. I took one picture of Chris with his barndoor skate just before releasing the fish alive. This digital image appears on the right. Chris is much bigger and taller than I am so he makes this fish look smaller than it actually is. Some of his other great fish included two white hake of 23 pounds each, a 22 pound white hake, a 13 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock and the largest pollock of the trip at 18 pounds. Mike Schetter (NY) boated a 28 pound Maine state trophy white hake, his largest fish. He also caught a 24.5 pound white hake. George Delahay (NY) caught a 21.5 pound white hake. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Mike Hall (NY) caught a 16 pound pollock. Joe Sinkler (NY) caught a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish of the trip. He also landed the hard luck award for being involved in most of the tangles today!

I received three donations sponsoring me in this years Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event designed to raise money for cancer reseach with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those individuals and their donations included: Steve Gunsett (NY) for $25.00 (he fished today but never caught anything of 10 pounds or better that I saw), Dennis Reissig for a generous $50.00 and Joe Columbus for another generous $50.00. Joe has given me so many donations this season, I can't keep track! Thank you all so very much for your generosity and support. I very much appreciate this great help!

Friday, September 28, 2018

Happy Birthday to my Sister, Meg, Paul "Hez" Haseltine, Dick Lyle and Rosie Geer!!!!!!!

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was raining very lightly, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at six knots and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least. By 6:00 AM, the northeast wind was blowing a sustained twelve knots with gusts to fifteen knots. That's the most we got out of the wind today. By mid morning, the wind had backed off again. And, by noon, we had six knots of northeast wind again. There was very little wind for the rest of the daylight hours. By sunset, the wind had hauled out of the southwest just enough to move a flag, barely. The air temperature was cool but managed to make it to 65F in Perkins Cove. The visibility was excellent. The sky was overcast almost all day until 4:00 PM, when the sky cleared and the sun could be seen above the trees in the western horizon. At 5:00 PM it was warm and sunny on the deck of Barnacle Billy's, overlooking Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten knots or more. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 58F. The sky was overcast for the trip. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was limited to fifteen and twenty miles in haze in the morning. After noon, the haze disappeared giving them a visibility over twenty-five miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

The fishing conditions were very good. The catching and landings were excellent, one of our best days of the year. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included three redfish and two white hake. Released fish included thirty-four cod of 5 pounds or greater, thirty-two haddock, nineteen dogfish, very few small cod and a small pollock or two. Drifting was the method. Jigs and flies caught the most fish. Bait has been, pretty much, ineffective since we were prohibited from keeping haddock.

Joe Columbus (MA) was clearly the fisherman of the day today. He was high hook with the most legal fish, as he was yesterday. Today, however, he tied for the largest fish of the trip with a 16 pound cod and tied for the boat pool with Chris LeBlanc (MA). Chris also caught a 16 pound cod. Some of Joe's other fish included a 5 pound haddock, a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Chris also caught a 12 pound pollock and a 14 pound pollock. Chris' 14 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: John Russell (ME) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Calvin Cook (MD) caught a 12 pound cod. Dennis Reissig (NY), mister hake, caught an 11 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 9 pound white hake. Devin Randall (NY) landed an 11 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Bruce Randall (NY) boated a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ian Wood (PA) caught (and released) a 5 pound haddock. This wasn't his biggest fish but it was his best! He also landed the hard luck award for losing a jig. Everyone, apparently, was healthy today. That's a good thing!

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was clear with a partial moon high overhead, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind was fairly light all day. Westerly in the morning, the wind hauled out of the northwest by noon. The northwest wind might have blown as hard as ten knots ashore. Most of the time the wind was barely lifting a flag. The air temperature rose as high as 71F. The visibility was excellent all day. The sky was clear with few clouds. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five knots or less. The ocean's surface was smooth over a rolling sea swell of two to three feet. The air temperature reached a high of 66F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and very sunny. The visibility ranged to well over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing conditions were very good. The weather was humanly perfect but there were quite a few dogfish that knocked the conditions down a category. The catching and landings were fair. Legal landings included twenty-three pollock, one redfish, seven cusk, a white hake and a mackerel. Released fish included seventy-five dogfish, four cod of 5 pounds or better and fifty-four haddock. They anchored and drift fished, trying to find the right fishing medium. Jigs and flies caught the most fish, all the fish.

Kyle Santor (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. He never did catch a fish as large as 10 pounds but he made up for it in quantity. Denis Talic (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.25 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by Gary Elliott (NV). Rick Blake, Sr. (NH) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Charlie Goodspeed (VT) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Sunday, September 30, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was crystal clear with a partial moon high overhead, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the north at ten to twelve knots to start the morning daylight hours. That wind died out around mid morning. Later in the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the southwest but it was light. The ocean along the shore was calm with larger than normal ocean seas crashing up on the rocks. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 64F. It probably was a bit warmer than that. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 39F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at ten knots, dropping to five knots and then nothing. The ocean, for most of the day, was calm over a long two to three foot rolling sea swell. The high air temperature for the day was 62F. The visibility was excellent, over twenty miles. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing conditions (fishing) was very good, the catching was very good to excellent as were the landings. It was a great day, a special day. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included three redfish and seven cusk. Released fish included fifty-three cod over 5 pounds, twenty-eight haddock, forty dogfish and a handful of small cod and pollock. They anchored and drift fished. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Fred Kunz (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. In fact, he was catching too many fish with the fly/jig combination. So he took off the fly for the rest of the day. I don't know at what part of the trip that he took the fly off the line. Fred's second largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Lucas Fraher (CT). There was a tie for the third largest fish. Both fish were 15 pounds and both fish were pollock. Mark Fraher (CT) caught one while David Simonetti (VT) caught the other. David also caught a 12.25 pound cod. Mark also caught an 11 pound pollock and released a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Gene LaFrance (MA) caught a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bob Gervasio (NY) landed an 11.5 pound pollock. Steven Balevre (NH) caught a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Mike Smith (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

Monday, October 1, 2018

We did not have enough interest to take the Bunny Clark out fishing today. So the old girl stays in Perkins Cove with the wooden anchors out.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. We got a sprinkle of rain at 8:00 AM. An hour later, we started to get rain. It rained, periodically, throughout the day, stopping occasionally, raining in earnest at other times. The wind blew lightly out of the northeast for most of the morning and through the early afternoon. By 4:00 PM, the we had northeast wind over ten knots. By 6:00 PM, northeast wind speeds were between ten and twelve knots. The visibility was fair to good in varying periods of precipitation. The highest air temperature that I saw was 55F. By 6:00 PM, the air temperature was 53F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 54F (with a low of 50F).

