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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

September 20, 2017, 6:00 AM EDT



Recent Trophy Cusk

The two pictures above were taken on the September 14, 2017 Bunny Clark marathon fishing trip. The shot on the left is a digital image of Ray Westermann (MA) holding his 15 pound cusk. The other digital image shows Rich Gargan (NY) holding his 14 pound Maine state trophy cusk. Ray's fish was about the same length as Rich's but the girth was a bit more. And, of course, the distance of the subject matter from the lens makes Ray's fish look smaller. I could have done a better job. What it does show is the fun of fishing. And it's always great to catch a special fish!




Regulations for the 2017 Bunny Clark Fishing Season



Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it was good in haze. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at twenty knots, more or less. The sky was mostly clear and splotches of white clouds. The visibility was very good. I saw an air temperature of 80F. I'm not sure if the air temperature went any higher or not. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots, tops. Seas were a ripple on the surface, calm to anyone else. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. The tide (current) was strong. They drift fished into the wind all day. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 66.5F.

The fishing conditions were good. The ocean was calm but the current was strong and the dogfish were many. The catching was very good. Many small fish were caught today. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were smallish pollock in the 5 to 7 pound range. Legal landings also included twenty-nine haddock, eight cusk, a monkfish, a redfish and a cunner. Released fish included eighteen market sized cod, ninety sub-legal haddock and ninety-two dogfish. Drifting was the boating method used for fishing. Jigs and cod flies worked best as a combination but bait caught the most haddock.

Dave Yerke (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. He also caught the third largest fish. But there was never a weight taken on it! Ethan Dickinson (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock caught by Ray Vaillancourt (OH). John Russell (ME) landed the hardest luck of the trip award for losing two jigs on the bottom.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops two feet to start, diminishing to a foot. The air temperature got as high as 71F in the shade. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility ranged to fifteen and twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing conditions were very good to excellent. The catching was very good, particularly for sub-legal pollock and mackerel. Landings were just fair - unless you considered mackerel your target species. Legal fish landed included forty-seven mackerel, four cunners and three cusk. Released fish included a few cod, redfish and sculpins. Anchoring was the method. Everyone used bait and cod flies.

Matt Homand (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 6 pound cusk caught by James Balogh (CT). Troy Quick (CT) caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound cusk. Steve VanDyke (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler not to catch a single fish!

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm with slight wind ripples and the visibility over it was as clear as a bell! Although excellent in the morning, the visibility decreased after 10:00 AM with an increase in air temperature, haze and humidity. Good to very good is how I could characterize the visibility. The air temperature rose to 80F. It might have risen a degree or two higher when I wasn't looking. The wind blew out of the west and then west northwest. The west wind lasted until about 10:30 AM, when the west northwest wind arrived. Although the west wind was light, the west northwest wind had gusts to twenty with fifteen knots common throughout. The sky was sunny all day but a haze sun with high cirrus clouds keeping it from becoming the brilliant blue it could have been. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds but, also, a lot of the high thin clouds we had ashore. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were very good, the catching was very good and landings were somewhere between good and very good. Ian said that. I would say that landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 5 to 6 pound size class. There were many legal pollock landed. Legal landings also included thirty haddock, two cusk and fourteen mackerel. Released fish included only twelve dogfish and ten market cod between 4.5 and 7 pounds. They tried one drift which wasn't controllable. They anchored on every spot afterward. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook status was shared between Dave Yerke (NY), Mike Kelso (NY) and Chris Tankred (OH), all three fishing in the bow with jigs and jig sticks. Dave Yerke won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. There were two fish tied for the second largest of the trip. Both fish were pollock of 8.5 pounds. One was caught by Chris Tankred. The other was caught by John Reynolds (ME). Lynn Ross (NY) landed the hard luck award for being involved in the most tangled lines.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the evening half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip today. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less over a rolling two foot long rolling swell. The air temperature got as high as 71F. The sky was overcast. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were good, no better than that, with the dogfish (they released forty-eight), the stronger tide and the small chop. The catching was very good; there were plenty of dogfish, sub-legal pollock and sub-legal haddock along with the legal fish landed. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were small haddock. Legal landings also included four pollock and a redfish. Released fish included three market cod, seventy sub-legal pollock and the dogfish previously mentioned. Drifting was the boating method. Bait and a handful of cod flies were used. The angler with the most fish was the only one using a jig and a fly combination with a jig stick.

Stanley Kowalski, III (MA) was the fisherman of the evening. He won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 5.5 pound cod and he was high hook with the most legal fish, including three haddock. His 4.5 pound pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. Tim Jefferies (CT) caught the second largest fish, a 5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Penello, III (NY) released a 4 pound cod, his largest fish. Jed Kelderhouse (NY) caught a 2 pound haddock. Brady Burch (MA) caught two haddock, the largest weighed 4 pounds, the largest haddock of the evening. Stan Kowalski, Jr. (MA) caught a 3 pound haddock. Aidan Mussen (NY) landed the hard luck award for constantly reeling his hook and line up from the bottom, empty of bait or fish!

Friday, August 18, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly overcast making it darker than normal, there was a light wind from the northeast (so light as to not have any wind) and the visibility over the ocean appeared excellent. Ashore, the sky stayed overcast with the occasional spit of rain until 11:00 AM, when it started to rain. We were, essentially, dry until that time. From that time on it rained for the rest of the morning, all afternoon and into the night. Sometimes the rain was hard. Other times it was light. But it never stopped. The wind blew out of the east, sometimes up to fifteen knots. But the wind was not strong most times. The highest air temperature I saw was 69F in Ogunquit. The visibility was fair in rain, good or better than that otherwise. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a long rolling sea swell of about two feet. The highest air temperature under the canopy was 66F. The first half of the fishing showed the occasional light rain. Near the very end of the fishing it started to rain in ernest. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. In the rain, the visibility was reduced to one and three miles. The sky, of course, was overcast for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good. There was a lot of tide making it hard for me to put a higher value on the day according to Ian's report. The catching was good or better than that (a lot of small fish again). Landings were fair to good, the slowest day trip we have had in a long time. Legal landings included forty-nine pollock that were mostly in the 5 pound range, twenty haddock, two redfish, four cusk, one whiting and a monkfish. Released fish included twenty market cod from 5 pounds to 15.5 pounds, forty-three sub-legal haddock, over twice that many sub-legal pollock and twelve dogfish. Drifting was Ian's boating method for fishing of choice. The tide certainly influenced that decision as there was too much of it to anchor without massive tangles. All terminal gear worked equally well. There were no terminal gear stand outs.

Ian could not determine who was high hook. Brian Hughes (GA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15.5 pound cod, one of the largest cod we have see for a while. He also caught the second largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds, caught by Bob Piel (CT).

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Atkins (PA) caught a 4 pound monkfish. Although small by monkfish standards, this monkfish is the fifth largest, to date, caught on the Bunny Clark this season. Zach O'Connor (NY) landed the hard luck award for being "forced to share his fish and his mother's pole for very little show of appreciation". I guess you had to be there but I'm sure Zach, reading this, will understand.

We had no evening trip today because of the rain. By noon, everyone had canceled.

I took advantage of the extra early quitting time and changed the engine lubricating oil. Jared stayed to help. It took about an hour and a half.

I received two donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge. The ride is over but I continue to raise money to support cancer research until the end of December. The donors and their donations are as follows: Bill & Marie Pimley (NH) for $75.00 in the form of a "egift" through the PMC site and Brian Hughes for $40.00. Thank you for your support and generosity. It means so much to those who are afflicted now and to those in the future who will be.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was overcast, the streets were dry except for the occasional puddle, the wind was light from the northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the weather was beautiful. There was hardly any wind at all in the morning. What wind we did have hailed from the north, three knots or less. The ocean along the shore was calm. The ocean turned flat calm and glassy before noon. After noon, the wind hauled out of the south and blew up to ten knots. The sky was overcast for the whole morning. After noon, the clouds broke, disappeared and the sky became clear, blue and sunny. The sky had a hazy lilt to it as a few high thin clouds remained giving a soft glow to the day. The air was humid. The highest air temperature that I saw was 77F in Perkins Cove around 1:00 PM. The visibility was good over the ocean in haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north at five knots or less. The ocean's surface remained calm. But there were swells. These swells were rollers from two to four feet or more. As a result, a third of the patrons were sea sick! The air temperature rose to a high value of 66F. The sky was overcast for the trip. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were good. With the strong tide, the swells and more anglers than normal down for the count, it wasn't the best of conditions despite the calm surface and the warm temperatures. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, many more than yesterday's trip. Legal landings also included twenty-seven haddock and two cusk. Released fish included eight cod from 5 to 7 pounds and fifty dogfish. They anchored and drift fished. The jig/fly combination caught the most fish.

Walt Klinger, III (ME) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. He caught all these fish on his father's (Walt Klinger, Jr.) jig and home made bucktail fly. Probably the same setup he used to bring when I used to take him fishing all the time - in the old days! Walt, III also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 10 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 9.5 pound pollock caught by Chris Hjerpe (CT).

Other Angler Highlights: Ricco Franchetti (ME) caught the other two largest fish of the trip. They were two pollock, both weighing 9 pounds each. Corey Bessette (VT) landed the hard luck award for earning high hurler status. This is the third time he has fished with us. It's also the third time that he has been incapacitated because of sea sickness. This might be his last trip on the Bunny Clark!

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south five knots. Seas were two feet, more or less, over a calm surface. The air temperature got as high as 66F in the shade. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to five miles in fog/haze. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing conditions were a bit tough with the tide and the larger swells. But they weren't as bad as the morning trip. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Legal landings included twenty haddock, one pollock, one squirrel hake and eleven mackerel. No cod of market size were caught this evening. Twenty-four dogfish were released. They anchored for every spot. Everyone used bait with some cod flies.

There was a tie for the boat pool this evening, a tie for the largest fish caught as well. Both were cod. Both weighed 3.5 pounds. Ethan Blow (VT) caught one while Emily Russell (VT) caught the other. The third largest fish was a 2.5 pound haddock caught by Carson Bertrand (VT). Carson also caught a 2 pound haddock. Mark Gibbs (NH) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the sole hurler of the trip. That's a much better count than today's full day trip!

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the southwest and the visibility over the ocean seemed very good. Ashore, the air started out humid but was less so by noon. The wind blew out of the west and then northwest. Out of the west, the wind blew about ten knots. When the wind hauled out of the northwest, around 9:00 AM, the wind blew up to more than twenty knots in gusts. This wind, stronger than we have seen for a few weeks, kept up until early afternoon, at least. By 4:00 PM, the wind had backed off substantially. The air temperature got up to at least 80F in Ogunquit. The sky was mostly blue and brilliantly sunny. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten knots, more or less. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 70F. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility ranged to over fifteen miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were not the best. There were more dogfish than we have seen on almost any trip this season and the tide was running a river (1.6 knots or more on the drift). Catching was good or better than that if you include the dogfish! Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-eight haddock and two cusk. Released fish included six small market cod, a wolffish and over one hundred and ten dogfish. Anchoring was the only method available to allow the terminal gear to tend bottom correctly. There was still quite an angle on the lines with the tide.

Bryce Parent (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Abe Bradeen (ME). Third place was shared by three anglers, all with 10 pound pollock each. The anglers included Katie Bernier (ME), Max VanOrman (VT) and Cecelia Packard (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Arsenault (ME) started off the pool with the first fish big enough to weigh, a 9 pound pollock. Paul Devlin (UK) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick out of the six anglers who were! There must have been some kind of hidden swell or maybe the tide running that hard gave some the whirlies!

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five knots or less. The ocean's surface was smooth over a long rolling sea swell of about two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 70F under the canopy. The visibility ranged to over twelve miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing conditions were excellent (no tide and no dogs), the catching was good and landings, if you like mackerel, were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were mackerel. Most fish caught tonight were also mackerel. Legal landings also included a cusk. Released fish included one small market cod, a pile of mackerel, quite a few sub-legal pollock and six redfish. Drifting was the method. It was a perfect drift. Everyone used bait. Some also included the cod flies. The cod flies caught the most mackerel, by far.

