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Bunny Clark Fishing Update

Written & Edited by Tim Tower

Wednesday, July 6, 2022, 7:00 AM EDT




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Our First Legal Halibut

The shot above is a digital image of the Bunny Clark's first legal halibut that was boated this year. Earlier in the season (on both a trip I captained and Captain Ian's trip) we had anglers who had hooked two other good sized halibut that were lost before we got a chance to see the fish. This one, a 116.5 pounder, was caught by Jake Higgins (MA) on a bare jig of his own creation on the marathon trip of June 14, 2022. The picture above shows the halibut, of course, with the team who helped get it into the boat. All of these guys either work on the ocean in the groundfishery or spend so much time on the ocean they may as well have a vocation there. From left to right, in three rows starting from the front, are Dan Lee (NH) with Mark Pray (MA) across from him, Ryan Tully (NH), Jake (in the middle), Gabe Marks (MA) and, in the back with the gray hoodie, Jay Parent (NH). The halibut was caught on a drift as a blind strike with no warning and no sign of any halibut chasing our drift as seen quite frequently on the sounding machine. It is such a gift to catch an Atlantic halibut and so rewarding to have the first one in the boat. By the way, this is Jake's first ever halibut. He caught his first ever fluke only a week before!




Thursday, June 2, 2022

Jon Calivas and I (with Nick Wixon scoping out the deck hand position) ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, it was drizzling rain, the wind was light out of the east and the visibility over the ocean looked good.

The ride to the fishing grounds was uneventful. Winds were light from the south southeast without a wind driven wave. We did have a left over two to three foot close swell left over from some wind offshore. The air temperature was mild. The visibility was good, at least. We did have an overcast sky. We also had occasional misty rain.

On the fishing grounds, we had light southeast wind, at first. The wind was more east southeast in the afternoon up to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot with an underlying two foot swell. We had an occasional drizzle. The visibility ranged from a mile to twenty miles in haze, drizzle and fog. The air temperature remained mild. The tide (current) was moderate and against the wind. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 52.8F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 65F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 51F).

The fishing was good to very good, depending. For over two hours we had no drift whatsoever. The current and the wind were opposing each other enough so that the boat would stay in the same position for twenty minutes. When we were drifting, the first two hours, the fishing was very good. It was barely good with no drift as we were held captive by the dogfish and the smaller fish. The catching was very good overall. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. They were mostly big framed fish. The haddock cull worked out to be five percent sub-legal. Most were well over the legal minimum size. Legal landings also included twenty-six pollock, thirteen redfish, fifty cusk, a monkfish and eight mackerel. There were five jigs lost to porbeagle sharks. Released fish included fifty dogfish, thirty-five cod of 5 pounds or more, about as many small cod, seventeen sub-legal pollock, the small haddock and a cusk or two. We drift fished all day. No one used bait today. Had we used bait, the boat's haddock bag limit would have been met and the dogfish would have been savage.

Dean Stevens (VT/AZ) was high hook with the most legal fish. For the first two hours he was non-stop. The last time he fished with me was five years ago. He was good then. I think he is better now. His dory mate, Karli Lucas (AZ/VT) was second hook. However, it was close enough that she might have caught as many as Dean. Regardless, they were standouts. Dean won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the fourth largest fish, a 12 pound monkfish. This is the Bunny Clark's largest monkfish of the season so far. I took a picture of Dean holding his monkfish along side Karli holding a 3.5 pound haddock that she caught on a jig. This digital image appears on the left. Karli also caught a 4 pound haddock and a 9 pound cusk. She lost her jig to a porbeagle shark later in the day.

Brandon Stevens (VT) caught the largest fish of the trip, a 13 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest cod this season to date. Brandon was not in the boat pool. It was the last fish caught on the trip today. Jacob Inkel (VT) won the boat pool for largest fish with the second largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. Jacob also caught the largest haddock of the trip at 5.5 pounds. And he tied for second largest haddock of the day at 5 pounds. There were five other haddock that weighed 5 pounds today. Dylan Stevens (VT) tied with Dean with a pollock that weighed 12 pounds. But the boat pool wasn't shared with Dean because Dylan didn't enter the boat pool. Dylan was another angler who caught a 5 pound haddock.

Other Angler Highlights: Brian Stevens (VT) caught the first fish that I could weigh for the boat pool, a 6 pound pollock. Cole Melendy (NH) boated a 9 pound cod right after that. Cole caught quite a few haddock, a full bag of just haddock by the end (and an assorted bag of other - including haddock). Eat your heart out Ryan McCarthy! Tony Atchinson (NH) caught an 8 pound cusk and was another who caught a 5 pound haddock. His largest fish was an 11.5 pound pollock. Normand Inkel (VT) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the only angler to actually hurl over the side! It only stopped him from fishing for the time it took to get the job done!

Friday, June 3, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas (with Nick Wixon as apprentice deck hand) hosted the Gary Hammond (all New York) extreme day trip charter today. Gary always brings a crew of angling heroes with him. Today was no exception.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 53F, the sky was overcast, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was fair in fog. It started misting around 7:00 AM and fog was held just offshore. At 8:45 AM, it started to pour. Rain was still coming down in buckets when I went to leave the restaurant to come back home on the scooter after working there since 5:30 AM. It rained for most of the morning. Sometimes it was light. Most times it was steady. A couple of times it came pouring down. After noon, it stopped. It never rained again. The wind blew lightly out of the east. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The visibility became very good after the rain passed. The fog started to depart when the rain came. The fog had stayed off the shoreline since 8:00 AM anyway. You could see the bank from the Cove until about 10:00 AM. The air temperature stayed below 60F all day, the highest air temperature that I saw being 57F. The sky was overcast. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 62F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 60F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 55F (with a low of 50F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the east at five knots to start, increasing to fifteen knots for the second half of the trip. Seas were chops of two to three feet. It rained in the morning, the wind started picking up as the rain was departing. The tide (current) was very strong today. The air temperature was the same as it was ashore. They were in the fog most of the day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to two miles or more as the day progressed. The sky was overcast all day. The water temperature reached a high of 52F.

