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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

June 22, 2017, 3:00 AM EDT



Halibut Brothers

The digital images above were taken during the marathon trip of June 1, 2017. The angler on the left is Mark Cote (ME) holding his 9 pound sub-legal halibut. This is the first halibut that Mark has ever caught. The shot on the right is a digital image of Chris Cote (ME) holding his 14 sub-legal halibut. Chris had never caught a halibut before either. Both anglers are brothers and fish on the Bunny Clark periodically. It's unusual to catch a halibut on a deep sea fishing trip with rod & reel. It's very unusual to catch two halibut on one trip. But it's really odd to have two halibut caught on the same trip by the only two brothers aboard at the time! A great day was had by all, including me!




Expected Regulations for the 2017 Bunny Clark Fishing Season

For the foreseeable future, the Federal saltwater recreational fishing regulations will remain the same as they were last year starting on May 1, 2017. So this means that we will still have the fifteen haddock bag limit with a minimum retention size of seventeen inches. Also, last years rules also included a bag limit of one cod per person starting in August and ending at the end of September. However, the National Marine Fisheries Service is preparing a proposed new rule (new regulations) soliciting comments on new measures recommended by the New England Fishery Management Council. Once the proposed rule is out, more information will be available. I suspect that a new set of regulations will be in place by the time August rolls around or before the time we get a chance to keep a cod. But I don't know this for fact. The wheels of government turn slowly. Stay tuned.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 52F, the sky looked overcast (too much fog to tell if it was the fogs influence or a canopy of clouds), there was no wind ashore and the visibility over the ocean was poor in black thick fog. When I first got to the Cove this morning, the fog was right up to the footbridge. But as we got ready to leave, almost an hour later, the fog had backed away from the shore a bit. As we headed out the channel on the way to the fishing grounds, I could see my way to the first turn and then had to rely on the radar and track plotter from there to the gate. We rode through black thick fog for the first hour out. After that, the fog disappeared and the ride became easier. There was very little wind for the rest of the ride. Winds were light out of the southwest with a small chop with not enough wind to make a white cap. The visibility was very good and the sky was clear.

On the grounds, the wind blew southwest. Light at first, the wind picked up to about ten knots, at the most. Seas were small white caps over a sea swell from the southeast that ranged from three to five or more feet. The seas were spread out enough that it was never uncomfortable. The wind had dropped to three or four knots when it was time to leave the fishing grounds. The sky was mostly sunny all day with some mixed sun and clouds around noon. The afternoon was mostly sunny as was the ride home. The highest air temperature I saw was 55F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50.4F. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 70F (with a low of 58F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was very good to excellent for most of the day except the last two drifts. And those two drifts didn't last very long. Landings were good only because we couldn't keep the cod. And cod is what we caught mostly. I couldn't count the cod but there were easily over a hundred cod between 6 or 7 pounds to 27 pounds. It was very early in the trip when I stopped weighing cod under 13 pounds. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. The pollock were of very good size. Legal landings also included thirty-six haddock and six cusk. The haddock cull was one legal fish for every two haddock caught. Some of the haddock were very good sized. We also released a dogfish and two sub-legal halibut. We drift fished all day. The drift was perfect. All terminal gear worked well.

Mark Cote (ME) was high hook with most legal fish and more market cod than anyone else. It was a Mark Cote kind of day! Ny Nyath (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 27 pound cod. This is the largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. And it is the largest cod that Ny has ever caught. I took a picture of Ny with his cod. This digital image appears on the right in this update entry. Some of Ny's other good fish included a 14.5 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and a 13 pound cod. Bill Murphy (MA) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 21 pound cod. This is the second largest cod caught on the Bunny Clark this season so far. Bill's largest pollock weighed 15 pounds. The third largest fish was an 18.75 pound cod caught by Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA). That cod is the fourth largest cod caught this season to date. Griff caught two cod of 10 pounds each before I stopped weighing cod of that size. He did catch a cod of 14 pounds. He also caught the second largest haddock of the day at 6 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Cote (ME) caught our second largest haddock of the season (so far) today with a Maine state trophy fish of 7.1 pounds. I took a picture of Chris with his prize. This digital image appears in the upper left of this entry. The fish was only twenty-five inches in fork length but its girth was almost sixteen inches. Chris caught a 4 pound haddock right afterward. His best fish was a 14 pound sub-legal halibut which we took a quick picture of and released. Sean Peetros (MA) caught a 13 pound pollock and several others I didn't weigh between 11 and 12 pounds. Mark Cote, Chris' brother, caught the other halibut. It too was sub-legal and weighed 9 pounds. I took a quick picture of that one as well and released it. These halibut were the first halibut either angler has ever caught on a rod & reel. Some of Mark's other good fish included a 13 pound pollock, a 13.5 pound pollock, a 15.5 pound cod and a 4.5 pound haddock. He also caught our first dogfish! Ouch! Ben Krahforst (NY) landed an 11.25 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Bob Heideman (MA) released a 17 pound cod, his biggest fish. Grace Krahforst (MA) caught cod as her two biggest fish. One weighed 13 pounds and the other weighed 13.5 pounds. Chris Krahforst (NY) caught one of the two best double keeper catches today. His catch included a 16 pound cod and an 8 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. Ray Westermann (MA) had a bigger double, I believe. I weighed the first one, a 13.5 pounder and he released the other before I got a chance to weigh it. The other was about the same size. Ray's best fish was a 17 pound pollock, the largest pollock of the trip. Some of Ray's other fish included two pollock of 14 pounds each and a cod of 13 pounds. Jim Jarvis (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock, the largest fish of his that I weighed. He might have caught bigger ones. In fact, I think he did. Larry Gill (ME) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Ray Thomas (MA) released a 17 pound cod. Eighty-six year old Ziggy Krahforst (NY) landed a 13.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. James Jarvis (MA) hooked into a porbeagle shark on the bottom near where he was catching his groundfish. Because of this I first thought it was a big halibut. When it started circling the boat I knew that it wasn't. James fought the fish for about fifteen minutes fighting through ten minutes of tangles in the process. About five minutes after he got clear to fight the fish unhindered, the line parted from chaffing on the sharks skin. For this and the fact that he lost two jigs, James landed the hard luck award t-shirt. The biggest fish of his that I weighed was a 12.5 pound pollock.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my bicycle ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both were $20.00. One donation came from Mark Cote, the other from Chris Cote. Thanks so very much for your support on this. As I have said so many times, but am just as serious about any comment I make in this regard, I very much appreciate your help! All the best to you both.

Friday, June 2, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind to write of and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least. After sunrise, the wind started to blow from the northwest and then west northwest. Wind speeds ashore were ten to fifteen knots. The sky was clear all day. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature reached a high of 73F in Ogunquit. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 46F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 72F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 69F (with a low of 42F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots. The ocean was calm with long sea swells of two to three feet from the southeast. The air temperature under the shade top reached a high of 58F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged well over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny for the trip. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50F, still very low for this time of year.

The fishing was very good to excellent. Landings were very good, touching on the edge of excellence. If cod could have been kept it would have been excellent, similar to Thursday's trip with one exception - haddock! Most fish caught today were haddock, the most we have seen in a while. There were more sub-legal haddock than legal haddock but it was close, Maybe 1.2 sub-legal to legal haddock. Something like that. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-five pollock, one cusk, two mackerel, a whiting and a cunner. They released fifty-five cod from 5 to 11 pounds. They drift fished for the trip. All terminal gear worked well.

