www.bunnyclark.com

Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Sunday, February 17, 2019, 4:00 PM EST



Perkins Cove's First Good Snowstorm of the Winter of 2018/2019

The shot above is a digital image I took from my iPhone off the footbridge of Perkins Cove looking to the northwest at 9:30 AM on January 20, 2019. We have had minor snow storms this winter but this is the largest one so far. We received about ten inches of snow in a storm that partially came from the south and partially came from the Ohio River Valley. Had things moved differently, it could have been a rain event. It's definitely winter now!




Tuesday, January 22, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 2F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at twenty-five knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in sea smoke. The wind was more the salient feature in today's weather. The temperature was low to start, for sure. But the air temperature increased to higher levels today than what could have been imagined yesterday. It was already 14F by 10:00 AM. By 1:00 PM, I saw a temperature value of 24F. That was the highest air temperature that I saw today. The wind, too, wasn't as hard as it was yesterday. It started off that way with winds out of the northwest with gusts to thirty knots. By sunrise, the wind had dropped to twenty knots sustained and with a lilt out of the west. By noon, the wind had dropped to fifteen and twenty knots out of the west northwest. The wind was only blowing at ten knots by 7:00 PM. The sky was clear all day. In fact, the sky was cloudless every time I looked outside today. The visibility was excellent by 10:00 AM. The sea smoke as gone by then as well. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 28F with a low of 7F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 22F (with a low of 1F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 23F (with a low of 1F).

I spent most of my day at the computer. The first part was, of course, editing this page. The rest of the time was spent working on the Guestletter. By 2:15 PM, I was at my mother's house. She had a cardiologist's appointment at 3:00 PM in Wells. It was a painless visit with good results. And that was good for both of us. I was back by 4:30 PM. At 5:45 PM, I attended a selectman's meeting where our liquor license and entertainment license was up for review again for both Barnacle Billy's and Barnacle Billy's, Etc. restaurants. I had to go to the podium to acknowledge that I was there representing both restaurants. There were no questions and approval was granted without a problem.

I received a third donation today, so far this year, sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile cycling event to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. This year the money will go directly for cancer research alone, genetic engineering specifically with a keynote on children. I have joined a team called Precision for Kids focusing on a specific "precision" technology where the teams money is pooled and used in this one area of research. I'm very excited to be a part of this. The donation came from Rich & Donna McGuiness (GA) who have been very very supportive in this project with me. Their commitment is such that they will not let me fail. Not their words but close enough! They have been very supportive of me for years. Thank you so much, Rich & Donna. I very much appreciate you support and drive!

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 12F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean appeared to be good. Today's air temperature were milder with the freezing mark broached before noon and the high air temperature, that I saw, at 43F. After all that cold those higher air temperatures would have reminded me of spring had there not been so much snow on the ground! The wind blew out of the southwest all day. Wind speeds were around the fifteen knot range at sunrise and as much as thirty knots, according to the buoy reports, a few miles offshore. We had sustained twenty knot southwest winds at sunset with higher gusts. And this went on through the night. It never rained, that I saw. The visibility was good to very good in haze, on the good side when the air temperature was the warmest. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 48F with a low of 20F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 39F (with a low of 11F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 41F (with a low of 11F).

It was a very busy day for me today. After posting this update, I started working on the Guestletter. I ended up getting it to the sixty percent mark. During the time I was working on that, I was in communication with Micah who was working on the Bunny Clark's hydraulic hauler. After a couple of calls to Coastal Hydraulics and talking with Micah, he brought the reservoir and the motor to them in Seabrook, New Hampshire. Coastal Hydraulics is the best. At the same time, I was working (on the phone) with our plumber with running a sprinkler system and changing out the grease trap at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. I was also talking with my sister, Cathy, on office issues at the restaurant and my sister, Meg, on Mom issues (making things more comfortable).

After lunch, I went to the office at Barnacle Billy's, Etc. to work on building the reservation book. However, once there, I realized that we had web cam issues and POS (point of sale - computer) issues as well. So I spent more time trouble shooting than I did getting the reservation book ready. Plus, I was working with a number of parties who wanted to secure our function room for future events at the restaurant. But I did get the reservation book started. I was also in communication with the company we will probably be pairing up with so we can take credit card reservations for the fishing boat over the phone. This is in the primary stages. So I won't know if we will really be going with this company or not. The idea is great but we haven't got into enough to peruse the practical aspects of it.

By 5:30 PM, I was pooched and frustrated to some degree. With dinner looming and my patience gone, I called it a night. I had started work this morning just after 3:00 AM, so I was done.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 43F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean appeared to be good. The earlier part of the daylight morning was drizzling rain. A steady rain started around late morning and continued, hard at times, through the afternoon. By 5:00 PM, the rain was starting to abate. The wind hauled out of the south at 8 or 9 AM and remained at fifteen to twenty knots. By noon, the southerly wind had increased to twenty-five with higher gusts. We saw the strongest winds at sunset with gusts up to almost forty knots. By 6:30 PM, the wind had hauled out of the west a thirty knots. The wind remained out of the west at decreased speed on into the night. The visibility was fair in haze and light fog. The air temperature was mild. I never did pay much attention to the air temperature. Although, I did notice, at one point, that it was 45F. It was probably higher than that. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 59F with a low of 37F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 52F (with a low of 35F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 36F).