My morning was spent at the restaurant until 8:00 AM. Afterward, went home to work on the index page of this web site. I also had to make a call to figure out why a vessel trip report didn't upload from my tablet on Thursday. Turns out the application needed to be updated. After that I had some adjustments to make, finally posting the report and hour later. I also had to install a newer version of the operating system. Along with office work, I was done in time to take a quick shower and get back to the restaurant by noon. And most of the day was spent in the office there as well. My day is not long enough. I left the restaurant at 5:00 PM, to get the Bunny Clark ready to sail tomorrow. Not an exciting day but a day where I got much done.

Tim Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Lighthouse Fishing Club marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about (well, maybe a lilt from the north) and the visibility over the ocean was very good to excellent.

When we were down in Perkins Cove getting ready to sail, it was raining lightly. The roads weren't wet when I first got down there earlier in the morning. But it looked like rain was going to be our fate for the day. Oddly, it didn't rain for most of the ride to the fishing grounds. The visibility was good to very good. The wind was out of the northeast at five knots or less for half the ride out, ten knots or more for the second half. Seas were two feet in chops with a swell underneath. Our course was right into it. So our cruising speed stayed at ten or eleven knots. Comfortable. The air temperature was mild.

On the fishing grounds, we had sea swells of six feet, more or less, under a two to three foot chop. The wind blew out of the northeast all day at ten to fifteen knots with the very occasional higher gust. The wind and sea state remained the same for the whole time on the grounds and the whole ride home. We had rain almost all morning. There wasn't much rain in the afternoon but it was misty and wet anyway. We didn't have fog but it was so hazy as to make one think that the fog was going to shut in at any minute. Likewise, the visibility was ten miles or more in the morning and only about three miles in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 58F. The tide (current) was strong all day. The sky was overcast all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was ?F (with a low of ?F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 53F (with a low of 49F).

The fishing conditions were not good. The sea state was a challenge for most, we had a few dogfish everywhere we went and the stronger than normal current made it a challenge to hold bottom and keep from tangling. The catching was good to very good. Landings were fair until the last stop of the day, making landings good overall. I saw many more fish on the sounding machine, today, than we saw in landings. The fish, particularly legal fish, didn't want to bite for most of the day. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. And we released many sub-legal pollock. Legal landings also included one redfish, thirteen cusk, forty-five mackerel and two whiting. Released fish included ten cod of 5 pounds or more, fourteen haddock, twenty-five small cod, fifty-two dogfish and too many small pollock to count. We also had two bluefin tuna hook-ups at the same exact time, on two jigs casted out at the same time. One angler was Bill Lewis (MA). The other was Rick Gurney (MA). Both had reels that were nearly stripped clean before they broke the fish off. Both were fish too big for a jig stick - even if we could have chased them down. We tried every boating discipline available including anchoring, drifting and using the sea anchor. No method stood out as the best. It depended on the spot. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

I don't know who was high hook. If I were to guess, I would volunteer Jody Goff (MA) or Gloria Gennari (MA). But this is just a well informed guess based on the number of times, it seemed, that I had to take fish from them. I would be leaning toward Gloria as the number one. This was a call made harder by the fact that everyone pooled their fillets today.

Ben Barzousky (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is the second largest pollock of the 2018 Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I took a picture of Ben holding is prize. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. Ben is a big guy, making the fish look smaller than it should. My opinion. Tom Nazzewski (MA) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 24.5 pound pollock, just shy of a Maine state trophy by half a pound. This fish ties the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of the season to date. Tom had the most tangles of the trip but found a moment of respite to hook his fish. At first, he thought it was just another tangle under the boat until I encouraged him to "reel!". Gloria Gennari won the Club pool for the third largest fish of the trip with the third largest fish, a 24 pound pollock. She is tied for eighth place in the Bunny Clark's biggest pollock list at this date. I took a picture of Gloria holding her big pollock. This digital image appears on the right. She also landed two other pollock of 10 pounds each that I weighed.

Other Angler Highlights: Barry Juhasz (CT) landed the second fish of the trip, a 9 pound pollock. I know he caught a bigger one. But I didn't weigh it. Jody Goff led the Club pool's top two spots for most of the day with two pollock of 14 pounds each. That changed dramatically around 1:00 PM and on a couple spots after that. Jody also caught a 10.5 pound pollock that I weighed. Rick Gurney caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. He also caught a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Steve Rapkowicz (MA) caught the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds. He also caught the fourth largest fish, a 23.5 pound pollock. And he caught the largest double of the day. His double included an 18 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. This double ties with Lewis Hazelwood (MA) for the fifth largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Al Hanson (MA) caught a 13.5 pound pollock but lost another over 10 pounds because I didn't bring a gaff with me when going to his aid. George Sweet (MA) caught a 19 pound pollock, his largest fish. George also caught a pollock that weighed 14.75 pounds. Chris Wood (MA) caught a 15 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. He lost a couple of beauties for no reason that I could think of. He seemed to be doing everything right. Dick Carpenter (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. He also caught the most dogfish. Amazing how well a piece of mackerel on the treble hook works - for dogfish! Todd Krutiak (MA) landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status, catching no fish and taking a room in the Hotel Bunny Clark for the day! Ouch! That has to hurt!

I received some very thoughtful donation gifts supporting my drive for a cancer free world through the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event that raised over $50 million for cancer research & care (in the 2017 event) for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. The fund raising will not end until the end of the year this year. We hope to raise $52 million by January 2019. Those individuals and their donations included: Jody Goff for $25.00, Gloria Gennari for a generous $50.00 and Al Hanson (MA) for a generous $67.00 (my age in dollars!). Thank you all so very much for your sponsorship. It means a great deal to have wonderful people like yourselves who I respect and who I can call a friend who feels as I do about the cancer problem. It keeps me working on this project with the knowledge that I am helping and good people believe that I can - with their help!

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was overcast, it was raining quite hard, the wind was blowing out of the north at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in haze, light fog and precipitation. By 6:30 AM, the rain had stopped. Ashore, after that, we had no rain for the rest of the day. The sky remained overcast all morning and for the first two hours of the afternoon. Then the sky became sunny with clouds. Before sunset, the sky was overcast again with no rain threat. The visibility was very good all day today. The highest air temperature that I saw was 63F. The wind blew out of the north at ten knots or so. By mid-morning, the wind was gone. The wind was light and variable in direction for the rest of the day. The ocean along the shore was calm with eight foot breaking seas along the beach. The surf was loud. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at ten knots or more in the morning with two to three foot chops over a rolling sea swell of three feet. During the afternoon, the wind petered out to not much. The ocean was calm over the existing sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast in the morning, sunny in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

The fishing conditions were very good, much better than yesterday's trip. The catching was nearly excellent. Landings were very good. The only legal fish species landed today was the pollock. And there were plenty of them. Released fish included seven dogfish, fourteen cod over 5 pounds, eighteen haddock, a couple sub-legal redfish, a handful of small cod and some small pollock, not many. They anchored and drift fished. Jigs and flies caught the most fish, by far.