Captain Ian could not tell me who was high hook. Dan Payne (ME)? I didn't ask. I should have. Katie "Killer" Hjerpe (NC) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cod. She also caught the second largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. That was the largest pollock of the trip. Dan Payne released the third largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. Chris Hjerpe (CT) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was mostly cloudy, there was no wind, the ocean was flat calm with some wind patches and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind blew up to twenty-five knots along the shore. The wind was northwest. It didn't reach off. It usually doesn't when the ocean water is cold. The air temperature was cool all day. I never did see it get to 70F. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. It rained very briefly. It didn't even rain long enough for anyone to want to get out of it. The visibility was excellent. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 41F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west at five to eight knots in the morning. There was no wind in the afternoon. There was a one foot chop before noon. The ocean was calm after noon. The visibility was "unlimited". The air temperature reached a high of 57.5F. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50.3F.

The fishing was excellent. Everything (except the halibut) were biting. As a result, they caught a lot of cod, small fish and legal fish. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. There were more sub-legal haddock than legal haddock but not by much. Over eighty-five cod were caught and released between 5 and 12 pounds. Legal landings also included thirteen pollock and eight cusk. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best for haddock. Jigs and cod flies worked best for the pollock and cod.

I wasn't told who was high hook with the most legal fish. John Warden (ME) caught the three largest fish of the trip or what we call an "ace". This is the third ace caught this season. Two of the last five seasons saw no aces at all. This year they seem to be more frequent and starting early in the season. John won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.25 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's sixth largest pollock of the fishing season to date. His other two bigger fish (second and third largest of the day) included a 12 pound cod and an 11.5 pound cod. He also caught a pollock that weighed 8 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Terry Colby (ME) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Paul Lessard (ME) caught an 11 pound cod, his best. Bill Murphy's (NH) best fish was also an 11 pound cod. Debra Sumner (MA) landed the hard luck award for not feeling in sync with the motion of the ocean.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 48F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the northwest, the ocean looked ruffled but calm and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at about fifteen knots, max, in the morning, died out around 10:30 or 11:00 AM and then hauled out of the southwest at ten knots. The sky was sunny for most of the day. We saw high thing clouds covering the sky at 2:00 PM. By 5:00 PM, the sky was overcast. The sky remained so throughout. The air temperature reached a high of 76F in Ogunquit. The visibility was very good, at least. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 44F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 70F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 73F (with a low of 41F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west all morning. Wind speeds were five to ten knots with a one foot chops and sea swells of about two feet. Just before noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest and blew the same producing the same sea state. The air temperature reached a high of 55F in the shade. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

The fishing was very good to excellent. It was a fish a cast. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, some of the best haddock fishing we have seen this season. The haddock cull was almost exactly one to one, keepers to sub-legal haddock. There were also a lot of cod caught and released. Ian counted forty from 4 pounds to 14.5 pounds. Legal landings also included thirteen pollock, one cusk and two cunners. One wolffish was released. Drifting was the method for every stop. Bait and cod flies worked the best for catching fish today. Jigs weren't much of a factor.

Ian couldn't figure out who was high hook. He went as far as trying to figure it out without counting fillets. It was an impossible task. David Moors (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 12 pound wolffish caught by Mike Darragh (ME). This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's second largest wolffish of the season to date. Bill O'Neil (ME) caught the third largest fish, a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Brendan Kenney (ME) caught an 8 pound cod and the largest pollock of the day at 7 pounds. Frank Bernard (NH) released a 9 pound cod that he caught. Brian Fallon (MA) landed the hard luck award for getting the most tangled lines.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was light from the south and the visibility over the ocean was good in precipitation. Ashore, the wind remained light out of the south until at least 9:00 AM. At 10:20 AM, the wind was blowing out of the east at eight knots. The wind stayed out of the east at, up to, fifteen knots. After 5:00 PM, the wind changed again, hauling out of the east northeast and blowing up to twenty knots. The sky was overcast all day. The rain had stopped by 7:00 AM, or nearly so. For the rest of the day we had no rain. There was plenty of mist and fog but no rain. The air temperature remained in the high 50s but it could have reached 60F or more. It felt as warm or warmer than 60F but I can't honestly say that I know what the air temperature value was. The visibility at times was poor in fog. Most of the time it was good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 58F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 57F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 57F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the morning saw the wind blow out of the southeast at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two to three feet. After noon, the wind hauled out of the east with the same wind speed and sea state. It was misty, wet and gray with a sea that matched the color of the horizon. This overcast and mist hung all day. A little less than half of the anglers were sea sick. The air temperature reached a high of 55F. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51F.

The fishing was excellent. A fish a cast for those who were fishing for the whole trip. Most fish were sub-legal haddock, cod they couldn't keep and some small pollock. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Today there were a few more haddock of the sub-legal variety than there were legal haddock. But there were plenty of small legal haddock. For total count, today was the second biggest haddock day of the season. May 12th's extreme day trip had only slightly more haddock caught. There were thirty-two cod from 4 pounds to 7 pounds released. And there were quite a few released cod that were smaller. Legal landings also included fifteen pollock, two cusk, three mackerel and one cunner. Another wolffish was caught and released today. Anchoring was the boating method. Only bait and cod flies were used today.

Ian could not determine who was high hook. Adam Quimby (ME) caught all the bigger fish today. In fact, he scored an "ace" today, the three largest fish of the trip! This is the fourth ace of the season and the most aces we have recorded ever for this time in the season. There are years where we see no aces at all. So to see so many so early is unprecedented. Adam won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He caught this as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 9.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The smaller pollock was the third largest fish of the trip. His other fish was also a pollock, a 10 pounder, the second largest fish of the trip. The fourth largest fish was, maybe, 7 pounds. There were a few 7 pounders caught.

Other Angler Highlights: Chris Littlefield (ME) landed the hard luck award today for attaining high hurler status. He was no good.

Not so Tim Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. Unfortunately, the weather will not be favorable enough to take the boat fishing today. I canceled this trip at 8:00 AM yesterday. The National Weather Service is calling for easterly winds of twenty-five to thirty-five knots. And I believe they are right this time! Amazing, that I would agree with the NWS! Stranger things have happened.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was blowing from the northeast at twenty-five knots (more or less), seas at the nearest weather buoy were eight feet every six seconds and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in haze and light precipitation. The wind continued to blow out of the northeast at twenty-five knots all morning. Some gusts came in at thirty knots. But the wind never blew any harder than that. It was just hard enough to make it a definite "no go" for a fishing trip. Ten knots less and we would have been there. The wind started to back off at noon. At that time most of the weather buoys were giving seas of ten feet or more every eight seconds. I saw the air temperature kiss the 50F mark at 3:00 PM. At that time the northeast wind was little more than ten knots. By sunset, there was no wind to speak of. Seas were still making a surge in the Cove. The sky remained overcast all day. And it rained all day. There was a period in the late afternoon when the rain stopped for about an hour. But it started up again and was still raining when I went to bed at 10:00 PM. The visibility was fair to good during the day. When the wind died, the fog set in along the coast making the visibility poor at best. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 53F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 52F with a low of 47F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 50F (with a low of 48F).

Except for working for a hour at the office at Barnacle Billy's, I spent from 4:00 AM to 10:00 AM working here at the desk at Bunny Clark Central. I easily get behind during the season. From there I went off a list of items I had planned to work on for the day. A dump run, orders, future logistics on upcoming fishing trips and working on items where I needed a day like today to finish. Some of these dealt with the restaurants. Ian showed up in the afternoon to put line on customer reels. I also went back and forth checking on business at Barnacle Billy's. It was a good day to get behind me.

Running around in the truck today gave me a good opportunity to be with our dog, Gill. And all day we competed with the truck window on the passenger side. He likes to have the window open when we ride together. I didn't want the rain getting in the truck. I finally gave up and let him have his way in the afternoon. Whoever thought of putting the buttons controlling the windows in a GMC truck on the top of the arm rest never had a dog!



Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston were supposed to be running the extreme day trip today. I knew it was going to be good weather but I could not convey that knowledge to enough anglers to make the trip pay. Alas, we could only generate interest with two. And that interest wasn't strong enough to make them really excited about the weather being good enough, in their minds (or my wife's), to get others to go. So, again, the Bunny Clark sets sad and lonely with the wooden anchors out for yet another day, a common theme this spring.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 49F, the sky was overcast, it had just stopped raining at 4:30 AM, there was little or no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good. By 7:30 AM, most of the clouds had cleared away, the streets were drying out and the day had a summer-like feel to it. By 9:30 AM, it was a beautiful cool summer day. The sky was nearly cloudless. The sky stayed nearly cloudless all day. The visibility was very good to excellent. The air temperature reached a high of at least 68F. That was the highest air temperature I saw in Ogunquit. The wind blew out of the north at ten knots or so in the morning. By 11:00 AM, the wind had already hauled out of the southwest. The remainder of the day saw southerly winds. All winds were light today. The strongest wind was the northerly wind in the morning. Wind speeds were about five knots, more or less. The ocean was calm. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 48F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 61F with a low of 50F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 48F).

Today was a restaurant day. I spent the whole time thinking that I had to meet the boat when it came in, only to realize it was still at the dock. Old habits die hard. Because I kept planning my day around meeting the boat. Today was a typical day. I spent time talking to customers, ordering for tomorrow, printing order sheets, making donation decisions, advertising decisions and planning for the better weather coming. We have a few J1 visa students coming from eastern Europe. One of these students, who we had last season, is coming later (July) than planned. The agency that is responsible for getting her here could not find a place for her to stay. She is the only one. This because the others are arriving early enough in the year to find available housing. To make a long story short, I believe I found a way (with a little help from my friends) to hold a place for her to stay. It is going to cost us a little bit of money. But she is worth it. Essentially we have to secure the room by paying for the time she will not be there. The price is good so I thought; "What the hell." That was the only part of the day that was different than most Wednesdays.

A lot of my day was also planning where I was going to go fishing tomorrow. I am very excited about the prospects of tomorrow. With the wind change we could get a good pollock bite if I'm in the right place. It's also good for haddock. We shall see. I'm just excited to be going.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was clear, there was no wind ashore and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

It was quiet this morning as I got the boat ready to go fishing. A couple of anglers were getting ready there as well. The wind was very light from the west and all the stars were out. Later, as we were heading down the channel, making our way out to the fishing grounds, I had a better than average light because of a full moon over my right shoulder making it evident where the rocky points of land were located. I could also see the lobster buoys plainly. It was a calm ride to the fishing grounds. Seas were less than a one foot chop over fairly large rolling sea swells. The visibility was excellent.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at ten knots or so, more or less. Seas were chops of a foot or so over rolling sea swells from the southeast of eight to ten feet in the morning and six to eight later in the day. The wind increased to about fifteen knots with a two foot chop on the ride back to Perkins Cove. Sea swells were still six feet, at least. The sky was sunny all morning with high clouds arriving at noon. Clouds filled in around the edges but, even on the ride home, we could still see the sun. The lighting was soft and the seas were gray with white caps.. The air temperature never got above 54F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 50.1F. The visibility ranged to thirty miles. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing was excellent all day. It was a fish as cast from the moment we arrived until the time we headed for the barn. Most fish caught were cod, far and away. I may not have been able to keep track of all the cod between 6 pounds and 14.25 pounds but I came up with a figure of at least two-hundred and sixty-seven. We must have had half again as many under 6 pounds. This is at least the third time we have seen that this season. There were many between 9 and 12 pounds that I didn't weigh. Legal landings were good overall. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty haddock, two redfish, two cusk, three mackerel and four whiting. There were thirty-four sub-legal haddock released. We drift fished for most of the day but spent our time anchoring near the end. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't begin to tell you who was high hook. To be accurate you would have to include market cod. That would have been an impossible task. If you just included pollock and haddock, Alex Grenier (VT) was the man. He and his daughter, Alysha, went home with the most fillets today. Alex won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 19 pound pollock. This fish was caught as a double keeper catch with another pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. To date, this is the largest "double" of the Bunny Clark fishing season. I took a picture of Alex holding is two fish. This digital image appears in this entry on the left. His 19 pound pollock is tied for the fourth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. I also weighed a pollock of 11.25 pounds and a cod that weighed 11 pounds, both caught by Alex. Matt Lyon (VT) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. Some of his other fish included a 14 pound pollock, a 13 pound cod, an 11 pound cod and a 13.5 pound cod. Randy Lyon (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. The largest cod of Randy's that I weighed was 9 pounds. But I am sure he caught one over 11 pounds that I didn't weigh.

Other Angler Highlights: We had an anonymous Individual catch a 14 pound pollock, one of the bigger fish of the trip. He also caught a Maine state trophy whiting of exactly 3 pounds. I took a picture of this individual holding his prize. The digital image appears on the right. This ties for the largest whiting of the Bunny Clark season so far. Tony Atchinson (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock right off the bat this morning. That was before I realized that we were going to catch so many fish of 10 pounds or greater. Leum Fahey (VT) also caught a 10 pound pollock at about the same time. Ashley Stevens (VT) landed a pollock of 9.5 pounds. Chip Stevens (VT) boated a 15.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Ray Ash (VT) caught the largest cod of the day at 14.25 pounds. He had caught a 13 pound cod only moments before. Hunter Thompson (VT) also caught a 13 pound cod. J. Manning (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock and a 12 pound cod, two of his nicer fish. Alysha Grenier (VT) stayed fishing at the rail longer than anyone. The largest fish of hers that I weighed was a 12.25 pound cod. Willy Slattery (NH) caught an 11 pound cod. Justin "Yeti" Mason (VT) landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip. He never picked up a rod & reel, preferring to spend the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark! Ouch, that has to hurt! When we got to the dock he shook my and told me that this wasn't for him and that I would never see him on the Bunny Clark again. Actually, I wouldn't want to be here either if I felt that way.

I received two donations sponsoring me in my bicycle ride for a cancer cure/cancer care with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Both were anglers from the trip today. Alex Grenier (VT) and his daughter, Alysha, donated $40.00 while J. Manning (NH) gave $30.00. Thank you all so very much for your kindness and generosity. I very much appreciate your support!

Friday, June 9, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the annual Gary Hammond (all New York state) spring extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. Ashore, the sky alternated between overcast conditions and times when the sun would peek through. We had sun around noon. The sun was gone by 1:00 PM. A light rain started at 2:00 PM and continued for over an hour. It was so light as to be almost not raining. By 4:00 PM, the sun was out in a mostly blue sky. The sky remained clear and sunny until sunset. It never rained again. The air temperature hung around the 70F mark from noon into the afternoon. It felt warmer later when the sun was out. I didn't have access to a thermometer at that time. The wind was light and variable in direction all day. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 51F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at five to ten knots with seas in chops of a foot at most. This wind died out before noon. The wind was light and variable after that. The ocean was flat calm all afternoon. The air temperature rose to 60F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was overcast in the morning and clear and sunny in the afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 51F.

The fishing was excellent, very similar to yesterday's trip. Like yesterday, most fish caught were cod with a significant number of cod over five pounds. For the time spent fishing, the percentage of cod between 5 and 13.5 pounds was the same. Landings were very good. Unlike yesterday, most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Pollock came in second. Legal landings also included fourteen cusk, six mackerel and one whiting. They released a wolffish. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Chris Curtis and Gary Gonzo tied for high hook with fourteen legal fish each. If you included good sized cod, it would have been a mystery as to who caught the most fish. Logan Grant won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound cod. Logan's largest pollock weighed 9 pounds. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound cod caught by Chris Curtis. Chris also caught a 9 pound cod and an 8.5 pound pollock. Parker Groat, John Molica and Gary Ublacker all shared the title for angler with the third largest fish with a weight of 12 pounds. John's and Gary's were both cod. Parker's was a pollock. Gary's two largest pollock were both 10 pounds. Parker also caught a 10.5 pound cod and two pollock of 9.5 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: Collin Curtis caught a 9 pound cod, his best fish. Gary Hammond, Jr. caught a 10 pound cod, his best. T. J. Altomer did one slightly better with a 10.5 pound cod. Brian Simmons caught an 11 pound cod, his largest fish. Ryan Groat landed a 10 pound pollock. Gary Hammond, Sr. caught an 11.5 pound cod, his best. Daryl Van Vallenburgh released his 11 pound cod. Doug Groat landed the hard luck award for having the most tangled lines.