Everything today revolved around building the reservation book and the Guestletter. I worked on the Guestletter until 11:00 AM. I worked on the reservation book until it was time to eat dinner. In the meantime, I had a couple of doctor's issues (paperwork), the plumbers working on the grease trap, finalizing some PMC stuff, going on with the POS stuff at the restaurant, setting up a future meeting and answering emails of various types. That was about it.

I hated to drag myself away from the Guestletter this morning. It's becoming interesting now with the trophy list and how it compares to previous years. I get off on fishing stats like some people get off on sports stats. Just my thing, I guess.

Friday, January 25, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F (the air temperature had been above freezing all night), the sky was clear, a partial moon was hanging over head, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean appeared to be good at best. The visibility turned excellent after sunrise and remained excellent throughout the day. The air temperature dropped a bit more but I never did look at a thermometer to see what I deemed as the high of the day in Ogunquit. It seemed cool all day. The high temperatures shown in the three cities below were probably taken after midnight. The sky remained clear. The wind blew out of the west all day with no variation in direction. Wind speeds ranged from fifteen to twenty knots with some higher gusts. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 42F with a low of 29F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 22F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 39F (with a low of 25F).

After posting yesterday's report, I worked on finishing up the reservation book, which I completed by 9:30 AM. That was about the same time that Micah showed up to bring the Petrel to the dock for the new side curtain refit. I went back and forth with that for a while. It was Micah's project so I wasn't there for very long. The rest of the day I worked on the Guestletter.

By 4:00 PM, I had figured out who was the Fisherman of the Year in 2018. It was Jonathan Griffin (MA) again. But he didn't win by very much. Joe Columbus (MA) was right behind him with Dan Killay (VT) in third place. And, actually, Dan didn't complete a full ten trips as Jonathan and Joe had. Just the same, I added in comparative value points (CVPs) where either Dan or Joe had fished with Jonathan. Dan had only one good day where he came out on top of Jonathan. But that was only one trip and it didn't give him nearly enough points to beat Griff, even if Dan had attended the right number of trips. But, then again, maybe Dan would have done better had he attended a couple more. Joe came out even in trips that where he and Griff were both fishing. So Joe didn't score any extra points under CVPs. Congratulations, Griff! Nice job!

I received another donation sponsoring me in my bicycle ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge coming up on August 3, 2019. The donors were Peter & Patricia Vangsness (MA) for a generous $100.00 in memory of Mike Koppstein, my sister, Cathy's, husband who recently passed away at 65 years young. Thank you both for your sensitivity, generosity and kindness. This is very much appreciated by me and, of course, those who are in need and lack hope. And I'm glad that you feel the move to Precision for Kids is a good one. I think so and I'm excited, particularly since a hundred percent of the donation will be going to research.

Saturday, January 26, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 20F, the sky was crystal clear with a half moon hanging high, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the west for most of the rest of the morning. Diminishing, the westerly wind might have been ten knots before noon. The afternoon had southwest winds of ten or twelve knots. The air temperature got up to a high of 31F, that I saw. The visibility was excellent. The sky was mostly clear. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 36F with a low of 25F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 29F (with a low of 12F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 30F (with a low of 17F).

After 7:00 AM, I shut out the world and concentrated on working on the Guestletter. I still have a lot to do but I've made it easier to do the next one in 2020 - if I'm still around. I only went outside once, to check on my mother.

I forgot to mention that yesterday, late afternoon, Deb, our dog (Gill) and I drove to Portsmouth in my truck. I needed to get a few things including preventative maintenance pills. One set of pills I take are fish oil pills. Coming back, it was late, we decided to stop in for Chinese food at Greenleaves in York. When we came out, there were fish oil pills all over the truck; on the seat, behind the seat, on the floor, etc. Gill had jumped in the back, must have smelled the fish oil, chewed open the plastic top and opened the pill bottle. He was a very sorry looking dog when we got back to the truck. Deb was upset. I wasn't, only because I have fed herring to our other dogs over the years while packing away boxes of shrimp in the winter. And a call to the animal hospital in Newington confirmed that the dog would be okay. In the meantime, Gill's breath filled the truck with a fish odor, that if you didn't know, made the truck smell like someone left and old redfish rack under the back seat. There were two hundred pills in the bottle. When I corralled the pills scattered in the truck, I came up with one hundred and twenty-two. So the dog could have ingested seventy-eight pills, probably seventy-eight times the normal dosage for a dog! And we couldn't get near the dog all last night and most of today. Fish breath! And he did look a sorry dog last night and this morning!

Sunday, January 27, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 18F, the sky was crystal clear with three planets looking at me over the eastern horizon and a partial moon headed west, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the southeast at fifteen knots, more or less for the first part of the morning. By 10 AM, the wind was directly out of the south and starting to breeze up. By 11:00 AM, the southerly wind was a sustained twenty-five knots with some higher gusts. Southerly wind is usually a fairly steady wind. And it certainly was today. By later afternoon, we had wind speeds hovering around twenty-eight knots. Seas were big combing chops. The sky was clear to start, mostly cloudy after noon with sun here and there. There was no precipitation whatsoever. The air temperature got up to at least 40F. But, I didn't pay much attention to the air temperature today. I can tell you that it felt mild. The visibility was good in haze. It was a typical smokey southerly. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 47F with a low of 27F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 40F (with a low of 7F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 41F (with a low of 14F).