Nine year old Paul McCullough (MA) was high hook with the most mackerel. He had at least eighteen mackerel, most he released. Neal Pease (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. Kate Mohr (IA) caught the second largest fish, a 4 pound cod. Matt O'Hern (CA) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler not to catch a fish.

I received two generous donations sponsoring my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. One was for $150.00 from Marc & Claire St. Onge (ME) and the other, a very generous donation, was for $500.00 from Joe & Lynne Goodman (MA). Thank you so much for thinking of me and my quest to find out more about how to cure cancer. It's a big step, a big problem and something that has to be addressed financially every day. The ride is over but the fund raising never ends. Nor will cancer be cured without the extra effort. I very much appreciate your help!

Solar Eclipse, Monday, August 21, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was milky clear, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the wind was very light all morning. The ocean was flat calm. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest and blew up to five or ten knots or so. The visibility dropped a bit in haze to a value of good, in my opinion. The air temperature rose to 81F, the highest number I saw this day. It was humid and a bit uncomfortable. The sky was a hazy clear with high thin clouds part of the sky all day. At the time of the Solar Eclipse, the sky was the clearest it had been all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west to southwest at five to ten knots. Essentially, the ocean was calm all day with no more than a one foot chop (or less) for the whole time they were fishing. There was an underlying swell of about two feet. The air temperature rose to a value of 69F under the canopy top. The tide (current) was strong in the morning, nothing at high water slack and strong again after slack water. The sky was sunny and mostly clear in a hazy sort of way. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good. That's because the tide was a bit too strong and there were many unwanted dogfish, the most Ian has seen on one of his trips this season so far. Jared had about the same amount yesterday on his trip - for less time fishing! The catching was excellent; there were many sub-legal fish to go with the dogfish and legal fish. Landings were good to very good depending on whether you were Wayne Statham (QC) or not. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-nine haddock, two cusk, a white hake and seven mackerel. Released fish included only four cod of very small market size, one barndoor skate and one hundred and eight dogfish. Drifting was the method (they had an opposing wind). All terminal gear worked well but Jigs and flies were most productive.

Wayne Statham was high hook with the most legal fish of anyone. He was a standout in that category today. For him, it was a fish a cast all day long, including sub-legal fish. His largest was an 11 pound pollock, a tie for the third largest fish of the trip. Michelle Bachand (MA) also caught an 11 pound pollock.

Liam Jenks (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound barndoor skate. This is only the second barndoor skate that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. And it's the second largest by 7 pounds. Ian took a picture of Liam and his big skate just before releasing it. That digital image appears on the left. The barndoor skate is still listed internationally as an endangered species. So every one caught has to be released alive. And this one was very much alive! The second largest fish was a 12 pound pollock caught by Schan Martin (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Andrew Daunis (CT) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Graydon McCormick (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Joe Jenks (MA) also caught a 10 pound pollock. Malcolm McCormick (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

There was also a turtle sighting today. It was a big leatherback turtle. They used to be more common when I was younger. But, then, when we saw them, we were tuna fishing, looking from high masts all day long. So maybe if I were doing the same now I would have a different opinion about the turtle population. Anyway, it's rare to see one from water level aboard the Bunny Clark.

Maine does it's part in the Federal Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP). Bruce Joule has been the head of Maine's Marine Recreational Program at the Department of Marine Resources in Boothbay Harbor, Maine for years. Bruce does a damn good job and is so very helpful to me. Periodically he sends people down to go on the Bunny Clark. His researchers measure fish, question anglers about participation and find out information that might be useful to further responsible recreational fishing access into the future. It's a great program. Without the state's support I feel that we could get "run over" by commercial interests. Today we had Cassie Nixon and Matt Withee aboard. They couldn't be nicer. And I feel more comfortable about the numbers of fish released when I see those figures at the end of the day. My only regret is that some of my contemporaries won't allow the DMR to put representatives on their vessels. That is their right. But it certainly isn't good. By doing so it skews the data and it will take us longer to figure out how the marine angler can take part in the future of our fishery.

Tim Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, today, I was told it was hot, hazy and humid. The air temperature in Ogunquit rose to 84F. It was sunny all day. And they had a nice breeze from the southwest most of the day. At 9:00 PM, the air temperature in Perkins Cove was still 80F, one of those warm summer nights. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 59F).

The trip to the fishing grounds was really nice. There was just enough wind to cool temperatures down enough so it was comfortable. Seas were small chops pushed by a five knot breeze. The visibility was good. The sky was clear. There was no threat of rain.

On the grounds, the wind was blowing out of the south southwest. This wind steadily increased from five knots to ten knots and, by noon, fifteen knots. Seas increased to two feet or a little more. The sky was hazy clear. The air temperature reached a high of 72F. The tide (current) was strong to moderate. The visibility, probably ten miles or so in the morning, decreased to six miles, max, by noon. It was very hazy. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65.4F.

The fishing, catching and landings were just south of excellent all day. The fishing conditions would have been excellent had there not been so much tide. We had few dogfish, none on the first stop. And only thirty or so for the whole day, most of them caught by Ben Gershman (IL) - he was using a double bait rig with both hooks at dogfish level! Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Most of the pollock were of good size today. After the first half hour I only weighed fish of 11 pounds or greater. Legal landings also included twenty haddock, a cusk and a redfish. Released fish included the dogfish previously mentioned, twenty-two cod from 5 pounds to 14 pounds and twenty-eight sub-legal haddock. We anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well but the jig/fly/jig stick combination was responsible for the most fish.

Although I didn't count his fish, I do believe that Charlie Collier (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Not only did he land quite a few double keeper catches but he was quick in boating and re-setting to start again. He did have one bad tangle with the stern (he was fishing in the bow) but that was because he let his jig drop too quickly, the tide sweeping his terminal gear aft. He was in much better control after that. Some of Charlie's good fish included a 17.5 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock, a 15.5 pound pollock and a double that included an 8.5 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time (the definition of a double, in case you don't read this site where I hammer this definition home - too often for some!).

Peter Sever (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. He also caught a pollock that weighed 13.5 pounds and a cod that weighed 12.5 pounds, released, of course. The second largest fish was a 19 pound pollock caught by thirteen year old David Vizzini (NY). This fish was caught as part of a double that also included a 10 pound pollock. As of this writing that double is the seventh largest double of the Bunny Clark season. David also caught a double that included a 16 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. He also caught the largest cod of the day at 14 pounds. George Lee (NJ) caught the third largest fish of the trip, an 18.25 pound pollock. George also boated a double that included a 17 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock and landed another pollock of 15 pounds. The fourth largest fish was an 18 pound pollock caught by Jane Brown (VT). She also caught a lot of other fish including many small medium pollock, haddock and another bigger pollock that weighed 13 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Pat Walsh (NY) caught a 16 pound pollock and a double that included a 12 pound pollock and a 15 pound pollock. He also caught the largest cod double of the day with a cod that weighed 5 pounds with another that weighed 12 pounds. Chris Brown (VT) caught a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Dave Boisjoli (VT) boated a 12 pound pollock. Jared Lafreniere (NH) boated a pollock that weighed 14.25 pounds, his biggest fish. Simon Ng (NJ) caught a 16 pound pollock. Although Simon caught a lot of fish today, that was his largest fish by far. Dawn Stever (VT) landed the hard luck award for "feeling" sea sick. She did not stay fishing for long, choosing to lay down on the engine hatch for most of the day. I never did witness the evidence of her breakfast. Nor did she ever lose that good sense of humor. On a different day she would have been fine.

Captain Jared Keniston and I ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at fifteen knots to start. As the night progressed the wind increased to about twenty knots. Seas to start were about two to three feet. But, by the time we were ready to call it a night, the seas had increased to three and four feet with the occasional queer one besides. The air temperature reached a high of 69F under the canopy. The visibility ranged no more than six miles. The tide (current) was light. The sky was clear turning overcast on the way back in.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing conditions (except for the tide) were not good. The seas made many angler sea sick. But there were even more anglers sick on the ride back to Perkins Cove! The catching and landings were good. Legal landings included fifteen pollock, six haddock, a redfish and three butter mullet. Released fish included thirty-five or so dogfish, for very small cod, a redfish, four sub-legal haddock and a few sub-legal pollock. The dogfish created more tangles than there should have been. All anglers used bait alone or the bait and cod fly combination. Most fish were caught on the flies. We anchored all evening.

I just don't know who was high hook. That's because some of the better anglers were releasing their legal fish without my help. Pasquale Carbone (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.5 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 6.5 pound pollock caught by Matt Calver (MA). Matt also caught a 4 pound pollock earlier. There was a tie for third place. Both George Germanos (MA) and Sebastian Theriault (QC) each landed a pollock that weighed 6.25 pounds. George also caught a 5.75 pound pollock. Sebastian also caught a 5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim Petit (MA) caught a 4 pound pollock and a few haddock and could have been high hook. Stephen Kapantais (MA) looked to me to be having the hardest time controlling is equilibrium. So I awarded him "the shirt".

I received a $25.00 donation from Steve Guilmet (MA) sponsoring me in my quest for a cancer free world with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Steve has been a long time supporter of mine. Thank you so much, Steve. The only thing better would be if I could see you fishing with me once again! I appreciate your help. All the best!

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo were supposed to be running the full day trip today. Alas, the weather forecast in angler's minds was stronger than the desire to go fishing. The wooden anchors went out and stayed out for both trips. There were only three calls for the day trip yesterday and none for the evening trip.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 69F, the sky was clear, the wind was light from the west and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. The wind blew from the west most of the day. It hauled more west southwest in the afternoon. Wind speeds got up to fifteen knots or more on shore. But winds weren't nearly as strong as they were predicted to be. After noon, the wind dropped off. By mid afternoon, winds were light from the west southwest. The sky was mostly clear all day. The air temperature rose to a value of 80F in Perkins Cove. The day was much less humid after yesterday, the most humid day of the season so far. The visibility was very good from the shore looking over the ocean. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 69F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 56F).

I spent the morning working on the Bunny Clark. We had key switch issues that I needed direction on. I had called Bruce Woodfin at Power Products in Wakefield, Massachusetts the night before. He had put me on the right track (I love that guy!) so that I knew what to do today. We also had an issue with a boost pressure sensor. Skip Dunning from Power Products in Portland, Maine came down at 9:00 AM to check that out for me. All simple stuff when you know what you are doing. Skip has been so valuable to me over the years. I don't know of anyone better on the road. Or so easy to get along with. We've had a great working relationship for many years now. By 10:00 AM, I was done with the boat.

After an hour on the bike, I took a shower and worked in the restaurant for the rest of the day and night.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was cloudless, there was a complete lack of wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind started to blow out of the west at five knots or so. There was less wind right along the coast. The ocean was flat calm all morning. After noon, the wind was light from the south southwest. The air temperature reached a value of 80F on my watch. The visibility was good to very good along the shore. The sky remained mostly blue and clear. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The air temperature reached a high of 70F under the shade top. The visibility was good in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing, fishing conditions, catching and landings were very good all day long. Most legal fish landed were pollock of the small to medium variety. But the bite was a fish a cast for those fishing with a jig, fly and jig stick. Legal landings also included twelve haddock, four cusk and seven mackerel. Released fish included twenty market sized cod to 10.5 pounds, twelve dogfish and thirty-seven sub-legal haddock. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but the jig/fly combination worked the best.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. There were too many anglers who did really well today. Norm Herrick (MA/ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second largest fish category went to two anglers, Jay Kennedy (VT) and Alex Schwartz (NY), both with pollock of 11.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Janina Ciparien (ME) caught the largest cod, the 10.5 pounder mentioned above. It was released alive, of course. John Wormle (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer!