Gary Hammond, Jr. sponsored me with a generous $50.00 donation towards my bike ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge, an event to help find a cure for cancer. Thank you very much, Gary. Always a pleasure to have you and your crew aboard the Bunny Clark. I very much appreciate your thoughtfulness and generosity in the donation. All the best!

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in some haze. Ashore, it was a beautiful summer day. Winds were light, mainly from the south, all day. The ocean was calm. The air temperature got up to at least 75F in Ogunquit. The visibility was very good. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 52F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 85F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, it was much the same. The wind was south at about five knots all day. The ocean was calm with a two foot long rolling swell from the southeast. The air temperature made it up as high as 60F under the canopy top. The tide (current) was strong. The sky was sunny and clear. The visibility ranged to eighteen miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52.8F.

The fishing was very good. Again, there were a lot of cod. Jared counted seventy-six cod from 5 pounds to 12.5 pounds released. Landings were good. They could have been better had Jared been in the last area first. (But, of course, it could have been worse) The last area was excellent with mostly pollock. Legal landings included mostly pollock, sixteen haddock, four cusk, one whiting, one redfish and four mackerel. They released five dogfish. Drifting was the method. Cod flies caught the most fish.

Ian Croteau (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. He caught this pollock as part of a double keeper catch with another pollock of 12 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The "double" is tied with the Bunny Clark's third largest double of the fishing season to date. The 12 pounder tied for the Bunny Clark's third largest fish of the trip. Ron Croteau (ME) also caught a 12 pound pollock while Rick Eger (NH) caught a 12 pound cod. Ron caught two cod of 9 pounds each before he caught the pollock. Rick's second largest fish was an 8 pound cod. Lyn England (NH) caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 12.5 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Ernie Searles (NH) caught the second largest double of the day. His double included an 8 pound cod and an 11 pound cod. Maryann Pine (ME) landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer!

I received several donations sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Scott Trainor (MA) gave $25.00, Ralph Trotto (MA) gave $25.00 and Ron Croteau also gave $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and help. I very much appreciate it!

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 65F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the southwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in haze. Ashore, the most salient feature was the air temperature. It soared to 80F by 10:00 AM. By noon, it was 89F. The highest air temperature I saw today was 91F. By later morning, the wind had hauled out of the west and was blowing almost twenty-five knots in gusts. The visibility was good in haze. The sky was a mix of sun, clouds and hazy/milky sky conditions. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 91F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 58F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were about two feet, more or less, less when they first got to the fishing grounds. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The air temperature reached a high of 60F. The visibility ranged to ten miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 52F.

The fishing was excellent. In Ian's words; "As good as it gets." Most fish caught were cod from 6 to 13.5 pounds, over two hundred of these fish including a lot of doubles. Legal landings were very good, primarily because of all the pollock they caught. Most legal fish landed were pollock, by far. Legal landings also included twenty-one haddock (they had twenty-four sub-legal haddock), five cusk, ten mackerel and a herring. Released fish (besides the cod) included five dogfish and one wolffish. They drift fished for the first part of the day and anchored for the last part of the trip. It didn't much matter; the fishing was just the same on either discipline. All terminal gear worked well, it didn't matter what you used, bait, jigs or flies.

There was no way to tell high hook. Jim Hanatow (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 15 pound pollock. Some of his other good fish included a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. Matt Freitas (MA) caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. Ian also weighed an 11 pound cod and another pollock of 11 pounds for Matt. Third place (on fish size) was shared by Zack Freitas (MA) and Jamie Caper (MA) with a 13.5 pound fish. Zack's was a cod while Jamie's was a pollock. Zack also caught a 10 pound pollock and released a 10 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Linda Cooper (NH) caught a 10 pound pollock, her largest fish. Ethan Jackson (MA) also landed a 10 pound pollock. Jack Rivers (ME) landed a 12 pound pollock, his best. Steveo Stalia (NH) caught a 12 pound pollock. Robert Rivers (ME) released a 12.5 pound cod, his biggest fish. Shane Jackson (MA) boated an 11.5 pound pollock. Jacob Beckwith-Smith (NH) caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Landyn Traffas (NY) caught an 11 pound cod, his biggest fish. Jay Chenard (ME) was high hurler today. For this he landed the hard luck award t-shirt.

I received one donation sponsoring me in my cancer cure bike ride called the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donor was none other than Captain Steve McGrath (NH), a regular donor to my cause. I believe he started donating the year I started doing it in 2007. Since then I have just about raised $270,000.00. Thank you all! Steve's donation amount was $50.00. Thank you, Steve, for your gift to those who really appreciate it!

Monday, June 12, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 71F, the sky was mostly clear, there was no wind at the house and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in haze.

I wasn't in Ogunquit today. I drove down to Plymouth, Massachusetts last night for a (Federal) Recreational Advisory Panel meeting that was slated to start at 9:00 AM. At the time the Bunny Clark was leaving the dock I was talking to Frank Blount, the Chair of the RAP (and owner of the Francis Fleet, Point Judith, RI), over a cup of coffee at the Hilton Garden Inn.

Ashore in Ogunquit, I heard that the weather was a bit too warm, the wind was light from the west, the visibility was good in haze and the sky was a mix of sun and clouds. When I got home today at 5:00 PM, the air temperature in Ogunquit was 89F. I don't know if it was warmer earlier. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 89F (with a low of 66F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 95F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 97F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature of 97F in Concord today breaks the old record for this date of 94F set in 1973.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm over rolling sea swells of about two feet. The air temperature reached a high of 68F, a new high temperature for this season on the fishing grounds. The tide was strong. The visibility ranged to ten miles or less haze. The sky was sunny and mostly clear. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55F.

The fishing was excellent. It was even better than yesterday. The same number of cod were released from 6 to 14 pounds as they did yesterday. But the pollock bite was even better than yesterday and better than that as the day progressed! So landings were just shy of excellent. There were more market cod than there were pollock but there were more pollock than on yesterday's trip. Most legal fish landed were pollock. Legal landings also included eleven haddock and four mackerel. Besides the cod, released fish included one wolffish and four dogfish. Drifting was the only method employed. Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish by far.

Today we had a clear high hook angler, without question. Even I could tell from the number of bags of fillets he walked off the boat with. It was Marty Buskey (NY). Marty also released the largest cod of the trip and the second largest fish overall at 14 pounds. His largest pollock weighed 11.5 pounds. Jack Henke (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 17.5 pound pollock. He told me that he hadn't seen fishing like this since he went on a Cashes Ledge trip in 1983. So you know that if Jack, a regular angler of ours for many years, says that, it must have been super! The third largest fish was shared by three anglers at 12 pounds each. These anglers included Jason Bare (NY) who had two pollock of 12 pounds each, Bob Mayer (ME) who landed a 12 pound cod (and a 10.5 pound cod) and Debi Bare (NY) who also caught (and released) a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Bob Audler (IN) caught a 10.5 pound pollock and an 11.5 pound cod, his two best fish. John Russell (ME) caught a 10 pound cod. Ken Johnson (VT) landed a 10 pound pollock, his best fish. Art Carlucci (VT) boated an 11 pound pollock, his best. And Debi Bare showed up again as the hard luck award recipient. Why? Because every angler aboard was tangled up with Debi at some point during the trip! The tangles weren't hard to clear as her monofilament was a bright green. I'm sure she picked that color because green is my favorite color. Ian may see that line in his sleep tonight!