After 7:00 AM, I was back on the Guestletter. I worked straight through until 2:30 PM on it, skipping lunch, so I could get to a good ending point in order to start again on a good place tomorrow. It was the Sabbath so I never went back to it. I went for a run just sky of 5 miles, had a late lunch at 4:00 PM and then started working on a project that's going to take me away from attending to this update section of my web page (and the Guestletter) until the weekend.

Monday, January 28, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 25F, the sky was crystal clear with a half moon a third of the way across the sky, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

I spent these few days during the week over in England, with a friend of mine, from Leicester, with the main purpose of the visit to watch a Primier League English football game between Liverpool and Leicester, in Liverpool. It was quite and experience and one I couldn't pass up after the invitation. I got back home late on Friday, February 1.

The first day of Bunny Clark reservations were taken today, Friday, at 6:00 AM. Deb was alone manning the phones. It was fairly busy for the first hour. But the recreational fishing regulations have been put on hold because of the temporary government shut-down. So, until we sort out the catch totals from 2018 and the Recreational Advisory Panel (RAP) meets and looks at the model projections, I won't know or have a feel for what the new regulations will be. I don't think the new regulations will be ready by May 1, the first day of the fiscal Federal fishing year. So if cod is in our future, it won't kick in until the new regulations are imposed. I was very upbeat and hopeful for improvements this season in the recreational fishing regulations, until the government shut-down. I'm still upbeat. But I'm cautious as much time has gone by between the hint of a regulation change to the opening of the government. RAP proposals were supposed to have been presented during the New England Fishery Management Council meeting that was held from January 26 - 28. So we have probably lost two months in the process. Stay tuned.

Saturday, Februray 2, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 7F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the west all day. Wind speeds started at fifteen knots or so, increased a bit around noon and dropped to ten and fifteen knots near sunset. Not a remarkable day for weather overall, I saw an air temperature of 27F, which was probably not the highest air temperature of the day, the skies were mostly clear and the visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 35F with a low of 14F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 30F (with a low of -10F). Concord's low today is the lowest air temperature recorded for 2019 so far, by seven degrees. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 26F (with a low of -2F). The -2 value today is Portland's lowest air temperature reading for the year so far.

I spent the whole day working on the Guestletter. I completed it at 4:00 PM. I still need to add about ten digital images, it needs to be proofed by someone else and I need to clean it up a bit. But it is done. It's the longest one I have ever written. But it might also be the most easy to read. Above all, it's a comparative analysis of the Bunny Clark through the years to the present and a review of last years fun. I like to have it as a reference for the next one. It's certainly a labor of love. It takes too much of my time. But I learn something every time I write one. And it's done.

I called it quits on the working day after 4:00 PM, took Gill for a four mile run on the beach, jumped on the stat bike to shake out the legs for a half hour, had dinner, went to bed and read for about an hour before falling asleep.

I want to get back to the upcoming regulations for a minute. If the new regulations are not in place by May 1, 2019, the old regulations will be in place. In other words, a 12 fish haddock bag limit with a 17" minimum size and no cod possession. I don't believe that new regulations won't be in effect by September 17th. But if that is the case, we won't be able to keep haddock from that time until November 1, 2019. That would be pretty extreme to think that we would not have new regulations by August 1, 2019. It would also be unprecedented. I really think that the regulations will be better this year. Either we will be able to keep haddock throughout our season or we will be able to keep cod when we can't keep haddock. We won't be able to keep many cod, if we are able to keep them. But I do think that the recreational regulations will be better.

Also, although I didn't dwell on our first day of reservations, I also didn't mention, probably, enough about that first day. We had the same number of reservations coming in as we have the last three years. This was expected and good. I am very hopeful for the new season.

Other than that; Go Pats!!!!!!!!!!!

Super Bowl Sunday, Februray 3, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 21F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was light all day. The ocean along the shore was flat calm. Late in the afternoon, the wind stabilized out of the south. By the time the Super Bowl started, the southerly wind was blowing a sustained fifteen knots. The southerly wind rolled into the night at the same basic velocity, more or less. The sky was clear in the morning and part of the afternoon, overcast for the rest of the day. The visibility was excellent. The highest air temperature that I saw was 35F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 39F with a low of 27F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 32F (with a low of 12F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 33F (with a low of 6F).

Today was a boring but productive day. I worked on the this web site and I worked on the Guestletter, finishing it at 4:30 PM. Essesntially, I selected all the digital images and got them in place, having finished the first draft in writing, yesterday. I took a break to watch a Primier League (English) football game between Leicester City and Manchester United. But, basically, I just worked at the desk.

I had a minor hamstring pull from running with Gill on Ogunquit Beach yesterday. So I sat on ice all day and felt much better by the time I was ready to give up work for the day.

I also watched my third Super Bowl, from start to finish. I don't like to watch them alone, particularly when the Patriots are there. I'm not the best of losers and I like my sleep. But, tonight, we were invited over to our friend's house. Deb and I had a great time. It was a very fun night.