Lucas Aalijar (VT) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Clayton Symon (QC). He also caught a 12.5 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Smokey Dorsey (NC). This was the first time in his life that Smokey has been sea sick. It didn't stop him from fishing. But he told me after the trip that it upset him. Earlier this year he fell eight feet off a ladder. His doctor told him that he would have equilibrium problems for a while. Well that while is still with him, I guess. We will see how he does tomorrow. I hope it's a little better - for his sake!

Other Angler Highlights: Dawna O'Haver (WI) landed an 11 pound pollock, her largest. Jim Watson (NY) did one better with an 11.5 pound pollock. Wally O'Haver (WI) boated a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Annabelle Harper (QC) caught a 10.5 pound pollock. But she also caught the dreaded mal de mer and landed the hard luck award for her anatomical girations. It sucks to be sick!

I received a donation of $25.00 from a former Marine/Police Captain (and excellent fisherman), Gene LaFrance (MA), supporting my efforts in the cancer fight with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Gene has fished on party boats all over the world. I am honored that he drives over three hours to fish with me at 85 years old! Thanks, Gene. Very much appreciated! And thanks for such a nice letter. You humble me.

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was overcast, the flags were limp and the visibility over the ocean was good, at least.

We had clear sailing out of the gate. There was a misty rain at the dock before we were to head out. But that was gone once we left Perkins Cove behind. We never saw another drop of rain for the rest of the day. For the first half of the ride to the fishing grounds, we had a light southerly chop. The second half showed us a southwest chop. It was full cruise this morning. No holding back. We had plenty of visibility and plenty of sea room. The sky was overcast for the whole ride. The air temperature was mild.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the south by southwest, a one foot chop over long rolling sea swells of four to six feet. The wind velocity increased as the day progressed and hauled more southwest by south at the end of the fishing. At that time we had a solid three or four foot chop ahead of a fifteen to twenty knot breeze. The air temperature 60F for most of the day. No higher. The tide (current) was light to moderate and, mostly, into the wind. The sky was overcast, mostly, with some blue sky and sun. In fact, it looked like it was going to clear in the early morning but that never happened. The visibility ranged to about twenty miles, at most. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing conditions were very good. Even when it got windy in the afternoon, the tide into the wind made the drifting perfect. The catching was good. Landings were less so. We caught some nice sized fish today. But, for what I saw, the bite was off. This meant much roaming around and many stops. We caught only a third of the fish that were caught on yesterday's trip with two less anglers. But the overall poundage landed was just shy of yesterday's poundage. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included three mackerel, four redfish, four cusk and two white hake. Released fish included eighteen cod from 5 pounds to 18 pounds, eleven small cod, twenty-two haddock, seven dogfish and fifty-five sub-legal pollock. One of our anglers (Jim Taylor) fought what could have been a small tuna. We never got to see the fish before it bit off the fly. There was no chaffing on the monofilament that would have told me it was a shark. But it was a lazier than normal tuna, if indeed it was a tuna. Regardless, we never saw the fish despite the fact that Jim got the fish up as far as the mono leader. We spent most of the day drifting. We did try the anchor three times with variable success. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Madison Williams (DE) was the fisherman of the day. I suspect he was high hook with the most legal fish. But he did catch the largest fish of the trip, a 22 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock that Madison has ever caught. He was, however, not in the boat pool for the largest fish. I did take a picture of Madison with his big pollock. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. Some of his other good fish included an 18.5 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock, a 17 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound cod and a double that included an 8 pound pollock and a 14.25 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. In addition, he broke off a really big groundfish, probably a pollock, maybe a double. He was using 80 pound test leader material! Jim Taylor (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 21.5 pound pollock. I took a picture of Jim with his big pollock as well. This digital image appears on the right. Jim also tied for the third largest fish. Both fish were 21 pounds. Both were pollock. Mike Dow, Jr. (CT) caught the other one. They both would have tied for the boat pool as well. But Mike didn't enter the boat pool. So Jim won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the third largest fish. Jim also caught a 15 pound pollock. It was a good day to be Jim!. Incidentally, Mike, Jr. caught another pollock that weighed 18.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Josh DeBerardinis (NC) caught a bunch (school?) of nice fish. Some these included two pollock of 18 pounds each, a 10.25 pound pollock, a 10 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a 19 pound pollock. Smokey Dorsey (NC) landed a 12 pound pollock and a 19 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. Dave Vanatta (PA) caught the biggest double of the day. His double included a 9 pound pollock and a 19 pound pollock. Mike Dow, Sr. (CT) caught a 12 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds. Dennis Pine (PA) caught the biggest cod. It weighed 18 pounds. He also caught an 18 pound pollock and two pollock of 11 pounds each. Jim Watson (NY) caught the only trophy fish of the trip, a 12.25 pound cusk. His largest pollock weighed 11 pounds. Cornell "Chef" Brown (NJ) caught the fifth largest fish of the trip, a 19.5 pound pollock. I'm sure this is the largest pollock that he has ever caught. He also caught a big cod double. One of these cod weighed 13 pounds. The other got off the hook when I was taking the bigger one off the hook. His smaller cod was still over 10 pounds, although I did not get to weigh it.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear with a sliver of a moon hanging high over the eastern horizon, the wind was out of the north northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northeast at twenty to twenty-five knots. From the start of the daylight hours, the wind looked like it had no teeth. And, indeed, it didn't. The wind was there at the start, for sure. But the seas were chops, smaller than what is associated with that velocity of wind from such a long reach. The wind had already dropped ten knots by 10:30 AM. By 1:00 PM, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots, max. The air temperature was cool all day. At one point I saw an air temperature of 58F. I don't know if this was the high air temperature for Perkins Cove but it had to be close. The visibility was excellent. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 63F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 65F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the Northeast, sustained, at fifteen to twenty knots. Seas were chops of three to six feet. By noon, the wind had hauled out of the east and was blowing about ten knots or less. Seas were long rolling chops of two to five feet. The air temperature reached a high of 59F. The visibility ranged over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was cloudless. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing conditions, weather wise, were not the greatest. But this only helped the bite, which was very good, maybe excellent. The bite stayed very good for the rest of the trip. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good, overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two cusk, one white hake and one monkfish. Released fish included twelve cod of 5 pounds or greater, eighteen haddock, five dogfish and a couple small cod. They anchored for most of the day, drift fished at the end. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Mike "Madison" Williams (DE) was clearly high hook today. I'm sure he caught a pollock around 10 pounds but Ian had his hands full weighing pollock of 10 pounds and continued weighing fish but only over 10 pounds. Garry Golden (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Lucas Cauller (NH). one was a 13 pound pollock. The other was a 12.5 pound monkfish. The monkfish is the third largest monkfish caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Ian took a picture of the monk. This digital image appears on the left.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Bemis (NY) caught the best double of the day. His double included an 11.5 pound pollock and a 7 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Steve also caught a 10.5 pound pollock. Phil Ashe (NY) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Cayenne Amey (NH) landed the hard luck award for being a little green around the gills!