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or so. The air temperature got as high as 70F in the shade. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were very good, the catching was very good and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, probably the most haddock we have seen on an afternoon trip for a long time. Legal landings also included two pollock, three cusk and two mackerel. Released fish included five dogfish and four market sized cod of 4 or 5 pounds each. Anchoring was the boating method. Everyone used bait. Some used bait and cod flies.

I didn't ask who was high hook. Nor did Ian volunteer that information. Luke Keizer (NLD) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound cusk. The second largest fish was a 5.75 pound cusk caught by Mark Reynolds (NY). He also caught the fourth largest fish, a 5 pound pollock. Alex Keizer (NLD) caught the third largest fish of the trip, a 5.25 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Tangie Wilkerson (TX) landed a 2.5 pound haddock. Eight year old Maya Keats (NY) caught a 4 pound pollock. The largest haddock of the evening weighed 3.5 pounds and was caught by an angler who wishes to remain anonymous. Jamin Johnson (MN) lost his first ever keeper haddock to a blue shark. Jamin landed the hard luck award for his situation!

Norm & LuAnne Herrick (MA/ME) donated $90.00 to support my fund raising efforts to fight cancer with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. They have been frequent donors of my cause since I first started this project eleven years ago! Thank you again and again for your sponsorship and generosity. I do so appreciate the help!

Friday, August 25, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light out of the north northeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind was light all day. The ocean along the shore was calm. At sunrise, the wind was blowing out of the north. The wind died around noon making the ocean look like a mill pond, it was so calm. The wind hauled out of the south southeast in the early afternoon and continued to hang around into the night. The highest air temperature I saw was 73F. The visibility was very good. The sky was mostly clear and sunny all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 54F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at five to ten knots and then dropped to variable in direction with wind speeds less than five knots. The ocean went from a one foot chop to flat calm. The air temperature went from warm to hot (no temperature value was given). The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were good. They would have been considered better if the target species included dogfish. Seventy dogfish were caught and released. The catching was excellent (including dogfish). Landings were very good despite the dogs! Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 4 to 7 pound range, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-nine haddock, two cusk and two mackerel. Twenty cod from 5 pounds to 16.25 pounds were released. One wolffish was also caught and released. Drifting and anchoring were both used as methods to control the fishing. All terminal gear worked well but jigs, flies and jig sticks caught the most legal fish.

Mark Mehmajewsky (MN) was high hook with the most legal fish. There was not a question. He caught fish from the moment he started fishing until it ended, a fish a cast. Mark never caught a fish as large as 10 pounds. Joe Remkus (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.25 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 14 pound cod caught by Neil Rohan (VT). Alycia Kratoville (NY) caught the third largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Remkus (PA) caught the largest pollock of the trip. It weighted 10 pounds. Peter Brodeur (QC) landed the hard luck award for being involved in the most tangled lines!

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or less. The air temperature only reached a high of 66F in the shade. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing conditions were very good and the dogfish count was way down. The catching was good. Landings were fair. Legal landings included five haddock, a cusk, a monkfish and a mackerel. Released fish included six dogfish, twenty sub-legal haddock and two small market cod. They anchored and drift fished. Everyone used bait with some cod flies.

It was the evening of the O'Keefes. Jim O'Keefe (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cusk caught by Mike O'Keefe (MA). John O'Keefe (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Mehlman (NH) caught a 2.5 pound monkfish. Tyler Normant (MA) landed the hard luck award for being "starving hungry" and not catching a single legal fish.

I received several donations sponsoring my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Three of the donors, for a total of $75.00, wanted to remain anonymous. The other donors, Jersey Tim & Nancy Hesselink (NJ), gave $25.00 to the cause. Thank you all so very much for your support. I really appreciate your helping me on this!

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was a cooler 52F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no noticeable wind along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, we had light winds all day. There was light northwest winds in the morning, a period of flat calm water and, after noon, a light southwest breeze. At no time were flags lifted, to my knowledge. The ocean was calm along the shore all day. The air temperature reached a high of 74F in Ogunquit, the highest air temperature that I saw. The sky was clear and sunny. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 43F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five knots or so and then died out to nothing. The ocean was mirror calm from late morning until the B.C. arrived back in Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 72F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good, much better than that if there hadn't been sixty-three dogfish that were caught in the process. The catching was very good as were landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included forty haddock, five cusk and a mackerel. Released fish included twenty market to large cod and seventy-eight sub-legal haddock. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies, the combination, caught the most good fish.

Brian Murphy (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with twenty legal and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound cod. This is the largest cod we have seen in weeks. Brian also landed the second largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. Brian's better half, Marian "Merv" Murphy, tied with Steve Greenlaw (ME) for the third largest fish at ten pounds. Both anglers caught a 10 pound pollock each. Merv's keeper count was fourteen and was probably second hook.

Other Angler Highlights: Mike Kinney (ME) caught a 9.5 pound pollock. Josh Karkos (ME) landed the hard luck award for the simple reason that he was going to get married in the near future. No one had any hard luck today.

Captain Ian Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest five knots or so. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 68F in the shade. The visibility ranged to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was good and landings (if you didn't include mackerel) were fair. Most legal fish caught were mackerel, by far. In fact, they could have loaded the boat with them had they been the targeted species. Legal landings also included four haddock and a cusk. Released fish included thirty-two dogfish and one very small market cod. They anchored for the evening. Everyone used bait. Some also included the flies. Most fish were caught on the flies.

Nine year old Paige Taylor (NY) was probably high hook with eleven mackerel. This was because she was constantly dropping her line to bottom and reeling it up. In so doing, she would hook a mackerel every time. This also got her the most tangles which also put her in the number one slot for the recipient of the hard luck award! Nick Beaulieu (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.25 pound market cod. The second largest fish was a 4 pound cusk caught by John Cotter (MA). Connor O'Brien (VT) landed the third largest fish, a 2.75 pound haddock.

I received three donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event that funnels money to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachsetts. Better known as the Jimmy Fund, every rider raised dollar (one hundred percent) goes to research and care. These wonderful people and their donations included: Dave & Rebecca Symes (ME) for a generous $100.00, Brian & Marian Murphy for a generous $125.00 and Glen Voilusz (NH) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for you support and help. It means a lot to me that feel as I do about this.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. Ashore, the wind blew out of the east or north of east at five to ten knots but maybe not quite ten. Somewhere between. I really never saw white caps. The wind off the water made the day take longer to warm up. In fact, it never really did get warm. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 72F. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 43F).

On the fishing grounds, it did blow the full ten knots. There the wind was out of the northeast. Seas were chops of a foot to a foot and a half. The air temperature reached a high of 62F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility was very good, ranging to over twenty miles. The sky was sunny all day with few clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.6F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good. There were a few dogfish but they were biting mostly on bait. The jig fishermen didn't have much of a problem. The weather conditions were nearly perfect. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock of the 5 to 8 pound category, by far. Legal landings also included thirteen haddock, three cunners and four cusk. Released fish included forty-five dogfish, seven market sized cod (small markets) and twenty-six sub-legal haddock. Jared drift fished and anchored, both. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Jared didn't know who was high hook. Holly Lapierre (NY) caught the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. Holly was not entered into the boat pool. Tristan Winslow (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Pat Frasier (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. Tom VanDyke (NJ) landed the hard luck award for putting the fly hook right through his ear!

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind had died out to nothing. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade. The visibility ranged to twenty miles or better. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 65F.

The fishing conditions were excellent, the catching was very good but landings were fair at best, good if you considered mackerel. Most legal fish landed were mackerel, by far. Had they been set up for them they could have loaded the boat with mackerel. Most anglers did not want the mackerel. Legal landings also included four whiting. Released fish, besides mackerel, included a few cod (only one small market) and a quite a few sub-legal sized pollock. Drifting was the boating method. Everyone used bait and some cod flies. The mackerel were savage on the flies.

Eric Schneider (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 4.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 2.25 pound cod caught by Ed Chambers (NY). Matt Spera (ME) came in at number three, for size, with a 2 pound whiting.

Other Angler Highlights: Michael Russo (MA) caught a whiting that weighed a pound. Cody Mansfield (ME) also caught a whiting that weighed a pound. Eight year old Mateiah Asali (ME) landed the hard luck award for stepping backward and putting her foot/shoe into a full fillet bucket of water, soaking her leg up to her knee! She told me at the dock that her shoe had dried. It was such a beautiful night on the ocean that no one really had any hard luck.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was a mirror under the stars and the visibility over it was excellent. Ashore, there was just a slight wind from the east. Not enough to move a flag but enough so that you might notice it was cooler on the east side of the building and warmer on the western side. The ocean was calm all day. The sky was cloudless for most of the day. The visibility was very good. The air temperature reached a high of 74F in Perkins Cove. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 43F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots or so in the morning and then hauled out of the east with the same wind speed. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 69F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in some haze. The sky was clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing conditions would have been excellent had it not been for the dogfish. The catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 5 to 7 pound range. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock, two cusk, one redfish and a white hake. Released fish included forty-five market cod to 10 pounds, a wolffish, forty-eight sub-legal haddock and seventy-six dogfish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies, the combination, worked the best for catching fish.

Either Rick Hunt (VT), Dan Killay (VT) or Ken Carter (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. It was an epic day for numbers of legal fish, sub-legal fish and dogfish. Drew Raymond (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound pollock. It was Drew's birthday today, he and his father celebrating this day with a trip on the Bunny Clark. What a better way to end a fishing trip! He also tied for the third largest fish of the day with Scott Berger (VT) at 10 pounds. Drew's fish was a cod, the largest cod of the trip, while Scott's fish was a pollock. Ken Carter caught the second largest fish, an 11 pound pollock. Ken also caught the largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. And that's one of the largest haddock we have seen in weeks!

Other Angler Highlights: Rick Hunt caught the first fish that Ian could weigh today. It was a pollock of 9.5 pounds. Vikorija Vejelyte (LTU) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines!

I received a $50.00 donation from Jules & Sue Epstein (FL) sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. They are regular patrons of ours at Barnacle Billy's restaurants and have been for many years. This is the first time they have supported me financially in the PMC. Thank you very much Jules & Sue. I do very much appreciate your help!

Tim Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Gary Scott full day trip charter (most from Maine Med.) today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was cooler 48F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind, the ocean was very calm and the visibility over it was excellent.

We had another calm ride to the fishing grounds, just like the last few mornings. The sky was sunny to start but then clouded over and remained overcast for the day. It was a thin overcast with the sun a hazy dull yellow orb for most of the time. The visibility was very good.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five knots all day. The sea state was a small chop of not quite a foot. And no white caps.The air temperature reached a high of 68F in the shade. The visibility ranged to a maximum of twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was light. The sky was overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing conditions were excellent. The catching was good. Landings were fair to good, one of the slower days for landings we have had this month. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, with two good sized ones. Most were under 7 pounds. Legal landings also included eight haddock, twelve cusk, a white hake, three cunners and two mackerel. Released fish included forty-six dogfish, twenty-seven haddock and three market sized cod from 5 to 8 pounds. We drift fished and anchored. Cod flies caught the most legal fish.

Molly Williams (LA) was high hook with eight legal fish, mostly pollock and a haddock. She was using a jig stick, jig and fly. She also caught the largest mackerel of the Bunny Clark season, to date. It was just shy of 2 pounds! I took a picture that Molly gave me and edited it to fit this page. That digital image of Molly and her mackerel appears on the left. Her largest fish was probably a 7 pound pollock.

We had a tie today for the boat pool, the two largest fish of the trip. Both fish were pollock of 18 pounds each, exactly 18 pounds! Justin Vallas (ME) caught the first one. Bob Landry (ME) caught the second one about an hour or so later about a mile from the spot where Justin caught his. The third largest fish was a 10 pound pollock caught by Jason Ahearn (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Melissa Fairfield (ME) caught the first fish big enough to weigh for the boat pool, a 9.25 pound pollock. Laura Alonzo (LA) caught the fourth largest fish of the trip, a 9.5 pound pollock. Jen Pike (ME) landed the hard luck award for looking most like she was going to hurl. She didn't. There were two women close to the edge. Both made it back to the dock unscathed!