I received another donation from Marty & Elise Buskey today for $25.00. This to support my cancer fund raising ride with the Pan-Mass Challenge. This is either the second or third time they have given me the gift of a better future for those with the dreaded disease. And they have donated to my cause for years before. Thank you both so very much for the support. It's a great feeling to have people like yourselves behind me on this!

As for the RAP meeting in Plymouth, Frank Blount, the Chairman, ran the meeting along side Dr. Jamie Cournane, the lead groundfish fishery analyst for the New England Fishery Management Council. I have to say that Dr. Cournane has been extremely good keeping the RAP on track along with Frank, who has spent so many years with the Council (eighteen!), that it ligitimizes the importance of adding our voice to the Council and on to the National Marine Fishery Service (NMFS). I find myself looking at those two leading the meeting and thinking how lucky we are to have them.

The meeting started at 9:00 AM and went straight through lunch and ended at 2:00 PM. Frank and Jamie, after discussing the agenda, thought it would be a good idea to push straight through lunch so the drive through Boston wouldn't be as bad for some of us. I was very grateful for that. Not only do I hate the traffic and the time it takes to get home through it. But I am a terrible driver. Never mind texting, the radio is enough of a distraction that I have to have that turned off when I get behind the wheel. That's not how I drive at home. But in new more populated places I get nervous. So I was very pleased to be able to get home in time to meet the Bunny Clark as she barely kissed the float under Captain Ian's pilotage. I managed to get by a crash where one vehicle burst into flames, just like in the movies. And I managed to miss pieces of rubber and debris when a tire exploded on an eighteen wheeler right in front of me going through Boston. How I didn't get hit by braking cars and stuff flying off that truck I will never know. Close but no cigar, thankfully!

The subject of the meeting was important and worth mentioning but not in detail. Many motions were made to be pushed forward to the Council's Groundfish Committee. The RAP wants to evolve into it's own committee so the recreational angler has a stronger voice. I supported that motion. We made motions to improve regulation stability. In other words, we want the regulations for the recreational angler to remain the same, ideally, for a period of years instead of wonder what the regulations will be a week before the season starts. We addressed the high percentage of error (PSE) associated with gathering recreational landings data under the Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP). And that we, as a body, are very uncomfortable with MRIP using flawed data with a high PSE that is used to regulate our fishery. In any other data set those figures would be considered outliers and thrown out. We talked about future Council priorities as it relates to us, future fish stock assessments, the halibut and it's role as it relates to regulation in our fishery, the frequency of RAP meetings taking place in the future, some house cleaning items, the Carlos Rafael indictment with it's stock disabling implications along with the parceling out of the fish & fishing permits and the recreational management measures process in general. In all, I thought it was our best meeting to date.

The question of this years regulations were also a topic. I believe the new regulations will come out by July. They will include a continuation of the no cod possession, the same length limit on haddock, a new bag limit for haddock of twelve per person and a period of no haddock possession from September 17th until the end of October. I don't expect this to change but stranger things have happened.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 75F, the sky was clear, there was no wind ashore and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

It was hard to get used to the fact that I could come down to the boat at 2:00 AM in a t-shirt like it was the middle of the summer. This after so many mornings in a row of 40 to 50 degree temperatures in the morning. Getting used to sleeping wasn't the best. But the work and little sleep I got the night before helped to prepare me. And I was appreciative of the fact that the Stanley Cup final game was the night before!

The ride to the fishing grounds was uneventful. We had a, mostly, full moon above the horizon in back of us lighting the way down the short channel to the gate, a calm ocean for the whole ride and better than good visibility. Winds were light out of the southwest and the air temperature dropped into the middle 60s by the time we had reached our destination. I never changed out of a t-shirt the whole day, a first for this season.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to almost fifteen knots. Seas were chops of two feet at most. We had a chop of a foot to start, an increase in the southwest wind to fifteen knots, an elevated chop and a diminishing wind and sea state throughout the morning. By noon, the wind was very light with seas in chops of less than a foot. The wind finally flunked out altogether, leaving us with a calm ocean. It was flat calm heading home until we ran into a light northwest wind about ten miles from Perkins Cove. The sun was out in a hazy sky with some clouds and limited visibility on the ocean. The range of visibility was somewhere between four and eight miles in haze. The visibility improved greatly with the wind shift on the way home. The air temperature reached a high of 71F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.6F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 91F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 95F with a low of 72F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 93F (with a low of 62F).

The fishing was very good overall. Landings were good to very good. Most good sized fish caught were cod. But I believe I avoided the larger schools of market cod we have found this last seven days. Cod numbers (fish from 6 to 20 plus pounds) dropped to a value just shy of one-hundred and fifty. Most legal fish landed were pollock. But it was a good haddock day too, the best we have seen in a week or so. There were a few more legal haddock today than sub-legal haddock, also unusual as compared to the last seven days. And the haddock were bigger. Legal landings also included eight redfish, seven cusk, fourteen mackerel and a small monkfish. Released fish, besides the cod, included twenty dogfish, a season high, and a wolffish. I mixed up the boating method between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well but it was hard to tell as every hook that went into the water today was loaded with clam (bait). Even clams on most treble hooks on the bottom of the jigs! And, yes, it made no difference with me suggesting a "better way"!

Neither Ian nor I could discern who was high hook. Dave Harris (MA) would probably get my vote. But Marcin Korszen (NJ) probably did just as well. I would have been able to figure it out if we could have kept cod. Dave won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, an 18.75 pound pollock. I also weighed a 10 pound pollock and an 11 pound cod for Dave. For Marcin, I weighed a pollock of 12.25 pounds and a 10.25 pound cod that he caught. Raymond Charles (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 26 pound Maine state trophy pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's largest pollock of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Ray holding his trophy. This digital image appears on the left. Ray also caught another pollock of 13 pounds and a cod that weighed 14.25 pounds. The third largest fish was a 17 pound pollock caught by Bob Noddin (ME). Bob caught this fish as part of a double keeper catch that also included a 13 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time! To date, this is the Bunny Clark's second largest double keeper catch of the season. I also weighed a pollock of 11.5 pounds that he caught earlier in the trip.

Brian Plasse (ME) should probably have won one of the two pools today. He brought a cod to the surface that was over 20 pounds. The cod was caught with the treble hook of his jig squarely in the corner of it's mouth. So I leaned over and grabbed the jig, expecting to haul the fish over the side. Just before I was to get it completely free of the water, the fish rolled and broke the hook off the end of the jig. I was left holding the jig with no treble hook and, thus, no cod! I could have gaffed it, of course, but it's illegal to keep them. But I was really sorry I couldn't have weighed it as it would have been one of the top three cod of our season. Brian caught three other cod that I weighed including a 15 pounder, a 12 pounder and an 11 pounder.

Other Angler Highlights: Fourteen year old Erin Harris (MA) landed the largest double of day today. Her double included a 16.5 pound pollock and a 14.5 pound pollock. Not only did she bring the double to gaff by herself, she held the two fish up for a picture by herself and then waited holding the two pollock (one in each hand) until I took eight more! [This girl is very athletic and plays on two soccer teams at home!] This digital image with her father, Dave Harris, in the background, appears on the right. The double is the largest double caught this season on the Bunny Clark to date. I weighed a 10 pound pollock for her earlier in the day. Charlie Harris (MA) caught a 16.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. He also caught a 10 pound cod and a "pee-wee monkfish". Russell Watson (ME) caught a 16 pound pollock, his largest fish. Two other fish of Russell's that I weighed included a pollock of 14.5 pounds and a pollock of 10 pounds. Joe Columbus (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. He also caught one of the biggest haddock of the day at 3.5 pounds. His daughter, Cindy, fished right next to him and just missed landing a pollock of 10 pounds. Tim Pedersen (MA) caught the most haddock. Actually, he caught the most good sized haddock. Brian probably caught the most legal/sub-legal haddock today. Tim's three best haddock weighed 3.5 pounds, 4 pounds and 6 pounds. Barry Adams (ME) landed a 13 pound pollock and a 4 pound haddock, his two best fish. Eddie Robichaud (ME) caught the largest haddock of the trip, a 6.25 pounder! The hard luck of the day award was won by Bob Noddin. Don't ask!