Gary Golden sponsored me today in my in my involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money to fight cancer. Garry has fished with me for many years. He has always been a great angler. Thank you so much for your help and support. I appreciate it very much, almost as much as I appreciate having you on the Bunny Clark! All the best!

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo hosted the Onota Fishing Club extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was clear with a sliver of a moon was hanging over the eastern horizon, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good, maybe excellent. Today, ashore, the wind was light during the daylight hours. First from the northeast and then southeast. The ocean was calm along the shore. By sunset the wind became established out of the south. The southerly wind had piped up to fifteen knots by 7:30 PM. The air temperature got up as high as 61F by 2:00 PM. I didn't check it after that but the air temperature was mild in the late afternoon and well into the night. The sky was nearly cloudless all morning, a mix of sun and clouds in the afternoon. The visibility was very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 40F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 59F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots, died out and then hauled out of the southeast at five knots. The ocean's surface was calm over a long rolling sea swell of six feet, more or less. The air temperature reached a high of 62F in the shade. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good today. There were no dogfish to speak of, the weather conditions were nearly perfect and it was a pleasant day to be on the ocean. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included a redfish, three cusk, a white hake and another monkfish. Released fish included twenty-six cod over 5 pounds, twenty-five haddock, two dogfish and a handful of small cod. Drifting was the method. Jigs and flies were, really, the only terminal gear worth using.

Ray Westermann (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His two largest fish included an 11.5 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Justin Wehry (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock and a double that included a 12 pound cod and a 10 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Steven Scott (MA) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock. Steven also caught a 10 pound pollock, a 13 pound cod and a 12 pound cod. The third largest fish was a 14 pound pollock caught by John Hayes (MA). John also caught a 14 pound cod and a 12.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Carr (MA) landed the Bunny Clark's fourth largest monkfish of the fishing season today. It weighed 12 pounds. It's actually a tie for fourth as there was another 12 pound monkfish caught by Edson Setzer (NY) on July 16th. Jason Murphy (MA) landed a double that included a 12.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Fred Ostrander (MA) landed an 11.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jessica Murphy (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock, her biggest. Ed Blake (MA) caught a 13 pound cod, his largest fish. Rob Carnevale (MA) also caught a 13 pound cod as his biggest fish. And Andy Zurrin (MA), too, caught a 13 pound cod. Andy also caught the hard luck award for being involved in almost every tangle on the boat today!

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, the wind was out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. Ashore, we had very light winds out of the southwest with air temperatures feeling mild. The southwest wind dropped to calm at around 9:30 AM and then started to blow out of the northeast and, then, east. The wind was light out of the east until mid afternoon when it started to increase. But not a lot. We had fifteen knots of northeast wind blowing over the parking lot by 6:30 PM. The velocity remained until the restaurant closed at 10:00 PM. The air temperature got up to a high of 64F or maybe more. I'm sure the air temperature might have reached 70F had the wind not hauled out of the northeast. The morning was overcast with light rain until 11:00 AM. It never rained again the rest of the day. The sky stayed overcast, however. The visibility was very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest in the morning, five to ten knots was the velocity. Seas were two to three feet in chops, probably more from the wind overnight than the wind velocity there at the time. There was also a three to four foot swell underneath. Before noon, the wind dropped, as it did ashore, and then hauled out of the northeast. Wind speeds were five to ten knots for the rest of the fishing trip. Seas became chops of a foot over the existing swell. The air temperature reached a high of 61F. The sky was sunny in the morning which was a heck of a lot different than it was ashore. Although I do remember seeing blue sky to the east after sunrise. The afternoon saw overcast skies. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility was about fifteen miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing conditions were variable today. Some places had dogfish. Ian moved away from those areas. The seas/weather improved as the day progressed. The catching was slow in the morning, very good in the afternoon. Landings were good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included two redfish and six cusk. Released fish included thirty-six dogfish, eighteen cod over 5 pounds, sixteen haddock and a handful of small pollock and small cod. They anchored and drift fished. Jigs and flies caught the most fish.

Ian couldn't tell me whom was high hook. Ron Sadlon (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Richard Morrell (ME). His biggest cod was a notable 10.5 pounder. Joe Colford (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 11.5 pound cod. Dave Cannistraro (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole/high hurler of the trip. Sometimes being number one is not so great!

And an interesting thing happened to Richard Morrell today. He was fishing with a sinker and two flies above the sinker, one green. During the early morning pollock blitz, where all hell seemed to be breaking loose with a great bite, Richard broke his gear off. Ian re-rigged him with another setup very much like the previous one with a green above the sinker. After the bite tapered off with the drift, Ian moved the boat about a thousand yards from the original spot where Richard lost his gear and set up another drift on a different school of pollock. A little while into the drift Richard caught a pollock with a green fly, his earlier green fly, hooked into the corner of it's mouth. The interesting part was that he caught the pollock with the new green fly caught in the same side of the mouth as the other green fly, maybe a millimeter away! Without Ian knowing, when Ian set up the new drift, the current had changed and brought the boat right back to where Richard had lost the fly in the first place! It was not Ian's intention to drift back to the first spot but it certainly made a better story because of it!

Columbus Day Monday, October 8, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, the wind was out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The northeast wind had been stronger with a sustained twenty knots of velocity earlier in the morning. The wind was already decreasing when I got down to the Cove to figure out the parking situation. The wind continued to back off during the morning. By 2:00 PM, the wind had hauled out of the east and was only blowing at about six knots along the shore. The ocean was fairly calm except right along the shore where the offshore swells where making good surfing waves along the beaches. The air temperature was raw all day and didn't get much above the air temperature at 5:00 AM. I didn't look at the thermometer but it was cold and damp from the on shore breeze. We had a glimpse at the sun around 10:00 AM but that was only a quick out and in. The sky was, essentially, overcast all day. The visibility was very good over the ocean. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 54F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 53F (with a low of 47F).

They had a choppy ride to the fishing grounds. Ian held his cruising speed at ten knots to make it easier on the passengers. By the time they made it to the grounds, the wind was backing off but there were still wind gusts to fifteen knots and seas of two to four feet. The wind diminished duirng the trip. Later in the afternoon, there was a one foot chop over a long two to three foot rolling sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 55F in the shade. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast for the whole time. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing conditions were good, the catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included a cusk and a white hake. Released fish included thirty-two cod over 5 pounds, nineteen haddock, twenty-four dogfish and a few small cod. Drifting was the method. All anglers used the jig/fly combination. No bait was used at all.

Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish, by far. His largest fish was an 11 pound pollock. Effrum Morrill (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 18 pound pollock. Effrum also caught an 11 pound pollock. There was a tie for the second largest fish at 17 pounds. Both cod. Dustin Morrill (ME) caught one and Kevin Zimmerman (ME) caught the other. Dustin also caught an 11 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Lewis Hazelwood (MA) caught a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Israel Copp (PA) caught a 15 pound cod, his biggest fish today by far. Tim Rozan (ME) caught a 12 pound cod, his biggest fish. Tim also landed the hard luck award for a bit of hurling. I don't believe anyone else was sick today. Of course, Tim doesn't give up and did fish. He just wasn't as comfortable as he could have been doing it!

Not so Tim Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. We had nary a soul interested in going. So the Bunny Clark remains in Perkins Cove with the wooden anchors out.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots (more offshore) and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze. The wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots ashore in the early part of the morning and then hauled out of the west southwest during the later part of the morning. Winds speeds got up as high as twenty knots. Winds appeared to diminish later in the day but it never got calm. The air temperature soared to the high 70s. The highest air temperature that I saw was 78F but it could have been higher. The sky cleared and was mostly sunny all day. The visibility was good in some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 50F). It's hard for me to believe that it was 82F in Portland.

I spent the day in Barnacle Billy's restaurant. We are short of staff so it was certainly a help that I was there. But it didn't do anything for my fishing fix. Particularly when I could see the boat tied to the dock every time I looked around!

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots (more offshore) and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west most of the day. After a southwest showing before sunrise, the morning featured fifteen to twenty knots of westerly wind and sunny skies. The sky stayed sunny all day. The air temperature rose to abnormally high values, quickly. By 2:00 PM, I saw a reading of 85F. And high temperature records were broken in towns along the coast. The night was warm until, at 7:30 PM, the wind hauled out of the east and blew twenty to twenty-five knots. The wind had dropped to zero before the easterly wind change. This dropped temperatures about ten degrees almost immediately and brought us back to reality. The visibility was very good all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 55F). Today's high temperature of 84F breaks the previous record high for this date of 81F set in 2011 and 1949. Most of the other cities that have kept records for longer periods had warmer temperatures for this date ten years earlier.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of one to three feet with no ocean swell to write about. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was clear and sunny all day, cloudless at one point. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

It was a vanilla day on the Bunny Clark when you compare it to the rest of the fall. The fishing has been very consistent, very good and with plenty of pollock. Today was very good overall. Nothing out of the ordinary happened, really. The fishing conditions were good. It could have been better had there not been so many dogfish around, the tide not been so strong and the sea state been better. The catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, of course. Legal landings also included one redfish, two cusk and ten mackerel. The mackerel were very big. Released fish included nineteen cod over 5 pounds, forty-four haddock, eighty dogfish and a few small cod. They drift fished the whole day. Everyone used jigs and cod flies.

It was too difficult to keep track of high hook. John Manis (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was an 11 pound pollock caught by Vince DeBari (NJ). Franco Liquori (CT) landed the third largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Catlin Fox (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jim "Chip" Chiapponi (CT) had a big shark on the line for a while. Chip ended up breaking the fish off before they caught a glimpse of the fish. So they never did fish out if the shark was a porbeagle or just a blue shark. We start to see the porbeagle (mackerel) sharks at this time of year. Those sharks are very good eating. Michael Wang (ME) landed the hard luck award for becoming the sole hurler of the trip.

I received three donations sponsoring my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. This is a cycling event designed to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund in Boston, Massachusetts. Those donors and their donations included: Vince DeBari for a generous $60.00, Franco Russo (MA) for $25.00 and James Chiapponi for $30.00. Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. I very much appreciate the support!

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Today's trip was canceled partly because of the lack of POBs and, partly, because of the strong northeast wind expected for the morning. Another day that the Bunny Clark resides in Perkins Cove for the day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was spitting rain, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was good at best. The rain, pretty much, started at 5:00 AM. From there it rained all day. Sometimes it was a hard rain. But that was rare. Mostly it was a light rain or drizzle all day. The wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots or more for the first three or four hours after 5:00. Then it started backing off. There was very little wind in Perkins Cove from noon through sunset. The rain stopped around 10:00 PM. The sky was overcast all day. No chance for a sun sighting today. The visibility was fair to good, back and forth, throughout the day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 50F).

I spent the day working at Barnacle Billy's. I had repair parts to pick up for the lobster tank, year end tax/book keeping decisions I had to make and the general work with orders and greeting patrons. My daughter, Halley, had driven up from New Jersey. So I had a normal family dinner with my son and daughter and wife before heading back to work at 6:00 PM.

Friday, October 12, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light out of the north and the visibility over the ocean was good as far as I could tell. Ashore, the wind was light out of the north through half of the morning, stronger (ten knots?) through the last half. After noon, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew up to twenty knots for a bit before backing off. The northwest wind blew at ten to fifteen knots for a couple of hours before backing off. The sky was overcast for most of the day. We had no rain at all despite the pounding of rain and wind that lower Massachusetts and Rhode Island had, the remnants of Hurricane Michael sliding by. Michael was too far offshore today to bother us, thankfully. The sun showed up at 2:00 PM and stayed out for the rest of the day. It was a beautiful late afternoon. The visibility was very good. The air temperature got up as high as 61F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 39F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 41F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at five to ten knots in the earlier part of the morning, ten to fifteen knots in the later part of the morning and into the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 57F under the shade top. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was overcast for the whole trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing conditions were good. The tide and the weather conditions kept it down a category. The catching was very good. Landings were also very good. Except for one small cod and one dogfish, the only fish that was caught today was the pollock. And they caught plenty of them. They anchored for the trip. Only jigs and cod flies were used.

They ended up leaving the fishing grounds early as they had enough fish and they had had enough. We only had five anglers to begin with. Everyone fished in the beginning. But as the day progressed, all but Rich Callahan (CT) had equilibrium problems. Rich was fishing alone with Captain Ian and Anthony taking a trick at the rod & reel as well. Rich had as many fish as he wanted and the other anglers felt the same. So they headed home. The Bunny Clark kissed the float just before 4:00 PM.

"The Compassionate" Rich Callahan (he called the trip when he realized that he was the only one left fishing) was high hook with the most legal fish. Rich caught the second largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. Rich Hess (PA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 12.5 pound pollock caught by Steve Day (ON). Beth Anne Hess (PA) landed the hard luck award for being the first one to relinquish breakfast. She was also, probably, the hardest hit as well. Captain's opinion, of course.

I received a generous donation sponsoring me in this years Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donation was a monetary amount of $50.00. The donors were Roger & Linda LaVallee (VT). They were down visiting Ogunquit yesterday. I happened to see them at the restaurant where they gave me the check. Thank you so very much, Roger & Linda. So very thoughtful and generous. All the best to you both!