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was cooler 57F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The wind continued to blow out of the northeast at ten knots more or less. By the end of the daylight hours, the wind had dropped to nothing, leaving the ocean along the shore calm with a big sea crashing on the shore. The sky was overcast all morning, sunny by noon. The air temperature reached a high, that I saw, of 70F. The visibility was very good looking out to sea. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet over two to three foot swell out of the southeast. The air temperature reached a high in the shade of 66F. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in some haze. The tide was moderate. The sky was overcast in the morning and clear in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing conditions were good, at least. There were a few dogfish to create tangles and the chop didn't favor everyone, certainly. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 5 to 7 pound range. Legal landings also included twenty-three haddock, three cusk, one redfish, a white hake and a butter mullet. Released fish included sixty-six dogfish, a wolffish and twenty-nine sub-legal haddock. They anchored for every stop. All terminal gear worked well.

Ralph Bedard (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish of any angler aboard. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 10 pound wolffish. This is the largest wolffish we have seen in a while. Arnie Ulrich (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 9 pound pollock caught by Carolyn Prescott (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Willa Moore (ME) landed the hard luck award for not keeping her stomach in tune with the motion of the ocean. She never did wet a line.

I received two donations from local captains sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. In my work clothes, my shoes specifically, I have pink laces. Every time someone notices them, I tell them; "That's 5 bucks." I, of course, explain the reason behind it. So far this season my pink laces have gained me $545.00 in donations. Some have donated more than $5.00. But most go along with my wishes. Today Captain Jack Gordon (ME) and Bob Asquith (ME) acquiesced for $5.00 each after making fun of my laces. Thank you both very much. I appreciate you digging out your wallets at my request. You didn't really have to but you did. And I appreciate it!

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the first fall marathon trip of the season today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least.

There was foam on the surface of the water in the channel leading out of Perkins Cove, in the outer harbor and along the shore in general. This created by the large storm that rolled north off the coast, well off shore, and into Maritime Canada. Seas were very large. They weren't breaking at the mouth of the harbor. But going out through the mouth in the dark made me wonder. For a mile I had to keep the cruising speed down to avoid going over a "cliff hanger". But, after that mile, the seas seemed to widen, offering us a nice full run to the fishing grounds.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the west at ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot. Later in the morning the westerly wind increased to fifteen knots with a chop of about two feet. For most of the day and into the afternoon the wind and sea state were the same. Around 2:00 PM, the wind hauled out of the northwest and blew fifteen to twenty knots with seas in chops of two to three feet. All day long we had sea swells of eight to ten feet underneath the chops. These were spaced well apart. Occasionally we caught a queer one of almost twelve feet (as noted on the sounding machine). The air temperature reached a high of 70F in the shade. The visibility ranged to a maximum of thirty miles. It was still hazy a bit; the hills along the shore were not sharp at thirty miles. The tide (current) was light in the morning to moderate in the afternoon.. The sky was mostly clear with a little bit of cloudiness half way back to Perkins Cove. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 44F).

The fishing conditions, the catching and landings were very good today. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 4 to 5 pound range. We also had a number of pollock, though not nearly as many, in the 9 to 15 pound range. Legal landings also included thirty-three haddock, thirty-seven redfish, seven cusk and one big white hake. Released fish included forty-three cod from 5 to 14 pounds, sixty-four dogfish and twenty-four sub-legal haddock. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies were responsible for most of the legal fish landed today.

I don't know for sure who was high hook. I know that Fred Kunz (NH) caught forty-four legal and released sixteen market cod. But I do believe that Dan Lee (NH) caught more fish than Fred. I don't know this for sure. But while Fred was fishing with a single jig with no fly for over an hour in the morning, Dan was fishing with a jig and a fly, boating doubles and catching something on the fly with every drop. Both he and Fred continued to catch fish at the same pace throughout the day. Fred caught the largest cusk at 11.5 pounds and the largest cod at 14 pounds. His largest pollock was 15 pounds but he caught another that made the 10 pound minimum for weighing. I weighed two 9 pound pollock for Dan before the first fish of 10 pounds was boated. Dan went on to catch an 18 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock, his two biggest fish. The 18 pounder tied with Ken Carter (ME) for the second largest fish of the trip. That was the only fish over 10 pounds for Ken even though he too caught a lot of fish. Third hook?

Steve Selmer (NH) was fourth hook. He also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 31 pound Maine state trophy white hake.This is the largest hake the Bunny Clark has seen since July 18, 2017. And on that day Steve caught a 38 pound Maine state trophy hake! I took a picture today of Steve's big hake. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. Some of Steve's other good fish included an 11 pound cod and a 2.1 pound Maine state trophy redfish. He had one pollock that I didn't weigh that looked to be about 10 pounds but no more than that. I took another picture of Steve's trophy redfish. This digital image appears on the right in this entry.

I also have to mention the fight Nick Rello (NJ) had later in the afternoon. He hooked into something on the bottom that he fought for at least fifteen minutes before losing it just before we could see the fish. Nick had leader material well into his reel when the jig he was using broke off. There was one hundred and twenty feet of leader line ahead of his main line. We were anchored at the time on a edge of gravel in forty fathoms of water. The fish stayed, pretty much, straight up and down. To me it seemed like every halibut we have caught that was foul hooked. It took line several times headed straight to bottom. But I don't think it ever got as far as the bottom before Nick would gain line again. I hate to lose big fish or see them lost. But, worse, I hate to see them lost without knowing what they were!

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Vossler (CT) caught the first cusk of the day, an 8 pounder. He also caught the first good sized double of the day with two pollock. One weighed 8.5 pounds and the other weighed 12 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Chris' largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock. Chris and his son, Robb, did very well on numbers of legal fish. Robb Vossler (CT) landed a 12.75 pound pollock, his largest fish. His largest cod weighed 10 pounds. Rick Wixon (NH) landed a pollock that weighed 17.25 pounds, his largest fish and the fourth largest fish of the trip. Alan Crowder (NH) boated a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bill Lee (NH) released a cod that weighed 11.25 pounds. His largest pollock was exactly 10 pounds. But he might have caught one slightly larger that I didn't weigh. Cody Ouimette (VT) caught a 16 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He caught a double that included a 9 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. Matt Carter (ME) had a hard time getting going this morning He didn't feel well enough, after hurling a couple times on the way out. However, he recovered and caught fish. Since he was the only hurler, he landed the hard luck award as well!

I was sponsored by a couple anglers today in my quest for a cancer free world with my involvement the Pan-Mass Challenge, a two day charity cycling event that takes place the first Saturday of August every year. One donation was for $20.00 from an individual who wants to remain anonymous. The other two donations were from Fred & Betsy Kunz. One was for $192.00 and the other was for a $1.00. Thank you all for your support and generosity in this project. It means much to me but more to those who will never know who this kind donors might be!

Friday, September 1, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be running the full day trip today. Alas, there was not enough interest (the weather report for high winds certainly had a part in our cancellation). The wooden anchors stayed out for this day as the Bunny Clark resided peacefully in Perkins Cove!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. The sky stayed clear and the air temperature was on the cool side all day. The highest air temperature I saw in Perkins Cove was 66F. It could have been higher but I didn't see it. At sunrise, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten to fifteen knots. After 10:00 AM, the wind started to pick up in speed. By noon, the northwest wind was blowing at twenty to twenty-five knots with some higher gusts to thirty knots. The sky stayed mostly clear all day. The visibility over the ocean was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 41F).

I used the extra unexpected time in the morning to go on a longer than normal bike ride with some friends from the Kennebunkport area. The rest of the day I spent at Barnacle Billy's restaurants. It was a good day but nothing exceptional happened that might be worth mentioning here. And that's probably a good thing.

I received a few small donations from friends and patrons sponsoring me in my fund raising event to find the key to solving the cancer question with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Those donors and their donations were as follows: Micheal Koppstein (ME) for $5.00, Tim Ducharme (ME) for $5.00 and Harry & Susan Bajakian, Rick and Chris for $29.00. Thank you all so very much for looking at the pink laces. The fact that you followed through speaks volumes about the good people you are. And I appreciate both the donations and the kindness.

Saturday, September 2, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 47F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at twelve knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good indeed. The sky was sunny all morning and into the afternoon with few clouds. Near the end of the daylight hours, high thin clouds were starting to cover the sky. The wind blew out of the west northwest in the morning before going light and calm. From there, the wind hauled out of the west and southwest and blew up to ten knots with higher gusts. The air temperature got up to 70F before the wind off the water turned the tide and the air temperature slowly went south. The visibility was excellent for most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 43F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 35F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west northwest at five knots or so. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged over fifteen miles. The sky was sunny and clear. The surface water temperature dropped to 58.7? That's a departure from the temperature it has been.

The fishing conditions were very good but the tangles today prevented landings from going over the top. The tangles were created mostly by the sixty-five dogfish that were caught. The catching was very good. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, in a range of sizes. Legal landings also included seventeen haddock, two cusk, a mackerel and two redfish. Released fish included eighteen market cod to 14.5 pounds, the previously mentioned dogfish and thirty sub-legal haddock. Drifting and anchored were the boating methods employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the lions share of the landings. High hook could not be determined today. But I was told it was between Brian Murphy (NH - Murphy-Clark Band: "Another Hit" on youtube if you get a chance - Brian is the lead vocalist), Duane King (MA - of course), Dean Wolf (NJ) and Justin King (MA). I know Brian had twelve legal. The others didn't count. Brian won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. That was his biggest fish by far. Dean Wolf caught the second and third largest fish of the trip. They included a 15 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Duane King caught a 12 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. His son, Justin King, released a 12.5 pound cod that he caught. That was his biggest fish. Dick Slocum (NJ) caught a 10 pound cod. Dan Angelo (MA) landed the first fish that Jared could weigh today. It was a 10 pound pollock. Marian "Merv" Murphy (NH), Brian's better half, landed nine legal fish. She appears in the video link above with Brian on stage in Newport. She is the second musician from the left. Michael Anderson (NH) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines. Ouch!

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the afternoon half day (4 PM - 8 PM) trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind had already hauled out of the south southwest at ten to twelve knots. Seas had built to two feet, more or less. The air temperature reached a high of 63F in the shade. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing conditions were very good, much better than the day trip and no dogfish. The catching was very good for, mostly, mackerel. It wasn't quite as good for the groundfish unless you include the sub-legal pollock that had to be released. Landings were poor for groundfish, very good for mackerel. Legal landings included a whiting, a cusk, quite a few mackerel and a pollock. Released fish included the small pollock, a few mackerel, a couple redfish, one market cod and a sea raven. They anchored all evening. Everyone used bait and some cod flies.

Lauren Delano (MA) lost a big fish. I would have liked to have known what it was. It definitely would have won the boat pool. She caught the second largest fish, a 4 pound cod, released of course. Kris Davis (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7.25 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 1.75 pound whiting caught by Ernie McCarthy (ME). Todd Delano (MA) landed the hard luck award for not catching a single fish, legal or sub-legal. And he was sitting next to Lauren. I was wondering, after tonight's success rate, if she will take him out fishing with her again!

I received a very generous donation of $250.00 from Ken & Carolyn Erikson (ME) sponsoring me in the cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity event focusing on cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Thank so much, Ken & Carolyn. I very much appreciate the larger donation!

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the Roger Hopkins (RI) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing lightly out of the southeast and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. By 6:00 AM it had started raining lightly. The rain stopped at 7:00 AM and we became rain free until 11:30 AM when it started to rain again. The wind blew out of the southeast almost all morning before hauling out of the east at fifteen knots by 11:00 AM. The easterly wind blew up to twenty knots with higher gusts along the shore. The rain continued on into the day and part of the night, stopping by 9:00 PM. The visibility was not good along the shore. The highest air temperature I saw was 66F, in the morning. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 64F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 52F).