I received several donations sponsoring me in my bicycle ride (for a cancer cure) with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The anglers and their donations are as follows: Elizabeth McLaughlin (NY) gave a very generous $500.00, Raymond Charles gave $25.00, Charlie Harris gave $25.00, Bob Noddin gave a generous $50.00 donation, Tim Pedersen donated $30.00 to the cause and Joe & Cindy Columbus donated another $20.00 bill to help me yet again this year. Thank you all so very much for your understanding, your support, your generosity and your kindness. My thank yous mean nothing compared to the thanks from those with the disease. But it's very comforting to me to know that you believe as I do. I very much appreciate that!

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston hosted the annual spring Tom Bruyere & The St. Lawrence River Rats (all New York) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 62F, the sky was clear, there was no wind, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good. Ashore, it was a perfect day. The wind, what little there was, started out of the west, died out and then blew lightly out of the south. The ocean was calm along the shore all day. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility over the ocean was very good. The air temperature was perfect, reaching a high of at least 74F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 55F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew from the north at five knots or less, died out to flat calm and then hauled out of the southeast at five knots or less. The ocean was flat calm all day. The air temperature rose to a value of 65F in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and brilliantly sunny. The surface water temperature reached a new high of 59F.

The fishing, the catching and landings were excellent. Most fish landed today were legal pollock, by far, and well over the cod count, for once. Cod came in at one hundred and six fish from 5 pounds to 11 pounds. Of course, all the cod were released. Legal landings also included a halibut, twenty-three haddock, twelve mackerel and a cusk. Released fish, besides the cod, included eleven dogfish and a wolffish. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't have possibly known who was high hook. They shared all the fillets and the fishing was that good. Lee Sovie won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 36 pound halibut. This is the largest halibut that has been landed on the Bunny Clark this season so far and only the third legal halibut this year. Captain Ian took a picture of Lee holding is prize. This digital image appears on the left. This is the Bunny Clark's eighth halibut of the season. Tom "Ollie" Bruyere led the boat pool for almost the whole day with a 19 pound pollock. This pollock became the second largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was a 15 pound pollock caught by Pete Backus.

Other Angler Highlights: Jon Benny landed a 12 pound pollock, his best fish. Rich Mallott caught the largest haddock at 4 pounds. His largest fish was a 13 pound pollock. Mike Kotash boated a 13 pound pollock, his largest fish. Andrew Bruyere landed a 14 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. Bob Williams caught a 12 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and the largest cod of the day at 11 pounds. He also landed the hard luck award for the most tangled lines! Ouch, that has got to hurt, particularly with Ollie aboard to remind him of it!

Ashore we hosted a large part of the former President, George H. W. Bush, family. Number 41 himself was there as well as his former First Lady, Barbara, and former President, George W. Bush's, First Lady, Laura Bush. Neil Bush and his family were there as well as his sister, Doro. Jebby Bush was also aboard while his father was still in Florida working in the business! But it was a great time. Number 41 came by boat as well as most of the family. Barbara came via SUV. Because of the fact that two families have Secret Service protection, there were many more individuals from the Secret Service than is normal. It was a very good time. President George is now 93 years old. But, I have to say, he looked better than he did last year or the year before. I shook his hand at least four times. It was good to see him. As they were wheeling him into his service van to go home (he left by land vehicle), he beckoned to me. I ran over and shook his hand a last time; "We'll be back," he said. And off he went!

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was clear, a half moon was hanging over the horizon, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good, at least.

I was glad to be back to more reasonable temperatures going down to the Bunny Clark this morning. Everything else about the morning was perfect. There was no wind, the sky was clear, the ocean was flat calm, the moon gave us enough light to see down the full length of the channel and the visibility was excellent.

The ride to the fishing grounds was easy, almost too easy. The ocean was flat calm. We saw a glorious sunrise. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature was perfect.

On the grounds, the ocean stayed calm for most of the morning. By later morning, we had a light southeast breeze come up. This wind steadily increased as the day progressed. The wind became established out of the south by early afternoon. By the time we were ready to head back, the wind had increased in velocity to fifteen knots. We had more than that going home and seas in chops of three feet, more or less. The sun shone in nearly a cloudless sky all day. The visibility ranged to thirty miles, at least. The air temperature reached a high of 64F in the shade. The tide (current) was strong for most of the day, moderate in the late afternoon.. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58.5F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 68F (with a low of 47F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 45F).

The fishing, and landings were very good overall. We had some excellent spots and we had some good spots. Most fish caught were legal pollock, by far. I was able to stay away from the cod somewhat but we still released eight-five cod from 5 to 12.25 pounds. Legal landings also included forty-nine haddock, three redfish, ten cusk, thirty-nine mackerel, our first white hake (a very small one) and two whiting. Released fish included sixty-two sub-legal haddock, a wolffish and six dogfish. We drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. Greg Martinez (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. There was a tie for second place at 14 pounds. Jim "Chip" Chiapponi (CT) and Pat Scanlon (MA) each caught 14 pound pollock. Chip caught his early in the morning while Pat caught his later in the day. Chip also caught a 2.5 pound Maine state trophy redfish. I took a picture of Chip on the bow holding this fish. His digital image, holding said fish, appears on the right. This is the largest redfish of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far! I can't remember when I have ever seen a redfish with so much girth. I also weighed an 11 pound pollock for Pat.

Other Angler Highlights: For once, Ken Carter (ME) didn't win the boat pool. He did catch a bunch of haddock, though. Bob Tassinari (MA) caught a 10 pound cod, his best fish. Wobby Barnes (MA) caught an 11 pound cod and managed to tangle with everyone in a radius of ten feet! Matt Malloy (VT) caught the best double keeper catch of the trip. His double included a 12 pound cod and a 12.25 pound cod, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. I also weighed an 11 pound cod for Matt. Tyler Barnett (VT) caught a 10.5 pound pollock, his largest fish. Jon "Griff" Griffin (MA) tied Matt for the biggest cod of the day at 12.25 pounds. Dan Bingell (MA) boated a 13 pound pollock, the fourth largest fish of the trip. I also weighed an 11 pound pollock for Dan. Jamie Ramsdell (MA) caught a 10 pound cod, his best. Brian Kett (MA) caught a 12 pound cod, his biggest fish of the day. Chuck Lennon (MA) boated a 10 pound pollock. He also landed the hard luck award for losing three jigs, all on big fish!

I received several donations today sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising event called the Pan-Mass Challenge, a bicycle ride across the state of Massachusetts to support the efforts of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Jimmy Fund. The anglers and their donations are as follows: Bob Cary & Janet Nussmann for a very generous $200.00, Ken Carter for $25.00, Bill & Michele Hazlett (MA) for a generous $50.00, Chip Chiapponi for $40.00, Bob Tassinari (MA) for $30.00 and Jamie Ramsdell (MA) for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for the support and help. I do appreciate it!