Saturday, October 13, 2018

We had not enough anglers to make the trip today. Most of the anglers we did have bailed with the rainy weather forecast. 'Tis a sad Bunny Clark at the float today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 46F, the sky was overcast, there was no discernable wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the rain started around 7:00 AM. It rained all morning and into the early afternoon. The sky remained overcast until, at 3:00 PM, the clouds parted, the sun came out and remained out for the rest of the afternoon and evening. The highest air temperature that I saw during the day was 46F. There was no wind until mid morning when it came out of the west. Westerly winds of fifteen knots or so was the rule throughout the rest of the day. The visibility cleared up after the rain to very good, as it was early morning. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 46F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 32F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 37F).

I started the morning working on a lobster cooking tank at the restaurant and figuring out a computer glitch with the engine of the Bunny Clark that happened after I changed the oil last evening. By mid morning, both problems were solved. The lobster tank will be an ongoing thing until we close next Sunday.

The rest of the day was spent at Barnacle Billy's restaurants. I took some time to eat with daughter's, fiances, parent's, Halley and Deb. And went back to work after that. It was a slow last hour in the restaurant. I got back home at 9:30 PM to watch the Red Sox have trouble against the Astros. Ouch.

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 40F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west northwest at ten to fifteen knots to start but backed off to light westerly in the later part of the morning. The wind stayed light out of the west or west northwest all day ashore. The highest air temperature that I saw was 51F but that was a 11:00 AM, not a good time to see a day's high temperature. I never looked again. The sky was clear all day, cloudless most of the morning, with a bright sun. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 58F (with a low of 28F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 33F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots in the morning to ten knots later in the morning and afternoon. Seas were chops of two to three feet when they first arrived to two and one foot chops in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 55F. The sky was sunny all day. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F, fairly warm for this time of year.

The fishing conditions were not bad. So I would rate the fishing as very good. The weather wasn't bad, there were no dogfish to speak of and the tide was fine. The catching was very good to excellent as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. In fact, there were no other legal species caught. Released fish included fourteen haddock, fifteen cod over 5 pounds, two dogfish and a couple small cod. Drifting was the method. Mostly only flies were used.

I didn't ask Ian who was high hook and he didn't volunteer that information. I should have asked. Phil Lamb (MI) landed an "ace" today. An ace in Bunny Clark lingo means the three largest fish of the trip. It can happen with anglers as many as six or seven times in a season. In two seasons, there wasn't a single angler who recorded an ace. This season, this is only the second ace that has been landed. Phil won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound cod. The other two fish were a 12.5 pound cod and an 11.5 pound pollock. It was a good day to be Phil Lamb!

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Clark (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock, his largest fish. Richard Clark (CA) caught a 9 pound pollock, his largest fish. However, he fought a porbeagle shark for an hour and fifteen minutes before losing it near the surface. It was a very big porbeagle. Had they landed it, it would have been the largest we have caught on the Bunny Clark. Richard's fishing set up was not conducive to landing big sharks, however. He was fishing with a sinker on the bottom and two cod flies above the sinker. He had hooked the shark with one of the flies. His leader was 80 pound test. Even then I wouldn't have expected the fight to last fifteen minutes with that set up. They had the fish to the leader twice but just could not get it close enough for the flying gaff. Nor could they have harpooned it effectively - had they had a harpoon. David Yaede (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting sea sick as soon as they arrived on the fishing grounds and never landing a legal fish because of his malady.

Monday, October 15, 2018

We have no anglers today to make the extreme day trip a go on the Bunny Clark. So she stays forlornly on the float again. She has been there too many time this season.

Also, I have canceled tomorrow's marathon trip. The National Weather Service has been upgrading the weather forecast all weekend to gale warning out of the west with gusts to forty-five knots and seas (offshore) to fifteen feet. It would be a very uncomfortable day on the ocean tomorrow. And not a time to have problems. Not that I expect any. Better days are coming.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was clear, there was zero wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 6:00 AM, the air temperature had dropped to 38F. At sunrise, we had sea smoke appearing on the surface of the ocean along the shore in a scene more appropriate for the middle of the winter. The surface water temperature is still 57F along the shore. With the higher than normal surface water temperature and the lower air temperatures, the sea smoke appeared like little white elves dancing on the surface. The air temperature struggled to get above 50F this morning. By noon, the air temperature was only 51F. But the air temperature increased as the afternoon progressed. By 2:30 PM, the air temperature reached 57F. But I saw the highest air temperature at 7:30 PM. At that time the air temperature had reached 63F. That was the highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove. We had no wind all morning. The southerly wind struck at 11:00 AM, the same time that we started to see the rain. The sky had been clear at sunrise. But high clouds soon appeared overhead followed by overcast skies at 9:00 AM. From that time on it looked like rain. Our first drop of rain turned into a steady rain by noon with the southerly wind picking up speed. By 1:00 PM, we had sustained winds of fifteen knots out of the south. The rain was intermittent so that you didn't go outside without expecting it. And I took an oil top everywhere I went - which was mostly just between restaurants in Perkins Cove. By sunset, southerly winds were blowing over twenty knots sustained with some gusts to thirty knots. By the time I went to bed at 9:00 PM, the wind was already out of the southwest, blowing twenty knots sustained and working around the compass toward the west. We had variable visibility from fair to good most of the day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F - at 10:30 PM - with a low of 45F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 61F (with a low of 30F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 63F - at 10:57 PM - (with a low of 33F).

I spent most of the morning at the restaurants, taking a break to jump on the bike for nineteen miles and experiencing fifteen minutes of rain before making it back home. The rest of the day was spent at the restaurant. I was expecting to have extra time to work on the Barnacle Billy's web site today but the restaurants tend to throw work at you when you least expect it. And today was one of those days. I worked from noon until 6:30 PM, spending most of my time in the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. In the meantime, Matt Pedersen, the number one guy at Barnacle Billy's (original) was resurrecting my home computer that died a couple of weeks ago. I use this computer for everything Bunny Clark, including updating the Bunny Clark web site. I have two backup laptop computers in case that home PC goes down. I had been updating the site with the laptops. So I was taking Matt's place at certain times and getting the normal and extra-normal items completed as well. It seemed like a long day despite the expected lack of business on a rainy Monday.