The wind was light out of the southeast on the ride to the fishing grounds. The ocean was calm to a one foot chops. As soon as they arrived, the wind started to freshen out of the southeast. The wind direction remained southeast for the trip. Wind speeds increased to twenty knots with some higher gusts. Seas increased to three and five foot chops by late in the morning. By later in the afternoon, seas had increased to four to six foot chops. It started raining at noon and continued to rain for the rest of the trip, on the ride back in and at the dock. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The tide (current) remained at a moderate value. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to three miles in fog, haze and precipitation. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.7F.

The fishing conditions were not the greatest. The larger than normal seas made it hard to hold bottom. And the same seas and weather state created more bouts of sea sickness than we usually see, particularly with this crew. Still, catching and landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock. This doesn't surprise me as pollock are considered a bottom to mid mid-range fish; you don't have to fish right on the bottom to catch them. Not so with the haddock. And, to no surprise with me, only six legal haddock were landed for the whole trip! Legal landings also included two cusk. Released fish included twenty market cod from 5 to 8 pounds, a handful of dogfish, a few sub-legal haddock and one wolfish. They anchored on every spot. No one used any bait today, all preferring to use jigs and flies.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. I do know that it wasn't Roger Hopkins this time! In fact, he didn't feel the greatest, although he never did let it show. Nor did he prove it by bending over the rail. We will just have to take his word on this. Roger's three best fish included a 12.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock. There was a tie for the boat pool for the largest fish with an 18 pounder, both pollock. Bill McLaughlin caught one while Steve Scardace caught the other. Steve also caught a 13 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Kevin Lynn.

Other Angler Highlights: Justin Grenier caught a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish. Ken Daloisio did one better with a 16 pound pollock. Kevin Durnning landed a 15 pound pollock. He also landed the hard luck award for being the highest of the hurlers today!

Roger Hopkins did me a solid today by donating $50.00 of his hard earned money to sponsor me in my cancer fund raising event called the Pan-Mass Challenge. Roger has supported me every year. Continuing to do so, cements my resolve to keep doing it year after year as I plan to do until I am unable. Thank you very much, Roger. All the best to you!

Labor Day, Monday, September 4, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Although, cool in the morning, the air temperature warmed up nicely in the early afternoon. By 2:00 PM, the air temperature had topped out at 79F, to my knowledge. The wind blew out of the west northwest later in the morning and then west in the afternoon. Wind speeds might have been ten knots, lighter than the wind on the fishing grounds today. The visibility was good. The sky was mostly clear with a few clouds.The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at fifteen knots in the morning and then hauled out of the southwest and dropped five knots. Seas were four to six feet chops during the morning and two to four feet after noon. A few anglers were under the weather with sea sickness, a common theme the last few days. The air temperature reached a high of 62F. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.6F.

The fishing conditions weren't the greatest. The seas were the main negative factor. But there were also a pile of dogfish. And a few were sea sick to boot. Still, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good. They could have been very good or better than that in better conditions. But anglers also caught some special fish including our first bluefin tuna since Jim Phelon (NH) landed one that weighed 176.5 pounds on June 8, 2010. And we tied our fourth largest pollock of the season with a 22 pounder caught in thirty fathoms of water! Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included the previously mentioned tuna weighing 110 pounds, four cusk, fourteen haddock and a whiting. Released fish included over ninety dogfish, thirty market cod from 5 to 8 pounds and twenty-one sub-legal haddock. Ian mixed drifting with anchoring, as the boating method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. It was a very busy day with catering to the sailing wounded, taking dogfish off hooks, weighing fish and trying to get everything else done. And there were really no standouts. I would have thought that Bernie Gage (VT) was it. And maybe he was. But no one counted fish.

On the last spot, just as they were getting ready to pack it in for the day, Justin Gage (VT), Bernie's son, hooked into something big. Ian wasn't sure what it was at first as the fish was hooked on top and stayed on top for the fight. As the fish got closer, it became obvious that Justin had a small bluefin tuna on his line. For less than a half an hour Justin fought the fish until he had the fish doing small circles around the stern of the boat. He closed the circles until the fish came within gaffing range. And that was it. The first bluefin boated on the Bunny Clark in seven years. And it's not like we haven't had our opportunities between 2010 and now. We don't have a scale big enough to accommodate a fish over 100 pounds. So they had to weigh the fish in pieces. The pieces came out to 110 pounds, a little less than if it had been weighed whole, unbled. Ian took a picture of Justin trying to hold the fish. This digital image appears on the right in this entry. He never did catch another fish of 10 pounds or better. And, what was most interesting to me, the tuna took the fly above the jig and was hooked in such a way as the teeth didn't chafe on the loop holding the fly! Justin gave me a piece of the center cut near the shoulder. Deb pan seared it with olive oil and sesame seeds this night. It was really out of this world. Thank you very much, Justin (and Bernie!).

Bernie Gage had the largest fish of the trip until his son upstaged him with his tuna. Bernie's fish was a 22 pound pollock, a tie for the fourth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season and the second largest fish of the trip. Bernie also caught a pollock that weighed 10 pounds. The third largest fish was a 16.5 pound pollock caught by John Russell (ME). He too caught a 10 pound pollock as well.

Other Angler Highlights: Paul Guenthner (MA) boated a 14 pound pollock, his largest fish. Autumn Dubel (NH) caught two nice pollock. One weighed 13 pounds. The other weighed 12 pounds. Ben Russell (VT) caught a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. Mark Dubel (NH) landed a 12 pound pollock. The high hurler today was Chris Dupree (NH). He was the first and the worst and landed the hard luck award for his condition and the way he handled it. Ouch!

Dawn Beckwith (ME) sponsored my Pan-Mass Challenge ride with a donation of $50.00 today. She is a peach and always there for support and good conversation at Barnacle Billy's restaurant. On Sundays, the Maine Coast Cycling Club usually rides past their house. I am usually with one of the groups who do this. That part of the road is so fast that I never stop to look to see where I am until I'm past it! Thanks so much for your support, Dawn. I appreciate it very much!

Tim Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I hosted the Larry Reed (ME) marathon trip charter today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good at least.

It was a choppy ride to the fishing grounds. The wind was out of the south southwest at a minimum of fifteen knots. Seas were chops of four feet and we were taking them on the starboard bow. Occasionally, we would hit a queer one and I would hear the anglers respond appropriately! The air temperature was mild. The visibility was good, at least.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at fifteen to twenty knots to start. Seas were four feet or more, large chops. The seas diminished during the day but the wind never backed off from fifteen knots. Instead of the four to five foot chops earlier, we had three foot chops later in the day. The seas, I am sure, were influenced by the tidal current. The air temperature reached a high of 65F in the shade. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was light in the morning to moderate in the afternoon. The sky was hazy clear with scattered clouds combined with high cirrus coverage. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59.5F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 88F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 61F).

The fishing conditions were not the greatest. Seas made it hard to hold bottom appropriately, there were quite a few dogfish but, worse, we had more than our fair share of sea sick anglers. Despite this, the catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Most pollock were 3 to 6 pounds but we had a fair number of good sized ones. Legal landings also included seventeen haddock and thirteen cusk. Released fish included twenty-three sub-legal haddock, sixty-five dogfish and eleven market cod to 10 pounds. We never attempted a drift, preferring to anchor on every stop. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Jim Morrell (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. I didn't count his fish but it was obvious. His three largest fish included a 12 pound pollock, a 12.25 pound pollock and a 12.75 pound pollock. Bryan Lucas (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 22.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest pollock of the fishing season to date. I took a picture of Bryan holding his prize. This digital image appears on the left. It's probably the worst picture I have taken this season! Bryan also caught the best double of the day. His double included a 16.25 pound pollock and a 12.25 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Jim Iams (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. Jim was also second hook. Some of his other good fish included a 16 pound pollock, a 12 pound pollock and a double that included an 11 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Larry Reed. I also weighed a 12.5 pound pollock for him. He caught the most haddock with a count of eight, more or less. He must also have a penchant for dogfish as he caught nearly every one I could see on the sounding machine plus others I didn't see!

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Jones (ME) landed a double that included a 10 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. He also caught another 10 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. Tracy Jodrey (ME) boated a 10.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Zach Farrington (ME) landed a 10 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. Rand Richards (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his best fish. Karolyn Bonney (ME) caught an 11 pound pollock and a 16 pound pollock, her two biggest fish. Boo Whitten (ME) had a variety of different sized pollock. Her three largest weighed 15.25 pounds, 11.5 pounds and 16.5 pounds. Matt Jacobs (ME) landed a 15 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jake Johnson (ME) landed the hardest luck of the trip award for being the most intolerant of the motion of the ocean. He never wetted a fishing line!

This is one of the most fun charters I take every year. It's almost like having a working vacation. And I do so look forward to seeing them all. So I really enjoyed their company. But they are also very generous when it comes to supporting my cancer research fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Today they sponsored my ride with a generous $240.00. I can't tell you how much I appreciate this. Mainly because it comes from every one of them, the best support of all. Thank you so very much for this support and generosity. Too bad I have to wait another year to see you all again! All the best to every one of you!

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was a balmy 66F, the sky was mostly cloudy, winds were light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good, at best, in haze. Ashore, we had no rain until 9:45 AM. And we had, really, no wind either. In fact, by 6:00 AM, the fog rolled in obscuring any chance of a glimpse at the ocean from the land. This lasted until 8:00 AM. The sky remained overcast for most of the day with a brief glimpse at the sun between 8:00 AM and 9:00 AM. The sky remained overcast for the rest of the day. The highest air temperature I saw during the day was 67F. That was in the morning. The wind was very light and variable after sunrise. After noon, the wind blew lightly out of the north northeast. The rain started after 9:45 AM. It seemed like a tropical downpour at times. We had thunder and lightning. Most of this rain came before noon. After noon, we had periods of hard rain but more periods of light rain. After 3:30 PM, the rain, when it fell, was light in nature. The visibility was fair to good most of the day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 68F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at seven to twelve knots in the morning and then, later in the morning, hauled out of the south southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to four feet. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile in fog to five miles in haze. They had thunder and lightning, something I have only seen two other times on the fishing grounds. And it rained most of the morning and part of the afternoon. The sky was mostly overcast. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.8F.

The fishing conditions were not great. They weren't bad but I would not say they were good. They didn't see the dogfish we saw the last two days. But the seas weren't the best and the tide was stronger than normal. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far, smaller than the last two days. Legal landings also included six cunners, one redfish, three cusk and fifteen haddock. Released fish included eight market cod to 7 pounds, twenty-seven sub-legal haddock and thirty-five dogfish. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked the same.

Catlin Fox (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish by far. His two best fish were a 10 pound pollock and a 12 pound pollock. The 12 pound pollock tied for the second largest fish of the trip. Ally Fuehrer (ME) tied with Catlin, also landing a 12 pound pollock. Alan Tothill (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Silver (NH) caught an 8 pound pollock, one of the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool. Mike Harr (OH), a Columbus Blue Jackets fan (as am I when not cheering for the Bruins - I just love Coach John Tortorella, a U. Maine grad.), landed a 9.5 pound pollock, one of the largest fish of the trip. Chris Smith (NY) was one of a couple of sea sick individuals today. In fact, only eight anglers were actively fishing. Chris was the "first and the worst". He landed the hard luck award for the trip.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it was pouring rain, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was fair in precipitation, fog and haze.

It was a smooth ride to the fishing grounds until I realized that we were traveling with the wind. The wind was out of the north. When it became light enough to see, seas were a couple of feet in chops over a five to six foot sea swell from the southeast. We carried rain with us all the way to the grounds, heavy to start, light upon arrival. The air temperature was 60F. The visibility was about five miles in haze.