Monday, Februray 4, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 34F, the sky was overcast, the wind was light from the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The wind picked up to about ten knots from the southwest. The wind velocity remained about the same with higher gusts and left us at noon. The wind was light out of the south for the rest of the daylight hours. The ocean along the shore was calm. It might have switched to the southwest after dark but I didn't notice it as the wind was so light. The salient feature of the weather today was the air temperature. There was massive melting. This gave me the opportunity to shovel the snow that we needed to get out of areas that might freeze later in the week. The highest air temperature that I saw was 50F. It might have been higher at some point. The sky was mostly sunny all day and the visibility was very good. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 35F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 26F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 31F).

I had way too much planned for today. I never got it all done. Things I had to address today included the grease trap at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., J1 students for the upcoming season, getting a new davit fabricated for the Petrel, side curtains with Steve Eberle (Canvasworks), table frames repaired, truck inspection and registration, mooring bills pain, issues with the parking lot, building a new frame for lobster tank at Etc., fabricating new lids for the steamer tanks, bringing the ceilings up to code in both places and dealing with a whole host of items we might sell at Barnacle Billy's in the future.

I did an hour of shoveling snow. I worked on a gray water issue with the washing machine at the house. We had a managers meeting at 10:00 AM. Here we discussed employees; who's coming back, what we need in different areas of the different work areas and shifting employees according to their preferences of working areas for the upcoming season. Basically, I got the ball rolling in a lot of issues that should be resolved in a week's time. So it was a lot of running around with little time at the computer.

I did some proofing on the Guestletter. Compared to the amount of proofing I do on this part of the site every day, I could put up the Guestletter. And I suppose I could edit it and re-write sentences at my leisure. But I know that if I put it up I will not edit it. So I'm holding back just a little more.

And I did find time to run with Gill on Ogunquit Beach. I've been having hamstring issues. These aren't bad enough to keep me from running but I have been sitting on a lot of ice lately and it's something that I have to make sure to monitor so it doesn't get worse. Always something [And I know what you are thinking, Greg Veprek!].

Tuesday, Februray 5, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 38F, the sky was partly overcast, the wind was light from the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. The salient weather feature of the day was, again, the higher than normal air temperature. Later in the afternoon, I saw a high of 62F. It was just like spring. The wind was stronger than the last couple of days but not much stronger. Winds remained out of the southwest at about fifteen knots, dropping around sunset and hauling out of the west. West winds turned into northwest around the time of the State of Union address. This wind change ushered in the cooler temperatures. The sky was mostly clear all day. There was much melting on the roads with large puddles everywhere. The visibility was good to very good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 65F with a low of 40F). The high temperature reading of 65F in Boston today breaks the ties record high for this date of 65F, set in 1991. Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 59F (with a low of 29F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 62F (with a low of 30F). The high temperature reading of 62F in Portland today breaks the previous record high for this date of 51F, set in 2005. Keep in mind that temperature records in Portland have only been kept for less than eighty years.

After working on this update, I posted the un-proofed Guestletter. I plan to go back and forth editing it and posting it. I just couldn't wait any longer. And I have much other stuff that I have to move on.

Once I was free of the office, I had to drive to Canvasworks to pick up tie straps for the Bunny Clark side curtains. From there I had to bring steamer tank lids from the restaurant to DSM Fabrication in Biddeford to have repair work completed on two of them. I spent almost the whole rest of the day in Portsmouth picking up boat materials, visiting the dealership for a quick truck fix, the doctor's office for an appointment and various other things that I had on a list that I had compiled for when I got the chance to go to Portsmouth. I got home and 3:00 PM and took the rest of the daylight hours to ride my bike in the warmer than normal weather. I got soaked on the bike because there was so much melting going on. But it was warm enough to ride without gloves and to stay warm despite the fact that I was wet.

Wednesday, Februray 6, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 29F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued out of the northeast at an average of fifteen knots throughout the morning. The sky was clear all morning. After noon, clouds started encroaching the sky. The wind hauled out of the east and dropped a bit. By sunset, the wind was more south of east. Wind speeds had been no more than ten knots for the entire afternoon. They sky was completely overcast by 5:00 PM. It really looked like it was going to rain or snow, particularly to the north. But we had no precipitation by the time I went to bed. The highest air temperature that I saw was 33F. The visibility was excellent all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 44F with a low of 33F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 39F (with a low of 25F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 36F (with a low of 27F).

After posting this daily missive, I proofed a few more paragraphs of the Guestletter. But most of the day was spent working on ordering (paint, brushes, etc.), down at the restaurant trying to finish up the grease trap stuff, running around town, securing a line of credit with the bank and at Ocean Graphics, setting up the design for the tackle breaker and PMC t-shirts and working on the new design for the "largest fish of the trip" stickers.

In the morning, our plumber set up the fire sprinkler system at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., part of the terms under which we received our liquor license through the fire inspection earlier this winter. Every fire inspection finds something new that we need to do in order to come in under the terms of the fire code. No inspection can find everything. Laws change. And new inspectors have different ideas from the inspectors of the past. I go through the same thing with the U. S. Coast Guard inspections on the Bunny Clark. Every two or three years the inspectors change. They always have new ideas. We are very keen on keeping both the restaurants up and the Bunny Clark in good order. So these demands are easily met. However, it takes getting the right people in there, the time to organize, the scheduling to get people there and the time in the follow-up to make sure we are in compliance. You never want to assume anything.

I started very early this morning. So I called it quits at 3:30 PM.