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

I canceled today's marathon trip Sunday night due to westerly gale warnings from the National Weather Service. The weather has been typical fall weather. Unfortunately, during the last few seasons, our weather at this time of year has not been fall-like. I, for one, was hoping we would have the weather we had last fall where I never wore much more than a t-shirt for every fishing trip until we stopped in November and the wind was lighter than normal. Oh, well. I would rather be ashore today than fighting forty knots of westerly wind. Better days are coming!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at thirty knots sustained and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. After 5:00 AM, the wind backed off a bit. Wind speeds out of the west were about twenty-five knots (more or less) for the next three hours, twenty knots until noon and fifteen to twenty knots after that. The wind was still blowing off shore by sunset and into the night. But, ashore, it was a quiet evening for wind. The sky was clear all day, cloudless in fact. The visibility was excellent. I saw a high of 56F in Perkins Cove at 2:00 PM. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 60F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 56F (with a low of 33F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 42F).

It was another day at Barnacle Billy's. I have never spent so much time ashore in October. In some ways it has been good. I have been able to easily move through the transition of daily activities and year end solutions as it applies to the book keeping and employee earnings. I've been easy to reach by business people who are normally frustrated because they called on a Tuesday or Thursday when I was out fishing. And it's certainly easier to manage a couple restaurants when you are there all the time.

Today was much like yesterday. I worked straight through until 7:00 PM and then met Deb at home for dinner.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

I didn't have to cancel today's trip yesterday. No one wanted to go. And who would? The weather report was not good, terrible in fact. And, frankly, I wouldn't want go either. Tomorrow the National Weather Service is giving gale warnings again. In fact, gale warnings are in effect from this evening through Thursday evening. Ah, the wooden anchors have been way too familiar this season. Such is life. Things change. I will look forward to seeing you on the next good fishing day. And that next good weather day will be Friday, I believe.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the west southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At sunrise, the sky was mostly clear with a beautiful show of color. Those were the clearest skies of the day. By 8:00 AM, the sky was overcast again and remained overcast until around 11:00 AM, when the sun was seen again. We had a mix of sun and clouds until overcast skies took over around 2:00 PM. Rain showers showed took over after that. We had intermittent rain for the rest of the afternoon and during the early evening after sunset. The air temperature rose to a value of 60F, the highest air temperature that I saw (around 2:00 PM). The wind blew out of the west, west northwest and southwest at different times during the day, westerly by the end. Wind speeds were fifteen knots, more or less. I didn't look to see what the wind speeds would have been offshore where we fish. The visibility was excellent except during the rain. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 44F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 31F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 39F).

Another day at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. At this time of year the restaurant is not as busy. The patrons who do visit us are regular patrons, most of whom pick this time of year because there are less people around and they can enjoy the town much more because of it. The Marginal Way can be crowded during the summer. But, at this time of year, it's a fun relaxed walk. The beach, too, isn't as crowded as the summer and a nice walk on it in the morning is something many individuals look forward to. For me, it's easier to get my desk work done, visit different tables and relax a bit in doing so. This fall is much more low key than it was last fall. The weather was much better last year during October.

So I worked straight through until 7:00 PM and then went home, ate dinner and was in bed before 9:00 PM.

Two of my previously mentioned patrons donated $5.00 each to my cancer fund raising charge with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was Jean Young who used to own the Ugly Anne, a party fishing boat out of Perkins Cove. The other was from loyal patron, Kathy Brickey. Both from Ogunquit, they visit Barnacle Billy's enough that it makes it more fun for me when walking through the dinning room. It's always good to see them there. Thank you very much, Kathy and Jean. Very much appreciated!

Thursday, October 18, 2018

I canceled today's trip yesterday despite the fact that I really didn't need to as we had no patrons anyway. This will give me a chance to do some routine work on the Bunny Clark's engine, something I have neglected to do until now.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 36F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The weather day turned out as predicted. The wind blew out of the northwest at twenty-five knots ashore, more or less. The sky was mostly clear. It was chilly all day with the highest air temperature that I saw being 46F. It was probably a degree higher at some point. The visibility was excellent. There was no swell along the shore; nothing for surfers to cheer about! In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 49F with a low of 39F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 44F (with a low of 24F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 46F (with a low of 30F).

So much for the chance to do some maintenance on the B.C. today. I came down at 6:00 AM to find that the furnace at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. wasn't putting out. I had desk work to do anyway, so I waited to make the call. Shortly afterward, I went down to the Bunny Clark to warm up the engine only to get a "blown Extra Supply Fuse" warning on the panel. I got only a click when I tried to turn the engine over. I have two dedicated twelve volt batteries hooked up in series to make twenty-four volts to start the engine. I was showing only 23.9 volts which, in these colder conditions, wasn't enough to start the engine. So I called Bruce Woodfin at the Massachusetts office of Power Products and Skip Dunning, my favorite road tech from Portland (Power Products), to scope out the problem with me. Or, better, tell me what to do! Skip ended up coming down with his computer to hook it up to the engine to see the whole scoop as to what exactly was wrong. That's the thing about these new electronic engines; it's a pain in the ass when you don't have access to one to diagnose a problem but when you do have one, it makes it so much simpler to solve an engine problem. Essentially, my batteries needed to be replaced! It had been eight or ten years since I had installed them, a little too long for battery life.

The rest of the day was spent hauling the batteries out of the boat at 140 pounds each. It requires two other individuals to do it. I had several employees from Barnacle Billy's who helped. Once out of the boat, I drove them to Ed's Batteries in Westbrook, Maine where they had two new fully charged batteries waiting for me. I had called ahead. I have bought every boat battery that I have ever had from them since 1972. They were just as helpful today as they were when I first met them. Wonderful. And so easy! I brought the new batteries back to Perkins Cove where I met my son, Micah. He and I and Stu Dunn, a manager from Barnacle Billy's, helped put the batteries back in the engine room of the Bunny Clark. I was another two hours on the boat working on the engine maintenance items I had originally planned, getting the battery situation finalized, calling those who helped diagnose the problem and cleaning up. I was done by 6:00 PM.

In the meantime I checked on the restaurants. I was back home by 7:00 PM.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 31F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the sky was clear all day without a single drop of rain. The sun seemed bright. But the sun is lower on the horizon now so it spent more time in my eyes than at the beginning of the summer. The wind was strong again today but backed off from being as strong as it had been all this last week. The wind was out of the west at fifteen to twenty knots. The air temperature got up as high as 59F in Perkins Cove. The visibility remained excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 23F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 57F (with a low of 33F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots with seas in chops of two to three feet. Later in the morning, the wind increased out of the southwest to fifteen and twenty knots with seas of two to four feet or more in chops. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature reached a high of 50F. The surface water temperature reached a high of 53.6F. With all this west and northwest wind the last week the surface water temperatures have dropped as expected.

The fishing conditions were good. The conditions could have been better had the chops been a bit smaller. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. There was a great pollock bite all day. Legal landings also included two redfish, two mackerel and a hake. Released fish included fifty-six haddock, thirty cod over 5 pounds, fourteen dogfish and a handful of small cod. Drifting was the fishing method. Everyone used the jig/fly combination. No bait.