On the grounds, it rained lightly for a short time and then stopped for the day. We never saw another drop. The sky stayed overcast for all but the last two hours of fishing. The sky stayed mostly clear after that. The wind stayed out of the north for an hour but hauled out of the west after that. Wind speeds were ten knots or more from both directions. The sea swells were the same as they were on the ride out. Sometime late morning, the wind hauled out of the west southwest and blew as much as fifteen knots. Seas were still about the same, maybe a little larger in the chops. The wind was ten knots out of the west southwest on the ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 64F in the shade. The visibility ranged from five to ten miles in haze to start but cleared to over thirty miles before noon. The tide (current) was moderate in the morning and strong in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.5F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 57F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing conditions were good overall. There were few dogfish, the seas weren't terrible and anglers could always hold bottom. The catching and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Most were in the 3 to 6 pound range. We did get a few bigger pollock but it wasn't like Tuesday's trip at all. Legal landings also included six haddock, eight cusk and a redfish. Released fish included fifteen sub-legal haddock, seven market cod from 5 to 13.75 pounds, a barndoor skate and fifteen dogfish. We anchored and drift fished. Mostly we stayed on anchor. We had our best success on the hook (anchor). Cod flies caught the most fish.

Roger LaVallee (VT) was high hook with the most legal fish. Bill Wallace (ME) was right behind him as second hook. In fact, had Bill not been so busy re-rigging, he might come up to Roger's level or even beaten him. But not today! Roger caught the third largest fish, a 13.75 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Bill Wallace's two largest fish were a 9.5 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock.

Mike Bruce (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish and won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish. His largest fish was a 21.5 pound barndoor skate, the third barndoor of the season and the second largest one caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. I took a picture of Mike with his skate just before releasing it. This digital image appears on the right. His second largest fish was a 21 pound pollock, a tie for the Bunny Clark's seventh largest pollock of the season so far.

Other Angler Highlights: I fished for a little while, catching and releasing a 13 pound cod. I kept a 3 pound pollock that I caught. I had a bigger one on but was slow enough reeling it up that a blue shark took it and got hooked in the process. Not knowing exactly what it was, I fought it from the stern to the bow until I could see that it was a blue shark. I broke the line, watching the jig in the corner of its mouth slide away with the shark! That was enough fishing for me for the day. Glen Rinkowski (SC) landed a 7.5 pound pollock, that I weighed. I believe he caught a larger one that I didn't weigh. And he caught a cusk that was about 8 pounds. Bill Wallace landed the hard luck award for losing four jigs. Ouch!

I was sponsored by two people today in my quest for a cancer free world with my involvement in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a charity cycling event that takes place every year the first Saturday of August. Bill Wallace was one for $25.00 and Dave Nickerson (ME) was another for a generous $100.00. Thank you both for your help and support. The ride, of course, is over but cancer never sleeps and neither does my fund raising to thwart it. Glad you are on my side!

Friday, September 8, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west at ten knots or more most of the morning, hauling out of the south in the afternoon. The sky was clear with some clouds except for a light rain shower around 5:00 PM that lasted several minutes but hardly made the roads damp. The highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit was 75F. The visibility was excellent all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 46F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at fifteen to ten knots, hauling out of the southwest at ten knots later in the trip. Seas were chops of a foot over a three foot sea swell. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The sky was sunny for the trip. The visibility ranged to thirty miles, more or less. The tide (current) was strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing conditions were good. This mainly because the current was so strong and the dogfish so populous. This created tangles which, without, would have improved on the conditions positively. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 3 to 5 pound category. There were a few bigger pollock mixed in. Legal landings also included thirty-seven haddock, one redfish, twenty-two cusk and a white hake. Released fish included twelve small market cod, twenty-eight sub-legal haddock and fifty-eight dogfish. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well but cod flies caught the most fish.

Norm Herrick (MA/ME) was high hook with eighteen legal fish. His largest fish was an 8.5 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. He also caught a 7 pound pollock, the first fish that Ian weighed. Alain Brault (QC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The third largest fish was an 8 pound pollock caught by David Hildebrandt (NY). Jim Rohen (MA) landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind was light and variable in direction. Not once was the wind strong enough to move a flag. The ocean along the shore was calm. The sky was mostly clear with clouds and much sun. The air temperature reached a high of 69F, that I saw, in Perkins Cove. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northeast at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to one and a half feet over rolling southeast sea swells of three feet, more or less, every eleven seconds. The air temperature reached a high of 63F. The tide was strong in the shallow water, less so in water over forty fathoms. The visibility was excellent. The sky was sunny with few clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60.5F.

The fishing conditions were very good. It could have been better had the current not been so strong in places. The catching was very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed pollock of a much better size than the last few days. Legal landings also included fourteen haddock, a white hake, two cusk and seven cunners. Released fish included six small market cod, four dogfish and twenty-three sub-legal haddock. Jared anchored and drift fished. Cod flies caught the most fish, by far!

I believe that Gardner Murphy (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. Zachary Ashley (ME) landed as many pounds of fillets but caught mostly pollock, while Gardner caught smaller fish (except for one) and haddock. Gardner's largest fish was a 12 pound pollock. Zachary didn't land a fish of 10 pounds or better. Really, it could have been either one. No fish were counted.

Parrish Manson (MS) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. Like the 21 pound pollock caught on Thursday's trip, this fish ties the seventh largest pollock caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. Parrish also caught a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish of the trip was a 17.25 pound pollock caught by Wayne Booker (ME). Wayne also caught a 14 pound pollock. Dan Russell (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Rebecca Hammer (NH) landed an 11.5 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock, her largest two fish. Calvin Pratt (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer.

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was cloudless (again), the wind was light from the north and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the north northeast at ten knots, tops, and then started to die out. By early afternoon, we had no wind along the shore and the ocean was calm. The sky was clear, with some clouds, all day except for brief shower that was light and lasted a few minutes during the mid afternoon. That was the only shower of the day. The sky cleared after that. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 71F. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 44F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The wind died all morning, dropping to five knots by noon. The ocean was calm for most of the afternoon. Ian didn't record an air temperature. I can only imagine that it was cooler than it has been. The tide (current) was strong. The visibility was excellent. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing conditions were good to start. No better or worse. The current and the seas were factors to begin. There were very few dogfish. Later, the fishing conditions improved to very good in the calm weather. The catching was very good as were the landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock in the 5 pound class (more or less). There were only a few pollock in the 9 to 10 pound range. Legal landings also included twenty-four haddock, three cusk and a white hake. Released fish included fifteen market cod to 13.25 pounds, thirty-six haddock and three dogfish. Drifting was the method used for the trip. Jigs and cod flies, mostly cod flies, caught the most fish.

John Lambert (NY) was high hook with the most legal. He lost count. Former deck hand and excellent fisherman, Sean Devich (NH), caught (and released, of course) the largest fish of the trip, a 13.25 pound cod. His good friend, Dom Bruno (NY), won the boat pool for the largest fish with the second largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Sean was not in the boat pool. Dom also caught the third largest fish of the trip, an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: George Johnson (NY) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, the first fish to be weighed for the boat pool. His largest cod weighed 10 pounds. Rick Baker (NY) caught a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jeff Williams (NY) landed a 10.5 pound pollock. Ray Lambert (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing the most jigs of the trip, two!

Monday, September 11, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was cloudless (yet again), the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots along the shore and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest for a couple of hours after dawn. At about 10:00 AM, the wind hauled more west northwest. Wind speeds were light later in the morning. The ocean along the shore was calm. There was no wind all afternoon. The air temperature had reached 80F by 2:00 PM. If the air temperature was any higher, I did not see it (or feel it). The sky remained with fewer clouds than the last few days. But it was humid. And that humidity seemed to dull the sharpness of clarity around the edges of the sky closer to the horizon. This gave us a milky lighting effect on the day with a bright sun when it was over head. The visibility was good at best in haze with the threat of fog that never came. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 49F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north northwest at fifteen to ten knots to start. Seas were chops of two to three feet. Later in the morning, the wind, out of the same direction, started dropping. Wind speeds were ten to five knots in the afternoon with seas of two to one foot. It was a very comfortable ride home with the drop in seas. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The sky was sunny and hazy. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing conditions, the catching and landings were very good today, both in numbers and in the size of the fish. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included fifty-three haddock, ten cusk and a white hake. Released fish included twenty-six market cod to 12.5 pounds, one barndoor skate, fifty-four sub-legal haddock, and eighteen dogfish. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

High hook could not be determined today. Dick Lyle (NY) could easily have been high hook had he fished with a cod fly. He didn't. He stayed with a bare jig all day. He still ended up landing six legal haddock, quite a few pollock and (I think he told me) seven market cod. Dick's largest fish was a 10 pound pollock. Serghie Rojco (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound barndoor skate. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest barndoor skate of the fishing season to date. We have seen a total of four this season so far. Captain Ian took a picture of his big skate with Serghie holding it. This digital image appears on the left. This fish was released alive. Serghie also caught a pollock that weighed 15 pounds. The second largest fish was an 18.5 pound pollock caught by Mike Benjamin (VT). Dana Kendall (VT) and Jim Howard (MA) tied for third place each with fish weighing 17 pounds. Both fish were pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Todd Benjamin (VT) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 12.5 pound cod. Released, of course. His largest fish of the trip was a 15.5 pound pollock. Jeff Corey (MA) landed a 15 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jason Kiczo (MA) caught a 16.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Brian Waskiewicz (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock, his only fish over 10 pounds. Phil Bacon (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip.

My sister, Meg, God love her, donated $1,000.00 today to my cancer fund raising cycling involvement with the Pan-Mass Challenge in loving memory of our dear friend Emil Masi (ME), who passed away from cancer just a few days ago. He was a wonderful person. Called me "T" all the time. One of the people who made this earth better just by being on it. Thank you, Meg. A very nice thing you do. And, of course, I appreciate it very much. Somewhere someone will benefit by this gift and they will never know the good person behind the generosity. Thanks again!

Tim Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear with a half moon (not quite) over head, there was no wind to speak of and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least.

It was flat glassy calm when the Bunny Clark left the gate of Perkins Cove behind. And the ocean was flat calm all the way to the fishing grounds. The sky was clear, the air temperature was mild and the visibility was excellent. It was a very enjoyable ride for everyone - including Ian, who was rigging up jigging sticks for every angler!

The ocean was flat calm when we first arrived on the fishing grounds. There was barely a wind ripple on the surface. After less than an hour we saw wind ripples out of the northwest. That was all the wind we got for the next two hours. The wind was blowing out of the west when I checked the direction before noon. Wind speeds, at most, were three knots. The ocean remained calm. The wind had hauled out of the southwest by the time we started to head back in. Eighteen miles from home, the southwest wind was blowing about eight knots, the seas just turning over a one foot chop. That was the roughest we saw the ocean all day! The air temperature reached a high of 65.8F in the shade. The visibility ranged over thirty miles. The tide (current) was moderate to strong in places, depending. We hardly saw a cloud in the sky all day, the sun brilliant in a very clear blue sky. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.1F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 50F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing conditions were very good overall, as was the catching and landings. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. In fact, everywhere we went we found pollock. There were very few smaller pollock today, enough so that I didn't weigh every pollock over 10 pounds. Several were caught that didn't go on the scale. The same was true of the cod where I released at least five cod over 10 pounds. Legal landings also included ten haddock, fifteen cusk, ten redfish, two whiting and a butter mullet. Released fish included twelve sub-legal haddock, exactly fifty cod from 5 pounds to 15.5 pounds, a larger than normal wolffish and two dogfish. Yes, that's right, only two dogfish! We drift fished for most of the fishing, anchoring only twice. The drifting was much more productive.

Corey "The New Guy" McGrath (MA) was high hook with the most legal fish. His count was over twenty legal. His largest pollock weighed 13 pounds. And he caught the largest cod of the trip at 15.5 pounds. And, he landed the hard luck award for losing the most jigs with a count of three! He was no Bill Wallace in the "losing jigs department" but he was on his way when the fishing ended!