Thursday, Februray 7, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 32F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling/misty with frozen sleet on the ground/driveway, the wind was light out of the southeast and the visibility over the ocean seemed good. The wind blew out of the east all day. Light in the morning, it increased to about fifteen knots, ambient, during the afternoon. The visibility was good most of the day in precipitation, rain mostly. Later in the afternoon, the rain stopped and the visibility was very good, at least. The sky remained overcast for the day. The highest air temperature that I saw was 37F, during the afternoon. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 42F with a low of 35F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 35F (with a low of 31F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 37F (with a low of 31F).

I spent most of the day in the office, either at the restaurant or at home, mostly home. I was on the phone quite a bit. I had one more order to complete. And, for most of it, I did the last proof I am going to do on the Guestletter. That was completed by 4:00 PM.

I also spent some time with our plumber, Fred Fornier, and Dan from A1 Septic, going over the grease trap to make sure the new setup was okay. It was okay. But, just okay. So I am probably going to install a new grease trap made out of fiberglass or heavy plastic. I know more about this later.

I also had to spend some time on LD 505, a bill sponsored by Representative Deane Rykerson (D - Kittery) that would eliminate disposable food ware from being used in take-out restaurants who also provide seating. In a House that is largely Democrats, this is a scary bill. So I spent some time crafting a letter to Representative Rykerson and, later, got a generic response. The hearing comes up on the 20th. It's always something. But there are many other bills on the horizon that makes it look like a free-for-all in Augusta. Representative Rykerson was born in Kansas but resides in Kittery Point, where Deb grew up. I have never met the man.

By 4:00 PM, I was fed up with the office. So I decided to take Gill for a run on Ogunquit Beach. The wind was blowing east northeast so it was right in our faces running up the beach. With conditions like this, Gill is slow to run. If the wind is stronger than fifteen knots, he stops at the quarter mile mark and won't go further. He went all the way today. But it was a fight to keep him going. It seemed like I was dragging him on the leash for the last half of the run up. And he didn't look happy. He tried to stop once. But I convinced him to keep going. Once off the leash, he became a happy dog again. I went further up on my own but not so far that I lost track of him. He loved the run back. He ambushed me about a quarter of a mile from my turn-around point. From there he would sprint ahead (as if I could run after him), let me catch up and then sprint ahead again. Eventually, he would fall back and keep the pace from behind me. If I don't look back, that's where he will stay. If I look back and he sees me, he will sprint up to me, look up at me and then sprint ahead for a short ways. I took two pictures of him, one showing him catching up and, the other, a close up while along side. Both digital images appear below.





Friday, Februray 8, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 33F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling rain, the ice on the roads was gone, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was good. The wind became established out of the south at daylight, increasing to almost twenty knots by 11:00 AM and then backing off into the early afternoon. It rained all morning, mostly light rain. After noon, the rain stopped. The sky stayed overcast until just before 1:30 PM, when the sun came out. The clouds were completely gone by 3:00 PM. About that time, the wind started to howl, topping forty knots in gusts. The wind was out of the west, a new direction. The wind continued to howl out of the west on into the night. The air temperature reached a high of 50F by 3:00 PM. The air temperature remained in the high forties until 5:00 PM. The visibility after noon was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 57F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 49F (with a low of 26F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 50F (with a low of 29F).

The day today was pretty much like yesterday except that my Guestletter is completed for this year. This unless someone finds a mistake I can go back and change. So there was a lot of desk work involved here at home and at the restaurant. I did have the Ogunquit Fire Department come down and look at a sprinkler system that I put in to comply with a request during our fire inspection earlier this winter. We still have another item to finish up before we are in full compliance.

Most of the rest of the day I was on the phone with our painter, getting someone to come down and service the copier at Barnacle Billy's, ordering pellets and catching up with odds and ends. My day was done at 5:00 PM.

Saturday, Februray 9, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 20F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at thirty knots with higher gusts and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued to blow hard out of the west northwest. Wind speeds were thirty knots sustained with some gusts over forty knots. Wind abated somewhat after sunset. But the wind never dropped below forty knots to my knowledge. The sky was sunny all day, cloudless for most of it. The air temperature stayed down in the twenties. The highest air temperature that I saw was 31F. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 36F with a low of 25F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 30F (with a low of 16F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 31F (with a low of 18F).

Unfettered by the normal working week where there is always someone who wants to get in touch or someone you have to reach, I worked at the desk without interruption. At 2:00 PM, I got together with Deb to go and find some running shoes for her. That turned into Chinese and, later, home to bed. I had a fairly unremarkable day.

Cancer claimed another victim today, my sister, Meg's, fianc's dad. I think, actually, it was last night. I learned about it this morning. He had been sick for a while. It got to the point where he didn't want to be treated anymore. It had been a trying few months for the family. And I feel so sorry for them.

Sunday, Februray 10, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 19F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at about twenty knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew fairly hard out of the west all morning with wind speeds of twenty knots sustained and higher gusts. After noon, the wind hauled more northwest and blew a little bit harder. The wind was already dropping off by sunset. There was about ten knots of northwest wind at 8:00 PM. The air temperature seemed cold all day but that was probably influenced more by the wind. Someone told me that they saw a high of 34F in Ogunquit. I didn't see it but I wasn't really paying attention. The sky was mostly sunny all day. The visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 37F with a low of 24F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of 15F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 16F).