Mark Simpson (NH) was far and away the high hook of the day with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 10 pound cod. John Russell (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod. John also caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound cod. He also caught a cod of 10 pounds. The third largest fish was a 13 pound cod caught by Kyle Hunter (PA). Kyle also caught a 10 pound pollock and another cod of 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Andrew Gaudio (MD) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Al Kendall (NY) landed a pollock at bit larger at 10.5 pounds. Charles Wallace (NY) boated a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Mark Feldman (MA) landed the hard luck award by losing two flies. Not such hard luck, I would say! Everyone had plenty of fish when they left the Bunny Clark. I can tell you that it was good just to have a trip today!

Saturday, October 20, 2018

We have no trip today. Nor would there have been a trip. With gale warnings up, the Bunny Clark resides in Perkins Cove for the day.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at twenty-two knots with gusts over twenty-seven knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the southwest at almost thirty knots in gusts for the better part of the morning and, then, started to back off around noon. Winds kept diminishing until there was very little wind at all around sunset. The wind had hauled more westerly at that point as well. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The highest air temperature that I saw in Ogunquit was 64F. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 49F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 64F (with a low of 34F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 38F).

When it became light enough to see, large chops could be seen from the shore cementing the fact that it was another hard wind day.

My day was spent at Barnacle Billy's restaurants. Tomorrow will be the last day of the season that our original restaurant, Barnacle Billy's, will be open. So there were many regulars who I had the pleasure to talk to all day long. This weekend is Ogunquitfest weekend. So there are many people in town and there will be many in the Cove tomorrow to watch the "High Heel Race". So it should be very busy tomorrow. I ended up getting home at 9:30 PM.

Sunday, October 21, 2018

The Bunny Clark will be residing in Perkins Cove for another day. And it's not that I want her to be there.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 45F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the north northeast at ten knots here at the house (more than that off shore) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky at 7:00 AM was overcast and looking like rain. It kept looking like rain for most of the morning. It did rain in Ogunquit for a few minutes, a light rain, just enough to get the road wet. And that was all the rain we had today. By noon, the overcast skies had left us and were replaced by mostly sunny skies and a lot of wind. The wind blew out of the north northwest at twenty-five to thirty knots by 2:00 PM and kept up throughout the daylight hours. The air temperature didn't get much over 46F. Or, at least, I didn't see it any higher. The visibility was excellent. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 53F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 44F (with a low of 34F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 47F (with a low of 31F).

I spent the day at Barnacle Billy's restaurants. It was closing day at our original restaurant. And it was very busy, made more so by the fact that it wasn't warm enough to sit on the deck. Plus, it was too breezy to enjoy it anyway. So everyone was in the dining room. That is everyone was in the dining room after the "high heel race" was over at 4:00 PM. I worked straight through from noon until 9:15 PM. We closed Original at 8:00 PM as we had no one ordering much after 7:00 PM. There were still many patrons inside. But they were "camped out" with the, mostly, regular patrons who send us into the winter every last day. It was really a lot of fun because most everyone there I have seen many times before. And everyone was very happy to be there. Well another part of the season is over. Our other restaurant, Barnacle Billy's, Etc., will remain open daily until November 4th.

I received a generous $100.00 donation from Mike McKay (ME) sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today, a ride dedicated to raising money through the Jimmy Fund for cancer research and care. Thanks so much, Mike. Very thoughtful of you to think of me and very generous. Very much appreciated!

Monday, October 22, 2018

The weather certainly hasn't been cooperating this fall. We have another day at the dock. But we also have a day where the wind is supposed to blow out of the west at twenty-five knots. Tomorrow's weather affords the first break in strong winds. The wind is supposed to blow out of the south at five to ten knots tomorrow increasing to the ten to fifteen knots in the afternoon. Not a bad day. And a day where we have some interest with four anglers signed up to make the trip. That's enough to go! For today, however, the Bunny Clark remains in Perkins Cove with the wooden anchors out!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 31F, the sky was cloudless, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The visibility remained excellent for the whole day. After sunrise, the wind hauled out of the west northwest and blew up to twenty-five knots or more at times. As the day progressed, the wind dropped off. There was very little wind as the sun set and the nearly full moon rose in the eastern horizon over a clear sky. The sky remained clear, cloudless all morning, for most of the day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 50F in Perkins Cove. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 54F with a low of 34F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 23F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 49F (with a low of 29F).

I spent the day working at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., getting caught up with the Bunny Clark desk work and getting the Bunny Clark ready to sail tomorrow. I was heady with anticipation. I haven't been out for two weeks, something that has never happened to me during the season with the Bunny Clark. It's been a hell of a fall. And I don't mean that in a good way. The fishing has been great but the weather has not. Even on some of the passable days we haven't had the patrons. I am looking forward to tomorrow.

Yesterday afternoon when I was going around the dining room at Barnacle Billy's, greeting patrons, wishing customers wonderful winters and making sure everything was running smoothly, I spied Joe Grady sitting at one of the tables beckoning me to come over. Captain Joe Grady used to own and run the deep sea party boat, the Challenger, out of the Merrimack River. Joe was noted for his expertise in catching haddock (in my opinion, the best boat to go on if you wanted haddock) but also being one of the best party boat captains I have ever met. When the haddock regulations changed for the worse and we couldn't keep cod during the season, he gave up and sold his business after decades of taking anglers fishing. I went over to his table where I found he and his wife, Karen, just finishing up with lunch. He had come down to eat at Barnacle Billy's on the day of the season but also to give me a scale that he used to weigh fish aboard the Challenger. It's exactly the same scale that I use when weighing fish. I have always believed that it's the best scale you can buy for weighing fish on the high seas. I was touched. I miss seeing his boat out there. And I miss not having him at the Council meetings we used to attend together. Great guy, Joe. And completely in character by giving me that scale. Such a nice gesture and very much appreciated, particularly for the good luck that I am sure it will bring!

Tim Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Captain Ian Keniston and I are running the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 41F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing lightly out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.

I am presently looking for a deck hand for the rest of this season and for next season. If anyone is interested in the position, you can give us a call at 207-646-2214.

We have many available fishing spots on future fishing trips coming up this week and the next. These vacancies are as follows: We have all twenty fishing spots available on the Wednesday, October 24, extreme day trip, sixteen fishing spots available on the Thursday, October 25, marathon trip, fifteen fishing spots available on the Friday, October 26, extreme day trip and all thirty fishing spots available on the Saturday, October 27, full day trip. We have been having some great catches on the offshore marathon trips with some of the Bunny Clark's biggest fish of the season and a couple of the Bunny Clark's biggest fish all time. It's been really fun. The extreme day trips have been very productive. Some have been as good as you can get. I'm excited about the fall. I guess I'm always excited about the fall. But I'm really interested in seeing how much better we can do this year. I hope you are there with us to experience it! To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214.









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