Friday, June 16, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, a very light rain was falling, the wind was very light out of the south and the visibility over the ocean was very good. Ashore, the sky was overcast all day. The morning saw a very light periodical spitting rain that was never enough to get the ground wet or to even turn the wiper blades on to clear the windshield. You could smell the rain. It finally started raining at 3:00 PM and continued, sometimes heavy, into the night. When I left the restaurant at 10:00 PM, the rain had stopped. I saw 62F as a high air temperature in Ogunquit. The wind remained out of the south and gradually increased to fifteen knots, more or less, by noon. The visibility deteriorated to good by mid morning, fair to good in fog/haze during the late afternoon. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 61F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the sky was overcast for the trip. It didn't start raining until they were half way home on the return ride to Perkins Cove. The air temperature reached a high of 65F. The visibility ranged to ten miles or more in haze. The wind blew out of the southeast at ten knots, more or less. Seas were two to three feet in a chop/swell combination. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good today. I suppose I should say that the catching was excellent as, like most trips this year, the market cod bite was phenomenal. Most good sized fish caught today were not cod, however. Pollock was the most prevalent species landed today. All of good size. In fact, there were no sub-legal pollock caught. Market cod came in a close second. We don't keep cod so the count is harder to validate, as it always is when that many fish are being returned by everyone who catches one. Legal landings also included quite few more haddock than we have been seeing and six mackerel. We had our most dogfish caught (and returned) today. The count was twenty-five. Two wolffish were also returned. Drifting and anchoring were both utilized. All terminal gear worked well.

Jon Griffin (MA) and Scott Trainor (MA) tied for high hook. In fact, Scott also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. This also makes him the fisherman of the day. His first fish over 10 pounds was an 11 pound pollock. Don Russell (NH) caught the second largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. The third largest fish was a 13.5 pound pollock caught by Jon Griffin. Griff also caught a pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jim LeMay (ME) led the boat pool for a while with a 10 pound pollock. He then led the pool again with a 12 pound pollock. David Ritchie (VT) landed an 11 pound pollock. Bill Murphy (NH) landed the hard luck award by pulling a Chuck Lennon: losing three jigs!

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Captain Jared Keniston and Anthony Palumbo ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was overcast, it was not raining, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was fair/good in haze/fog. We had haze and fog around most of the morning. The fog and haze were gone before noon. The sky remained overcast all day. At one point we saw an image of the sun through the clouds. But it was only a tease. The wind was light and variable. The ocean was calm. The highest air temperature I saw was 68F. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 56F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 69F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 72F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east southeast at ten knots, more or less. The ocean was fairly calm with a three to five foot rolling sea swell. The sky was overcast all day or appeared so. The tide (current) was strong. The air temperature reached a high of 58F under the canopy in the shade. The visibility ranged to a quarter of a mile in fog and then opened up to about five miles, late morning/early afternoon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 55.3F, decidedly cold for this time of year.

The fishing was very good, the catching was nearly excellent and landings were good. Most good sized fish landed were cod today but legal pollock were close behind. Legal landings also included thirty-four haddock (they had about the same number in sub-legal haddock as well), two cusk and fourteen mackerel. Released fish, besides the cod, included only nine dogfish. Drifting was the method. Cod flies caught the most fish today.

I was not informed with respect to high hook status or who was even close. There was a lot going on. Cody Paradis (MN) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 12.5 pound cod caught by Scott Trainor (MA). Louis Lamphere (VT) caught the third largest fish, a 12 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Nick Foster (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock, the largest pollock of the trip. Josh Stone (MA) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 10 pound cod. Marty Sepko (CT) caught all the biggest haddock today. He was amazing, as usual. Jared did not weigh any of his bigger haddock. His largest fish was a 10.5 pound cod. [I wrote this and uploaded this to the Internet but only realized today (June 19th) that the man with all the big haddock was actually Marty Latulippe (VT). It was Marty Latulippe that was amazing as usual and it was Marty Latulippe with the bigger haddock that weren't weighed by Captain Jared! Marty Sepko did catch the 10.5 pound cod.] Justin Nano (MA) got sea sick and took the shirt today.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky appeared overcast, the roads were dry, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. Shore, the fog lasted between 9:00 AM and 10:00 AM before backing off and moving offshore. The sky remained overcast until noon when the sun came out and remained out for the rest of the day in a mostly clear sky. The air temperature rose to a value of at least 79F in Ogunquit. The air was humid and warm before it warmed up to the full extent of the day, because of this humidity. The wind blew out of the south at ten knots or more all day. Although Ogunquit Beach cooled a bit with the onshore breeze, Perkins Cove remained warm long into the night. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F (with a low of 60F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 87F (with a low of 66F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind, in the morning, blew out of the south at five to ten knots. The ocean's surface was smooth under a sea swell of two to three feet. By noon, the southerly wind had increased to ten and fifteen knots. Seas increased in chops to two feet over the existing sea swell. The air temperature rose to a value of 64F at it's highest point. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was overcast the whole time they were on the grounds. This isn't surprising as it was also foggy the whole time they were on the fishing grounds, foggy enough that even if there was sun you would not have known. The visibility ranged to a quarter of a mile or less. Mostly it was much less. The surface water temperature reached a high value of 58F.

The fishing, catching and landings were very good overall. It was a great day. Most fish caught were legal, good sized, pollock. Cod took second place with seventy fish between 5 and 13.5 pounds. Legal landings included quite a few haddock, two cusk and two mackerel. They released the most dogfish we have seen this season with a count of thirty. A wolffish was also caught and released. They drift fished and anchored. All terminal gear worked well; it didn't matter what you used.

I asked Ian who might have been high hook. He couldn't know; everyone was very successful today. Max Sokolova (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. He also caught the second largest fish of the trip, a 13.5 pound cod. This was the largest cod caught today. Max also landed the largest double keeper catch today. His catch included an 11 pound pollock and an 8.5 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The third largest fish was a 13 pound pollock caught by Kerryn Morel (NH). She also caught a pollock that weighed 10.5 pounds. And she landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting sea sick. Apparently she was the only one?

Other Angler Highlights: Scott Foss (ME) caught the first fish to be weighed, a 10 pound cod. Lina Sokolova (MA) caught an 11 pound cod, her largest fish. Alec Adams (ME) also caught a significant cod of 10.5 pounds.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was clear (a crescent moon could be seen hanging over the ocean an hour earlier), the wind was blowing out of the south at light speeds and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog that wasn't quite along the shore line. Ashore, the fog hung around until, maybe, 9 or 10:00 AM. Then it backed off well away from shore. It never backed off enough to give even good visibility over the ocean, the good visibility was only had along the shore line. The sky was sunny for most of the morning and into the afternoon. There was a line of thunder showers to the west that kept moving northeast. They never did touch the coastal areas. After 5:00 PM, the sky became thinly overcast with a sun showing through the clouds. The sky cleared after that. The wind blew out of the south at fifteen knots most of the day but increased in velocity after 5:00 PM. At 6:00 PM, the wind was blowing out of the south at twenty knots sustained with higher gusts. The air temperature in Ogunquit reached a high of at least 82F. It was very humid as well making it feel warmer than it was. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 81F (with a low of 65F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 70F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 69F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south southwest at fifteen knots and, later, twenty knots with seas in chops of four to six feet. Ian told me the chops just got steeper near the end of the trip. The air temperature reached a high of 62F under the canopy in the shade. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a sixteenth of a mile to a half mile in fog. The sky was overcast or seemed so, all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was good, at best, with the sea conditions the way they were. The catching was very good overall. The landings were good to very good. Most fish caught over 5 pounds were cod, by far. That made it hard to get the fish you could keep. There were seventy-five cod released between 5 pounds and 15 pounds. Legal landings were mostly pollock. Legal landings also included forty-five haddock and one mackerel. Twelve dogfish were released. They drift fished for one stop but anchored for every stop afterward. All terminal gear worked well.