Ben Barzousky (MA) won the Club pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21.25 pound pollock. This is the seventh largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Ben also caught over ten market cod to 12 pounds. A couple other fish that I weighed of his included an 11.25 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. George "The Tangler" Sweet (MA) won the Club pool for the second largest fish with the second fish, a 21 pound pollock. He would have caught more big fish had he not been so involved with the lines of other anglers! George's 21 pound pollock is tied for the eighth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Gerald Garner (MA) won the Club pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 20.1 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Marko (MA) caught the first fish I could weigh, a 12.25 pound pollock. His largest fish was a 14 pound pollock. Bill Bolotin (MA) caught the largest and the only wolffish of the trip. It weighed 12.25 pounds, the third largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Bill's largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds. Todd Krutiak (MA) caught the earliest big fish of the trip, a 20 pound pollock. I took a picture of Todd holding his pollock up with the sun rising in the background. This digital image appears on the right. We caught the bigger pollock much later in the day. I weighed a few fish for Bill Lewis (MA). These fish included a 10 pound pollock, a 14 pound pollock, an 11 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. Mike Kruszyna (MA) landed a 15.25 pound pollock and a 12.25 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Gloria Gennari (MA) boated a 14 pound pollock and a 12.25 pound pollock, her two best fish. Dick Carpenter (MA) caught his biggest fish as the last fish of the trip. It was a pollock weighing 16.5 pounds. Two other pollock of Dick's that I weighed included a 10.25 pounder and a 10.75 pounder. Jody Goff (MA) landed a 14 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jim Therrien (VT) caught a 10 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound pollock. Hank Bartlett (MA) landed a 15.25 pound pollock, his best. Rick Gurney (MA) released a 10 pound cod and caught an 11 pound pollock, his two best. Rick was second hook today. Al Hanson (MA) boated a double that included an 8 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time.

I was sponsored by several people today, supporting my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a 292 mile charity cycling event that started at 5:30 AM on Saturday, August 5, 2017 and ended at 11:00 AM on Sunday, August 6, 2017. My fund raising goes on until December 30th every year. I have been part of this event for eleven years now and have raised close to $280,000.00, more or less. Today's donors and their donations are as follows: Gloria Gennari for $50.00, Al & Dawn Hanson for a slightly more generous $66.00, Jody Goff for $10.00 and Mike Kruszyna for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your support. Many of you help me out every season. I certainly appreciate that!

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the annual Tom Bruyere & The St. Lawrence River Rats (all New York, unless otherwise noted) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear with a half moon over head, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm and the visibility over it seemed excellent. Ashore, it was a wonderful calm day with very light northwest winds, no wind and then light, very light, southwest winds in the afternoon. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The visibility was very good. The air temperature topped out at 78F, to my knowledge, in Perkins Cove. The sky was sunny with some high cirrus clouds all day. It was like a warm summer day. Beautiful. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 48F).

On the fishing grounds, it couldn't have been nicer weather. The wind blew out of the northwest at five knots, died out to nothing and then hauled out of the southwest at five knots. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high of 67F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The water temperature reached a high of 61F.

The fishing conditions were excellent, the catching was nearly excellent and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. On average, they were smaller but there were a lot more of them (than yesterday's trip). Legal landings also included twenty-nine haddock, four redfish, six cusk, two mackerel and one monkfish. Released fish included eighty-one cod from 7 pounds to 17 pounds, forty-eight sub-legal haddock and not a single dogfish or blue shark. Drifting was the method. Everyone used jigs and cod flies. No bait.

Bob Mathews (FL) was high hook with the most legal fish. He was very quiet today. Remarkably so. In fact, I didn't even notice he was on the boat this morning. Unlike him. Rich Mallott won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 17 pound cod caught by Tom "Ollie" Bruyere. Ollie caught this cod as part of a double catch that also included an 11 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cod double of the season to date. Third place was shared with three anglers, all cod and all exactly 14 pounds. Mike Kotash caught one, Tiernan Smith caught one and Kim Demers caught one. Tiernan also caught cod that weighed 12 pounds and 13 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Sovie caught a 10 pound pollock and a 12 pound cod, his two biggest fish. Andy Bruyere caught a 13.5 pound cod, his biggest fish. John Gardner boated a 10 pound pollock. His largest fish was an 11.5 pound cod. Lee Sovie caught a 12 pound cod, his best. Kenny Morrow caught an 11 pound cod. Warren Putman caught an 11 pound cod. John Beaudoin caught a double that included two cod of 10 pounds each. His largest fish was a 13 pound cod. Bob Williams landed a 10 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jerry Olmstead caught an 11.5 pound cod, his biggest fish. He also landed the hard luck award for being held responsible for the worst tangle of the day! Jerry, Jerry, Jerry!

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was partly cloudy (it had been raining an hour earlier) with a partial moon over the eastern horizon, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least.

Another calm ride to the fishing grounds was had by all aboard the Bunny Clark. Winds were light out of the south. The ocean was smooth with a long period swell of four to six feet that was hardly noticeable. In fact, I didn't notice it until I looked at the sounding machine. The visibility was very good at least, the air temperature was mild and the sky was mostly clear with a crescent moon over my left shoulder.

On the fishing grounds, the wind was very light from the south over the same long period ocean swell we had on the way out. We enjoyed this wind and sea state for a couple of hours. Mid morning, the wind increased from the south. But it never blew over seven or eight knots. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest and, eventually, blew up to about ten knots with a one foot chop. We carried the same sea state and wind for the whole ride back to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 68F in the shade. The visibility ranged to just over twenty miles. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was partly cloudy with three varieties of cloud formations including the high cirrus clouds. This gave us soft lighting for the day, great for taking pictures of anglers with fish! The surface water temperature reached a high of 61.3F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 59F).

The fishing conditions were excellent. I don't think they could have been much better. We had very little current, even in the deep water, a smooth ocean surface, warm temperatures and no dogfish. The catching and landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were pollock. But we also found a new spot to catch hake which I was very pleased with. It couldn't have come at a better time. And this spot had quite a few nice cusk on it as well. White hake was the second most prevalent legal species caught today. Legal landings also included nineteen haddock, three redfish, ten cusk, two butter mullet and one small whiting. Released fish included eighteen market cod from 5 to 8 pounds, two dogfish and sixteen sub-legal haddock. We lost one pollock to a blue shark. We saw no other blue sharks today. We drift fished in the morning and anchored and drift fished in the afternoon. All terminal gear worked well but bait and cod flies caught the most fish overall.

High hook status either went to Rich Gargan (NY) or Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA). They were pretty even. Rich walked off the boat with more fish but Griff released quite a few legal pollock. Either way, both were "right on" all day long. Rich fished in the tip of the bow pulpit while Griff fished next to Ray Westermann (MA) in the waist of the cockpit on the starboard side. Some of Rich's good fish included an 18 pound white hake and a 14 pound Maine state trophy cusk - plus a lot of small medium pollock! Griff caught the most counters of the day including a 17.5 pound white hake, a 19 pound white hake and a 24.5 pound white hake. He also caught a double that included a 14.25 pound white hake and a 20 pound white hake, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Griff's double is the third largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far.

Ben Austin (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 34 pound Maine state trophy white hake. This is his first hake, the only hake he has ever caught and the only hake he did catch today. We were just starting to lose the fish when he came up with that one. He caught quite a few small medium pollock. Ray Westermann won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 32 pound Maine state trophy white hake. I took a picture of Ray with his big hake, one of the first hake aboard today. This digital image appears on the left in this entry. Ray caught two other notable fish. One was a 15 pound Maine state trophy cusk. The other was a 22 pound white hake. Erik Grove (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 27 pound Maine state trophy white hake.

Other Angler Highlights: Stefan James (VT) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and a 13.5 pound pollock, his two largest fish. Mike Stump (MA) caught a 19 pound white hake and a 21 pound white hake. Bill Otto (PA) landed a 16 pound white hake and a 24 pound white hake. Wobbie Barnes (MA) caught three hake all about the same size. Two weighed 14.75 pounds exactly while another weighed 15 pounds. Mark Randis (PA) boated a 22.5 pound white hake and a 22 pound white hake, his two biggest fish. Rick Fisher (VT) caught a 16 pound white hake. Patrick Chickering (VT) landed a hake just a quarter of a pound shy of a Maine state trophy at 24.75 pounds. Matt S. Moser (TX) lost one of the biggest hake of the day on the surface. I couldn't retrieve it because I would have had to have everyone reel up, ruining the best drift of the day. We looked for it after but never found it. Matt's son, nine year old Matt P. Moser (TX), landed a 14 pound white hake, his largest fish of the trip. Both Matts were on an afternoon trip with us earlier. Afternoon trips certainly aren't as successful as a marathon trip. Both caught many small medium pollock. They may not ever want to go on a half day trip again! Ed Werner (PA) long time Bunny Clark angler landed the hard luck award t-shirt for having his worst Bunny Clark trip of all time. You have to understand that Ed's bad trip is another angler's great one! In fact, some of his fish included the largest pollock of the day at 15 pounds, a 10 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound cusk and a 16.75 pound white hake. Had he not been so tangled all the time, he most certainly would have become the great angler that I have come to know and love over the years!

I had a mishap that almost put me down and out. Needless to say I am very sore as I write. I went to jump on the canopy top from the trunk house to clean up some blood from the pollock they were catching on the bow. I launched myself up on a railing, hit my head on the open radar array and fell backwards, missing my head but landing my left side on the edge of the trunk house, eight feet below, hitting my wrist, my right ankle and the upper part of my leg. I was sore for rest of the trip. I was supposed to be (road bike) racing in the "Senior Games" on Sunday. But that puts me out of the race for sure. Probably just as well. Lucky I didn't do more damage. Just a few bruised ribs, a swollen ankle and a tweaked wrist.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 68F, the sky was mostly cloudy with a crescent moon hanging high over the eastern horizon, the wind was light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. Ashore, it was a beautiful sunny day after daybreak. This warm weather, mostly sunny skies and light winds lasted all morning. There was a fog bank hanging just off shore starting at 8:00 AM. We really didn't see any fog along the shore in the morning. By noon, we were starting to see more cloud cover. It started to rain just after 2:00 PM. The rain lasted an hour or so and was light. It had stopped completely by 4:00 PM but was replaced by fog. We had foggy conditions but not so wet for the rest of the afternoon into the night. The wind remained light all day from the south or southeast and the air temperature reached a high of 75F in Perkins Cove. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 72F (with a low of 62F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest but only barely. Wind speeds ranged from one to five knots. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 74F in the shade of the canopy top. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) remained moderate throughout the day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to a mile in fog/haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing conditions, for anglers, was nearly excellent. It would have been excellent except for the thirty-eight dogfish that had to be thrown back. The catching was nearly excellent as well, if you also include the dogfish. Landings were good to very good. The bigger fish were not really on the bite today, Ian said. But they did get a few good sized cod. Most legal fish landed were pollock. But they also caught forty legal haddock, which is more than the Bunny Clark has seen for a few trips. Legal landings also included nine cunners, a whiting, three redfish, twenty cusk, eight mackerel and a butter mullet. Released fish included sixteen market cod to 17 pounds, one hundred and sixty-one sub-legal haddock and two wolffish. Drifting was the only method available. Cod flies caught the most fish today, by far.

Either Dan Kelley (ME), Ray Westermann (MA) or Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) were high hook today with the most legal fish. They were all pretty close. Dan counted his fish. He had seventeen legal. Dan's largest fish was a 14 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Neither Ray nor Griff caught a fish of 10 pounds or better - to my knowledge.

Eric Cooper (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 16 pound pollock caught by Dave Shay (NY). Doug Raymond (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 14.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Jeff Corey (MA) caught a 13 pound pollock, his best fish. John Teehan (MA) caught two pollock of exactly 11 pounds each. Ray Hutchinson (ME) also caught an 11 pound pollock. Eric Bretton (ME) too, caught an 11 pound pollock. Dave Shay (NY) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

I received two donations sponsoring my cancer fund raising habit with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Steve Fortier (ME) was one with a generous donation of $50.00. Joe Bradley (ME) was another angler with a gift. His donation was $25.00. Thank you both very much for your support and consideration. It means a lot to me and, obviously, stopping cancer means much to you as well. All the best to you both!