I worked at the desk in the early part of the morning. Most of the rest of the morning I worked on bicycle wheels and tires while also watching two Priemier League games, Tottenham/Leicester first and Manchester City/Chelsea. After lunch, I worked on getting my state licensing up to date, printing and placing. I also adjusted the Bunny Clark "day sheets", "stocking orders" and passenger manifest for 2019. Afterward, I printed a year's worth of each. My day was done at 4:30 PM.

Monday, Februray 11, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 22F, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was blowing lightly out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind continued light out of the northwest. After sunset, the wind hauled out of the north and the wind speed increased to fifteen knots or better. The sky was mostly clear all day. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature in Ogunquit got up as high as 31F, to my knowledge. I didn't look at the thermometer much but there was nothing in the feel of it to make me look much. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 37F with a low of 26F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 31F (with a low of 15F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 14F).

Today was a day for getting things done. The beasts were back out of their cages. And battles were fought on the phone, in person and on line. This was a Barnacle Billy's day. I ended up going over various advertising bids, upcoming legislature battles at the state house, employee recruitment, a couple meetings, getting our copy machine cleaned, showing our painter around for some winter jobs, going over local donations, setting up for getting the furnace changed out in April and making decisions on the new grease trap. All fun stuff.

There was some Bunny Clark stuff. All this centered around upcoming regulations. Because of the partial government shutdown, all work on recreational management models ceased, our Recreational Advisory Panel meeting was canceled and other meetings were held but these meeting were missing some core stuff that should have really been there. We, of course, were left in the dark, which meant that those patrons, left to make reservations, couldn't make them with the firm knowledge of what fish were going to be available to be kept. And that's such a hassle. I don't know when the Council is going grasp the importance of regulation stability in our fishery. Do they even care? There is a Council Planning & Development Team meeting on Wednesday, a Webinar, that I plan to attend on line. They will be discussing/formulating recreational regulations. I hope to have some input. That's the day after tomorrow.

Tuesday, Februray 12, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 12F, the sky was perfectly crystal clear, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was light from the northeast all morning and into the afternoon. The sky was clear until before noon, clouding up around noon and overcast by 2:00 PM. We saw our first snowflakes at 4:00 PM. We started to see the wind pipe up at that time too. By 5:00 PM, we saw the wind haul out of the east and blow up over ten knots. Easterly winds were blowing twenty-five knots sustained at 9:00 PM with higher gusts. The air temperature never got over 20F during the daylight hours in Ogunquit. At 7:30 PM, the air temperature had risen to 29F. We also had about three inches of snow at that time. The visibility was poor in falling snow from sunset on into the night. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 38F with a low of 19F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 21F (with a low of 9F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 32F (with a low of 10F). I suspect that the 32F reading was taken before midnight in Portland.

I worked at the desk until about 9:00 AM. After that, Micah had called and wanted to set up a permanent storm stern mooring for the Petrel. It was low tide so I set up a long piece of line we could use and got the grapple and met Micah at the house. We sculled around in the skiff looking for an old mooring to grapple up. We ended up grappling an old mooring where the tag line had been cut. This was perfect as we didn't have to use our own line. When we were finished with using it, we could buoy it off and alert the harbor master of it's status. Luckily, the harbor master was there so I could tell him what we were doing and how we figured it out.

At 10:30 AM, I had to run as I had a dentist's appointment at 11:00 AM. I had some running around afterward and then lunch. At 2:00 PM, I went back to the office work. I finished with that at 4:30 PM.

I received a very generous $250.00 donation from Tom Bruyere & The St. Lawrence River Rats sponsoring me in this years Pan-Mass Challenge, an 192 mile cycling event to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Tom & Company have made this an annual thing with the same figure for I don't know how many years. It's been a lot. And I certainly appreciate the support. Thanks so much, men! Always so generous!

Wednesday, Februray 13, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 35F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was blowing out of the northeast at thirty knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair in haze, precipitation and mist. At daylight there was still a bit of light rain. But it didn't last. The wind blew thirty knots or better out of the northeast until just after sunrise as well. By 8:00 AM, the wind had hauled out of the north and had dropped significantly. By 10:00 AM, we had a sustained twenty knot breeze out of the north. The air temperature had dropped to 29F by that same time. There were intermittent snow flurries from then until noon. The sky cleared in the afternoon and the air temperature rose, again, to 36F, the highest air temperature that I saw today. The visibility was excellent. Later in the afternoon, the wind hauled out of the northwest and then out of the west. Wind speeds at sunset were about fifteen knots or less out of the west. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 43F with a low of 33F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 21F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 34F (with a low of 28F).

I worked on the computer for most of the morning, ran with Gill on the beach for five miles and then went home for lunch.

At 12:30 PM, I took part in a Webinar hosted by the New England Fishery Management Council's (NEFMC) Planning & Development Team (PDT). The topics included the recreational regulations for the 2019 fishing season along with the bioeconomic models used to come up with a plan and observer coverage on commercial groundfish boats and what can be taken from observer coverage. I was there to listen to the discussion on upcoming recreational regulations. The discussion centered around the groundfish landings by sector, the sectors being the head boats, charter boats, private vessels and anglers fishing from the shore. Landings comparisons were made between the 2017 season and the 2018 fishing season. Keep in mind, the 2018 fishing season is not over yet. The 2018 fiscal fishing season ends on May 1, 2019. But restrictions are such that I don't believe the landings data will impact the data any more than the data that was presented. The long and the short of the discussion, to me, was that haddock landings were way under the total allowable landings/mortality figure the recreational angler has to work with. We were also under the figure used for cod. However, we were closer to the cod figure than I felt comfortable with moving forward and recreational effort was way below what everyone expected. With increased effort we might get too close to catching (or killing) the number of cod allowed.