Seth Greenwood (NY) was the fisherman of the day. He caught the most legal fish and market cod and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound pollock. This pollock is tied with Keith Wells (NY) for the second largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. Captain Ian took a picture of Seth holding his big pollock. This digital image appears on the left. [Seth is sporting my new theme t-shirt that Ocean Graphics and I design to commemorate the new season of the Pan-Mass Challenge. I have been coming up with a new shirt every year, the theme different on every one. This years theme is "Celebrating the Success of the DFCI". My motif is on every new shirt, a fish riding a bicycle. The last few years I have been accused of producing a shirt that was too feminine. So for this years shirt I chose to include what I perceive as darker, gender neutral colors. Did I succeed?] Seth tied with Mark Weldon (NH) for the second largest fish of the trip at 15 pounds. Seth's fish was a pollock while Mark's fish was a cod. Seth also caught a 14 pound cod and a 10.5 pound pollock. Mark also caught a 10.5 pound cod, a 13 pound cod and an 11 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Dan Bailey (NY) caught a 12 pound pollock, his largest fish. Bill MacVeigh (NY) caught, by far, the most haddock. Ian didn't have a count. Jimmy Wilson (NY) landed the hard luck award getting sea sick. He might have been the only one!

I received a nice $50.00 donation sponsoring me in my cancer fund raising ride (cycling event) with the Pan-Mass Challenge. It was from a woman, Lynn Burkitt Welsch (NM), with whom I had some of my best cycling adventures in the mid '70s. She lives in New Mexico now but visits Maine, usually, every year. When she does visit, she always stops to say hello to me. And, of course, it brings back memories I will treasure until I am unable to remember anymore. Her donation is in memory of Karen Clark. Thanks so much, Lynn. It was great to see you today. I so much appreciate your support. All the best until the next time around.

Not so Tim Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and I were supposed to be running the marathon trip today. Alas, we had only one angler interested! So the wooden anchors secured the Bunny Clark in Perkins Cove today! I missed being out there!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was good along the shore but fair to poor further out into the ocean with fog and haze. Ashore, where I was all day, the air temperature rose to unreasonable levels for a person who is has been used to fifty degree temperatures all spring. At one time I looked at the thermometer in Ogunquit (it was up town) and it was 84F. But it was also very humid today. And the wind didn't help. It blew out of the south at ten to twelve knots, hardly enough to blow out a candle. By 2:00 PM, the wind was done. It had flunked out and hauled out of the southwest at very light speeds. The sky was partly cloudy for most of the morning. By late morning and early afternoon, we had a series of rain showers go by. There was little or no wind and no lightning associated with the showers. It looked like it was going to rain forever at the time. But the rain had cleared out by 2:00 PM leaving the rest of the day dry and sunny with very few clouds. It was a great afternoon to have a rum punch and steamers on the deck of Barnacle Billy's. The visibility went from fair in the early part of the morning to very good by 3:00 PM. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 64F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 60F).

I spent the whole day working off a list of things I needed to complete that I started over two weeks ago. I started at the desk at 3:00 AM and worked at home (with an hour "break" working at the desk at Barnacle Billy's, Etc.) until 11:00 AM. From there I drove through the various rain showers picking up oil at NAPA, Jinkai fishing line from Saco Bay Tackle Company and various other things I needed. I was on the phone constantly, ordering, signing up anglers for the two invitational summer trips and solving issues that had been on my mind for a while when I didn't have time to tackle them. I got back to Ogunquit around 2:00 PM.

For the rest of the day I worked on the Bunny Clark's engine. Most of the time was spent sleuthing out a reverse gear oil leak that has been bugging me for almost a week. It was a good thing I didn't run the trip today as I would have had to deal with the problem offshore. I would have solved it out there as I had the materials aboard to fix it. But the period of discovery might have taken longer even though the assets to fix it would have been narrowed down. Here, I was able to get extra parts to have aboard in case it happens again. The problem was a faulty "O" ring on the reverse gear sender. I change the gear oil regularly so it's very clean and very hard to see when there is a leak. So I had to clean everything completely before I started the engine to look to see where the leak was. It took time. And I had some running around to do to find the right sized "O" ring to replace it. Had it happened offshore, I would have taken the "O" ring off the spare sender I keep aboard for emergency purposes. Between all this and changing a few filters I had planned to do today anyway, I finished up around 8:45 PM.

I never was able to check all the items off the list I was working on today.



The sender is the gold fitting in the center of the digital image.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston and Captain Jared Keniston ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, there was much less humidity, the sky was mostly clear, the wind was very light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least. Ashore, the wind blew mostly out of the west and then northwest. Wind speeds were in the fifteen knot range most of the day. The sky was mostly clear with a bright sun. There was less humidity all day. The highest air temperature I saw was 82F in Perkins Cove. But the lack of humidity made it a perfect day. The visibility remained very good. The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 61F). In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 57F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five to ten knots in the morning and ten to fifteen knots in the afternoon. Seas were about two feet overall in kind of a chop/swell deal. The air temperature reached a high of 64F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The fishing was very good, the catching was very good and landings were good to very good overall. Most good sized fish caught were cod. There were one hundred and forty-six cod caught and released from 5 to 12 pounds. This is the most market cod we have seen in a week. Most legal fish landed were pollock, followed closely by haddock. Legal landings also included eight cusk and twenty-four mackerel. Released fish included the same number of haddock that were kept and the most dogfish we have seen this season so far, on one trip, with a count of forty-seven. They drift fished all day. All terminal gear worked well. It didn't matter what you used; there was plenty of action.

The were fishing peacefully for quite a while as a sailboat, a sloop, bore down on them from the southwest. The boat was far enough away that Ian didn't pay attention. It became evident after a while that the sailboat was not going to change course and, in fact, was on a collision course with the Bunny Clark. The anglers started yelling as Ian ran to the helm to start the engine and put it in gear to get out of the way. Ian avoided a collision, but only barely. The sailboat had a light blue colored hull and was named the Noonin. The name was on the bow, which is unusual for a sailboat. He couldn't see the hailing port. And, from what I understand, the sail set was "wing & wing", going directly to leeward. There was no one at the helm until the last minute when someone showed up coming out of the companionway. I asked if he was fully clothed, all kinds of thoughts running through my head. And I guess he was. I would have given him the nod if he were half dressed. But fully dressed, that's just plain dumb seamanship!

Ian didn't mention who was high hook. Matt Savarie (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock caught by John Lambert, Jr. (NY). Rene Poirier (ME) caught the third largest fish, an 11 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Matt Wood (NY) caught the first fish to weigh, a 10.5 pound cod. His largest pollock weighed 10 pounds. Brien Bachon (NY) caught a 10 pound cod, his largest fish. Ben Armstrong (MA) caught a 10.5 pound cod, his best. Ben also landed the hard luck award for getting a touch of the mal de mer and for getting quite a few tangles.

I received two donations sponsoring me in Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money to fight cancer with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. One was a very generous donation of $250.00 from Hank/Henry Lapa (MA). I used to take his brother, Mitch, fishing with me all the time. Mitch liked the marathon trips. The other was a $40.00 donation from Bob Munroe & Linda Burgess (MA). Thank you all so very much for your help and generosity. I very much appreciate your support!

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Captain Ian Keniston I are running the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was clear, there was no wind and the visibility over the ocean was very good. More later.

We have room on near future fishing trips. The following include the dates and the availability of space aboard the Bunny Clark: The extreme day trip of Sunday, June 25, has two fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Monday, June 26, has fourteen fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Wednesday, June 28, has seventeen fishing spots available, the marathon trip of Thursday, June 29, has fifteen fishing spots available, the extreme day trip of Friday, June 30, has sixteen fishing spots available, the full day trip of Saturday, July 1, has twenty-three fishing spots available and the full day trip of Sunday, July 2, has nineteen fishing spots available. We can still keep fifteen haddock per person. This will continue to be the regulations until they change them. I have no idea when this will occur. If it continues long enough, we will also be able to keep cod in August. I doubt that these present regulations will remain in place for much longer but we shall see. There are a lot of fish around. There are less haddock than there have been, many many cod in the 6 to 12 pound range and better and good sized pollock have become the most prevalent species and most common pool winning fish. We have been seeing the occasional halibut. But you have to be there to catch the fish! To make a reservation you can call 207-646-2214.









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