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Captain Micah Tower ran the full day trip today. Anthony Palumbo was unable to work the trip today so my best son, Micah, agreed to do the trip in his place.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly cloudy or overcast, the roads were wet from either an earlier rain or from the mist and fog, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. Ashore, the fog lasted most of the morning along the shore. It was worst at 10:00 AM. Afterward, the fog was spotty, moving in and out with no apparent theme. The sky remained overcast all morning. By 2:00 PM, the sun came out and stayed out for the rest of the day. There was some cloudiness but not enough to mar the pleasantness or warmth of the sun. It was humid. The air temperature reached a high, that I saw, of 75F in Perkins Cove. The visibility never really got good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 80F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind was light out of the southwest (five knots or less) and it was foggy all day. A quarter of a mile was the best they had for visibility. The ocean was calm. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. It seemed overcast but that might have just been the fog. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62.5F.

The fishing conditions were excellent. There wasn't much tide, there were no dogfish and the weather/sea conditions were very comfortable. The catching was very good. I would call the landings the same, very good. They caught quite a few cod that prevented them from landing more fish that could be kept. But the cod were the biggest fish of the trip today. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included thirty-eight haddock, four cusk, seven redfish, two white hake and one monkfish. Released fish included twenty sub-legal haddock, twelve sub-legal redfish, a handful of sub-legal pollock and thirty-five cod from 6 to 16.5 pounds. Drifting was the only boating method available. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Brian Murphy (NH) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish, plus market cod, and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish of the trip, a 16.5 pound cod. He caught the cod as part of a double catch that also included a 10 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. That was the biggest double of the day. And if not for the big hake double that Jon Griffin (MA) caught on the marathon trip, it would have been the largest double of the last two weeks. As far as pools go, this is the third pool for the largest fish he has he has won in as many trips, three pools in a row. Brian also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 14 pound cod. And he caught an 11 pound cod as well. Marian Murphy, his better half, also fished today but I neglected to ask her how she did! I like to know because they are a remarkable fishing team. So my loss. Or the public's loss, as I would have written about it here. They are also singer song writers of a high degree; I love their music. If you follow this link: Murphy-Clark Band: "Another Hit" it will bring you to one of their current songs. There are others you can watch at this same YouTube site. In the video from the link, Brian is the lead vocalist while Marian plays the mandolin to his right. The guitar/vocalist between them is Gardner Murphy, Brian's brother (who was on the Bunny Clark last Saturday), while the woman on the end is Cindy, their sister. And they have a kick ass violinist whom I have never met but who is really something else (excellent). Anyway, check it out. These people are very good at what they do, whatever they do! And it's always a pleasure to have them aboard "the Bunny", as they call it.

The third largest fish was shared by three anglers, all at 13 pounds each and every one a cod! Tim Hazelwood (ME) caught one (as well as a 12 pound cod), Kevin Oliver (NY) caught one and Dan Littlefield (NY) caught one.

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Otto (PA) caught a 9 pound monkfish. This is the second largest goosefish that has been caught on the Bunny Clark this season to date. The largest, so far, is 24 pounds. And 24 pounds is not considered a very big one. Although trophy size in the state of Maine is 20 pounds or greater. Jonathan Claudius (ME) caught a 9.5 pound cod, his largest fish. Jim Davis (NY) caught an 11 pound cod and landed a 10 pound pollock. Milos Misic (ME) landed the hard luck award for being a bit under the weather. I don't know what he would have done had it been rough. However, the fog can tend to make one's equilibrium advance in that direction!

Sunday, September 17, 2017

The First Day of Haddock Prohibition.

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky appeared overcast, the roads were damp, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. Ashore, the roads were dry by 8:00 AM. The fog remained thick along the shore. But you could tell that, above the fog, the sky was clear. We had the fog all morning and into the afternoon. Around 2:00 PM, the fog receded back to the ocean and allowed the sun to come out in Perkins Cove. The sky stayed mostly sunny until 6:00 PM, when the fog waltzed right back into Perkins Cove. It was misty, foggy and dreary for the rest of the night. The highest air temperature I saw was 71F. The wind blew out of the southeast at almost ten knots in the afternoon, completely dying after 5:00 PM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the fog was black thick, never more than a quarter of a mile visibility but, mostly, less. The wind was very light and variable. The ocean was flat calm for most of the morning with a three to four foot long rolling sea swell coming from the southeast in the afternoon. The air temperature reached a high of 66F. The tide (current) was moderate to strong in places. The sky appeared overcast but it was probably the fog as it was sunny inland today. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing conditions were very good. They could have been excellent had it not been for the larger number of dogfish caught and the strong current in specific places. And it was almost too calm to drift. The catching was very good. Landings were good as we can't keep haddock now and cod have been off the table (the fillet table) all season. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included three redfish, four cusk, four cunners, a mackerel and three white hake. Released fish included twelve market cod from 5 to 12 pounds, sixty-five haddock and seventy-six dogfish. They drift fished all day. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish.

Jaden George (CA) caught the largest fish today, a 16.5 pound pollock. Jaden, however, was not entered in the boat pool. Jerry Cooper (VT) won the boat for the largest fish with the second largest fish, a 12 pound cod. The third and fourth largest fish were both caught by Mark Weldon (NH). The fish were a 9.5 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. Daniel Vitalis (ME) landed the hard luck award for losing a small mako shark just out of reach. I didn't talk to Ian about this but it was probably too small to keep. Had Ian been able to "tail it", it might have won the boat pool and, then, would have been released. I'm assuming that this was Ian's thinking.

I received another very generous $500.00 gift sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising cycling event called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donation was from Betsy McLaughlin (NY) who has supported me in this event for many years. I know I thanked you last night but I really do appreciate your help. It means a great deal to me. Thank you!

Monday, September 18, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston are running the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky appeared overcast, the roads were damp, it was misty/drizzly, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in dense fog, so thick you could cut it with a knife. Ashore, the fog stayed with us in Perkins Cove for most of the day. We had a break around 2:00 PM when the fog backed away from the shore for a couple of hours. After that, though, the fog was right back in again. There was very little wind today. What wind we did have was blowing from the southeast. The sky was overcast and it was damp with a misting we haven't seen in quite a long time. It was damp all day. I never saw a temperature reading over 66F. The visibility was poor, of course, in the fog. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 59F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 68F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at five knots or so to begin and then hauled out of the east southeast at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot or so near the end of the day, calm all day before that. There was an underlying sea swell of three to four feet, long period from the southeast. The air temperature reached a high of 65F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to three miles in fog/haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing conditions were good to very good. The conditions could have been better had there not been so many dogfish around. The catching was very good to excellent (including the dogs). Landings were very good, so much better than yesterday. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included two cusk and twenty-four redfish. Released fish included eighty-five haddock, twenty market cod from 5 to 10 pounds and over one hundred and fifty dogfish. Drifting was the method. Jigs and cod flies caught the lions share of the fish.

Norm Herrick (MA) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish. And he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish, an 11.5 pound pollock. For all intents and purposes, it was a tie for the two biggest fish. Norm also tied for the fourth largest fish with a 10 pound cod, the largest cod of the trip. It was a good day to be Norm Herrick! Wayne Gendron (NY) landed the third largest fish, a 10.5 pound pollock. Wayne also caught a 10 pound cod, like Norm.

Other Angler Highlights: Seth Greenwood (NY) landed a 10 pound pollock, his largest fish. Tippy Tilton (VT) landed the hard luck award for losing two jigs.

Seth Greenwood did me a solid today by donating $10.00 to help sponsor me in my Pan-Mass Challenge cycling event to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Thanks very much, Seth. I appreciate your help!

Not so Tim Tuesday, September 19, 2017

I was supposed to be running the marathon trip with Captain Ian Keniston today. The weather forecast and the advent of Hurricane Jos changed my mind. So the wooden anchors are out today, Wednesday and, possibly, Thursday's marathon trip. Stay tuned.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. The wind blew up to twenty knots along the shore, backed off, breezed up and backed off. At 2:30 PM, we had rain bands sweep over Perkins Cove. We had had not a drop of rain until then. It had been misty since noon. The rain bands came at intermittent intervals, dry and misty for a few minutes, rain for a few minutes. This kept up on into the night. I don't believe the wind ever got higher than twenty knots along the shore. I'm sure it was stronger the further offshore one traveled. The air temperature reached a high of 65F at the house. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 66F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 63F).

Two days after I fell off the canopy top of the Bunny Clark (while anchored during a marathon trip), I jumped on the bike for sixteen miles. Not a good idea. I had a much worse sleep that night and had momentary pain so strong (just after I got off the bike) that I thought I would either hurl or pass out. And I was wondering what would take place first. But, drawing my knees up to my chest staved off the pain and, with only one more temporary bout later, that ended. The rib pain remains. And sleeping is a bummer. I roll around when I sleep. Now when I roll I wake right up. I've been trying to learn to sleep on my back. That has been tough. Needless to say, I have been relying on naps when I can get them. Today I tried the bike again for twenty-five miles. I had much better results this time. It's too painful to get on the pedals out of the saddle. But sitting is fine. This time it had the effect of stretching muscles. And I felt much better when I got off the bike than I did before I got on it. Nothing changes the rib soreness; I'll be dealing with that for a while. But I can kind of get back to a little of what I was doing before. However, core exercises are completely out. Push ups, planks, situps, crunches, rowing, etc. are completely out. Way too sore to do any of that. And, of course, coughing, sneezing, yawning and laughing are very painful and will remain painful for a while. I'm sure it won't be as long as the recovery time experienced with broken ribs (twice before) but, right now, they feel almost the same.

I spent the day today catching up on desk work, tying storm lines off on the boats in the Cove and working at Barnacle Billy's. It wasn't very busy at the restaurant. But it was busy enough. And there were plenty of regular patrons to talk to.

My other problem is Gill. I have been sleeping later lately, getting up at 4:00 AM instead of 3:00. However, if I stay in bed any longer, Gill, our border collie, jumps on the bed and attacks. It's been a game I have been playing with him for a few years. I ask him; "where have you been?", tell him I've missed him and tell him what a good boy he is - all the while scratching his back vigorously and rubbing his belly. That was all well and good when I wasn't sore all over. Now I dread staying in bed longer than 3:00 AM. I sleep on the left side of the bed (as you look from the foot) which means that the right side (the Gill side) is exposed as is the left side of my body, the bruised side. This morning was the worst. I probably could have asked Deb to close the door to the bedroom. But that wouldn't have worked because Gill would have whinned until it was open. Gill launched himself on to the bed and on to me. It was painful. But I don't want to send the message to the dog that, now, it's not good to jump on the bed. So I try to do the same thing I have been doing with the dog, not quite as effectively but also trying not to show the dog I'm in pain with him lying right on top of me. Oh, I know I could have done more damage to myself. This I am well aware of. And I could have a much bigger life threatening problem. I feel lucky. So I will endure a little pain during the small amount of time to get to be with the dog.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Today was supposed to be an extreme day trip hosted by Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston. Alas, the current track of Jos has us on the ropes for the next couple of days. We won't be sailing today or on the marathon trip tomorrow. Not only will the winds be strong and the seas high, but the current, I'm sure, will be running a river. A better day can be had having a hot boiled lobster at Barnacle Billy's restaurant with a rum punch!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen plus knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to poor in fog, mist and haze. More later.

Starting this week we many fishing places available for future fishing trips on the Bunny Clark. These trips/dates include: There are fourteen spots on the Friday, September 22, extreme day trip, the full day trip on Saturday, September 23, has four fishing spots available, the extreme day trip on Monday, September 25, has seventeen fishing spots available, there are thirteen fishing spots available on the Tim Tuesday, marathon trip of September 26 and the extreme day trip of Wednesday, September 27, has all twenty fishing places available. Be there or be square! Fall is usually the best time for more and larger fish off the Maine coast. You can call 207-646-2214 to secure a reservation for any fishing date. Hope to see you there!









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