I listened to this (I wasn't allowed to comment, although I had the technical capacity to do so) and looked at the six models presented, one of the six could be accepted as new regulations for the 2019 fishing season. The sixth, the least restrictive, gave us a 15" haddock size limit, no fall haddock closure (last season we were prohibited from keeping haddock from September 17 until November 1), a 15 haddock bag limit and one cod/person of a 19" size limit, from August until November 1. This could be approved. But the projections of such regulations put us at a cod mortality total of 145 metric tons. We are allowed 220 metric tons. On face value, this model seems to get us where we want to go. However, there are two things that worry me about this model. One, there is tremendous uncertainty that this will really bring cod in at 145 mt. In fact, I think it would be much higher than that figure mainly because of increased effort we should see in August. Remember these models are based on a, historically, low effort in 2018. Two, MRIP, the data collection system in place for recreational angler, is changing for next season. I believe that this new data (whether it's right or wrong) will show that the mortality rate on cod is higher. If it's too high, regulations for 2020 may prevent us from keeping cod and may give us a fall prohibition (of possession) season on haddock again. Or worse!

Worried about this, I called Scott Steinback (he and Min-Yang Lee are economists who work at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center for NOAA and draw up these models), who was the presenter today at the PDT meeting. I found that Scott was worried about that same model as well. We were both worried that this would be the model chosen to be used in the regulations. Like me, he wasn't worried about the haddock, he was worried about the cod mortality. So I asked him if he could run another model with haddock at a minimum size of 17", a 15 haddock bag limit, no fall closure of haddock and a cod/person in September and October at 21" (instead of 19"). He told me that they had already run a model with those parameters and that it would drop the cod mortality from 145 to 121 mt! Some members of the NEFMC are worried enough about going over the cod limit, that even this might not be enough to allow them to accept it. But this newer model takes us 100 mt away from the limit in the environment of the way these models were crafted. Taking August out would really reduce effort and there are enough cod on the fishing grounds caught in the 19 to 21 inch range as to be worrisome with a 19" minimum size. I think this model will work fine. What will be accepted moving forward remains in the cards but I feel very confident that whatever we get for regulations will be much better than the last two seasons and we should be able to keep haddock throughout the season. We shall see.

I had some desk work to do after the meeting ended at 4:30 PM. This took me to 5:15 PM. I had had enough with work by then.

Valentine's Day, Thursday, Februray 14, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 25F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at twenty plus knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew out of the west at twenty knots, more or less, all morning and for an hour into the afternoon. Early afternoon saw the wind back off a bit and continue to slowly back off until sunset. By 6:00 PM, we had ten knots of westerly wind at the house. The sky was clear all day, the visibility was excellent and the air temperature was above freezing for most of the day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 40F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 34F (with a low of 18F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 36F (with a low of 19F).

After a short stint in the office writing up this report, I spent the rest of the day working on projects for Barnacle Billy's, Inc.

I went down to let the painters in the restaurant at 7:30 AM only to find out that Jack Ladderbush was already there working on a carpentry project that I had asked him to complete. I love that guy and don't know what I would do without him. By 9:00 AM, I was involved in a meeting with all our managers. I wanted representation at a hearing on a bill coming up in Augusta on February 20th. I won't be able to be there. If I was going to be able to be there that day, I would enjoy attending. So I had to make sure some one (or two, as it turns out) was going to be there. We also talked about bringing in some new embroidered quarter zip pull overs (9 ounce), hats and a winter hat. The discussion then moved to employees and J1 students. And there was a list of other things I needed to get out of the way before we were through.

After the meeting, I drove to Ocean Graphics to talk to Kevin about some print work. From there I went to Bullshirt Custom to place the embroidery order.

At noon, I met captain's Greg Veprek, Micah Tower and Ian Keniston for lunch at Greenleaves Chinese. Greg was buying so I couldn't resist. Greg is the king of sarcasm. And, normally, he is pretty hard on me. But today he wasn't that bad. [Actually, I appreciate the abuse!] He and I share a lot of the same ideas and feelings. We talked about regulations (stripers and groundfish). Plus, we had a lot of catching up to do. It was a good lunch and a great break in the day.

The rest of the day was spent working off the list created at the managers meeting this morning. There were a lot of group emails as I was finding answers to questions raised earlier in the morning. This will continue on through another "work day" tomorrow.

Friday, Februray 15, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 26F, the sky was patchy clear, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots or less and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind increased out of the south to a sustained twenty knots by noon. The wind had been blowing up to twenty knots before that time. There were gusts up to almost thirty knots not an hour later. After that, though, the wind started to back off. The southerly wind was about fifteen knots at 5:00 PM. At about 10:00 AM, it started to rain. It rained steadily until later afternoon when it became intermittent. The air temperature was mild. I only looked at the thermometer once and saw 36F. But the air temperature had to be over 40F, as warm as it was. The visibility was fair in haze and precipitation. The skies were overcast from dawn until dark and beyond. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 52F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 19F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 44F (with a low of 17F).

The day was spent running around trying to accomplish the goals outlined by the Barnacle Billy's manager's meeting yesterday. Included were making a decision on buying housing, the selection of a new white polo shirt as part of the uniform moving forward, filling out job offers for J1 students, scoping out talking points for the state legislative hearing next week, attending a meeting on the design of a new lobster containment tank at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., going over the bright work projects there, spending a good amount of time in the office bringing the rest of the crew up to date on mission accomplished (or not so much, in one case) and on the phone every minute that I was at the wheel of the truck.

At lunch, I settled in at the desk at home to craft a letter to the New England Fishery Management Council. I wanted to call attention to another regulation model that I support as a member of the Federal Recreational Advisory Panel (RAP). I was informed that, the model I supported a couple of days ago, was not going to be in the packet being presented at the RAP meeting. I will not be able to attend the upcoming RAP meeting so I wanted to make it public record where my thoughts were leaning toward and why. I also sent a copy to the Chair of the RAP, Frank Blount, who agreed to be my proxy on the matter. My proposal, which had already been run as a model through the Science Center (NOAA), has a greater chance of achieving success than the most popular model being presented. [I mentioned this in the 2-13-19 entry] It would still give us haddock throughout the season starting on April 15, 2019 and going straight through the whole season (eliminating the fall closure from September 17 to November 1), maintain the 17" size limit on haddock, increase the bag limit from 13 to 15 haddock/person and would open a cod season at one cod/person starting September 1st and running until October 31st with a minimum size limit of 21 inches. My main focus is keeping the haddock season open throughout. It would be nice to see the two month cod season in wave 5 as well. But it's not necessary. If anyone would like a copy of the letter, it's now public record from the Council. But I will also send you a copy if you email me at sowhake@gmail.com.

At 5:00 PM, I took out dog, Gill, for a walk around town in the rain. It was a fast walk with jogging up all the hills. Gill had to be on a leash the whole time. That wasn't always the case. At first, I left him off the leash. He seemed to be keeping up with me which was also a fast walk for him. I got day dreaming and realized the dog wasn't with me anymore. So I walked back to where I had seen him last. No Gill! But I did see his footprints in the old snow off the side of the road. So I called his name. A first I had nothing. Eventually, I saw his nose peeking around the corner of the back of a house. He took his sweet old time getting back to me. In fact, I had to walk in the snow and put the leash on him. He didn't really like it. But I couldn't have him running out in the road or getting lost on me again. So, reluctantly, he picked up the pace and stayed with me. We made a couple of "smell stops". But, other than those stops, we kept a torrid pace for 2.2 miles averaging 13:10/mile. And that included the time I stood waiting and calling for him.

Deb and I were invited to dinner at 6:00 PM. Guess where? Greenleaves! Again!

Also, our head chef and kitchen manager at Barnacle Billy's, Etc., Tomas Sullivan, is in a wedding contest. He and his number one, Angela Kanaley, are getting married. If they win this contest, at this link, it will give them $100,000.00 to produce the wedding in a manner that would be very special for them. Since Tom is very special to me and the business, I would ask that you click on the link and vote for them to, hopefully, accomplish this goal and win the contest. I wish them the best of luck! Also, before I leave, it's worth noting that you can vote once a day, every day, from the same email address, until the contest is over. Of course, I'll be voting every day!

Saturday, Februray 16, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 30F, the sky was partly cloudy with some stars (not including Venus), the wind was had very little say in moving a leaf around the house (although it was blowing a sustained sixteen knots at the Jungle Buoy eight miles offshore) and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. At sunrise, the leaves on the tops of the trees were moving in good shape under a northwest wind that ranged from fifteen to twenty knots. The wind remained the same in velocity and direction for the daylight hours. After sunset, the northwest wind increased a sckosh. The sky was mostly clear, the air temperature got well above the freezing mark and the visibility was excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 49F with a low of 31F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 36F (with a low of 20F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 39F (with a low of 23F).

I spent the whole day in the office, one office or another, getting everything I had done during the week in order and finalized. There was a lot to do. I had a late lunch and spent the rest of the day working around the house. That was it!

I received a very generous $250.00 donation sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money to fight cancer. The donation was from Richard Payeur & Elinor Kostanski, who have donated at least $200.00 every year since I started this drive in 2007. Thank you so much for your support and generosity. I do so appreciate it!

Sunday, Februray 17, 2019

At 5:00 AM EST the air temperature was 18F, the sky was crystal clear, the wind was light out of the northwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. More later.

This afternoon, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute received another wonderfully generous donation from my sister, Meg. She has sponsored me every year and has, given, by far, the most of any donor sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, the event that started it all. Her donation was made "In Loving Memory of Larry Remkiewicz, the Most Wonderful Husband, Dad, Friend & Human Being we had the Pleasure of Knowing and Having. We Miss You! Also, in Loving Memory of our Dear Brother in Law, Michael Koppstein. May You Both Rest in Peace." Thank you, Meg. Of course you know it means so very much to me. But means a hell of a lot more coming from you! And it means a hell of a lot more to those who need it the most and for the hope of a better future.

I am presently looking for a deck hand for the 2019 fishing season. If anyone is interested in the position, you can give us a call at 207-646-2214.









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