The fishing was good; the dogfish, the current and the weather wouldn't allow me to bring it up into the very good category. The catching was nearly excellent. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. I'm sure more haddock would have been landed had there not been so many jigs used. The haddock cull was about ten percent sub-legal. Legal landings also included seventeen pollock, fourteen cusk, thirteen whiting and twenty-two mackerel. Released fish included about one hundred and fifty small cod, five cod of 5 pounds or more, fifty dogfish, the small haddock, a small pollock or two, a porbeagle shark and a couple mackerel. Drifting was most effective. Anchoring, although tried, gave them too much current on the lines and made them captive to the dogfish. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian was unsure who was high hook with the most legal fish. I do know that Gary Hammond, Jr. caught eighteen small cod before he caught his first haddock. Gary was fishing with a jig. Gary Ublacker won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. Logan Groat caught the second and third largest fish, both pollock and both 12 pounds each.

Other Angler Highlights: John Gallo caught an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Devin Scali caught the first fish that Ian weighed for the boat pool, an 8 pound pollock. Gary Hammond, Sr. landed the hard luck award t-shirt for losing two jigs.

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg hosted the Women Anglers/Women Hunters full day trip charter today. This is a Maine club. One of them gave me an iPhone so I could take a picture of the group while on the Bunny Clark just before they left for the fishing grounds. This digital image appears below. The trip was arranged by Christi Holmes.



At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 54F, the sky was overcast, the roads were wet, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was good in some haze. The roads dried up after a couple of hours. It never rained today. However, the sky remained overcast for the majority of the day. During the late afternoon, the clouds finally disappeared and it became a nice sunny day. Winds along the shore were light from the south, up to ten knots in the later afternoon. The ocean along the shore was calm for most of the day. It was hazy with a good visibility over it. The air temperature reached a high of 62F in Perkins Cove. It was a cool evening. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 54F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 60F (with a low of 52F).

On the fishing grounds, there was zero wind for the time they were fishing. The wind came up out of the south on the ride back to Perkins Cove. They did have a rolling sea swell of about two to three feet. The sky was overcast. The tide (current) was light. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged from three to ten miles in haze. The surface water temperature reached a high of 53F.

The fishing was nearly excellent. The weather was perfect, there was little current and there were few dogfish. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Only ten percent of all the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included thirteen cusk. Released fish included quite a few small cod, two cod of 5 pounds or more, the short haddock and a couple small pollock. They drift fished the whole day. Only baited hooks with six flies for all twenty-five anglers were used. And that was good enough!

Ian couldn't discern who was high hook. Jane McKenna won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 5.25 pound haddock caught by Claire DeWilde. Judy Collins caught the third largest fish, a 5 pound cod. And, yes, I was foolish enough to make a quip about her singing ability.

Other Angler Highlights: Julie Anderson caught a 4.5 pound haddock, the first fish that I could weigh for the boat pool. Tammy Boots landed a 4.75 pound haddock, her biggest fish. Nikki Kenefick landed the hard luck award for attaining high hurler status. Ouch!

Sunday, June 5, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg (with Nick Wixon as apprentice deck hand) ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 51F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten knots or more, died out and then hauled out of the southwest after noon. The visibility remained excellent. The sky was cloudless almost all day. The air temperature reached a high of 73F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 56F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 49F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at ten to five knots, went calm and then hauled out of the southwest at five to ten knots. The ocean surface was calm over rolling sea swells of two feet. The air temperature was warm. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was clear and sunny. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good with some excellent stops and some good to very good stops. Most legal fish landed were, you guessed it, haddock. A quarter of all the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included three pollock, five redfish, fourteen cusk, eleven whiting and twenty-five mackerel. Released fish included the short haddock, thirty-two dogfish, six cod of 5 pounds or more, ten short cod, a couple small pollock, a few porbeagle sharks and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well today.

Ed Martin (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. I walked aboard today and said hello to Dan Payne (ME) never realizing that Ed was there with him, as he normally is. So as a result, I never said hello to Ed in the morning and I didn't recognize him on the dock before he left! Bummer!

Brad Baker (OR) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. Emily Selmer (MA) caught the second and third largest fish of the trip, a 6.5 pound cod and a 6 pound cod. She also landed the hard luck award t-shirt for getting a porbeagle shark right up next to the boat, having the reel fall off the rod and, in the process, broke the handle of the reel, eliminating the possibility of boating the shark!

Other Angler Highlights: Steve Selmer (NH) landed the largest haddock at 5.5 pounds. He also gave my wife, Deb, a bag of haddock fillets. When I got home from working at the restaurant, I skinned the fillets and Deb fried up the haddock. Melt in your mouth fantastic. Nothing like fresh haddock. Nothing like fresh fish! Thanks so much, Steve!

Monday, June 6, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was clear, there wasn't enough wind to blow out a candle and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The wind was very light from the northwest, went dead calm about mid morning and then hauled out of the south at, maybe, ten knots. The sky was cloudless or nearly so all day. The visibility was excellent all day. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove was 70F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 75F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind had already died by the time they arrived. The ocean was calm with very little in the way of an ocean swell. Before noon, the wind came up out of the southwest at five knots. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was clear and sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The air temperature was very warm on the calm water in the sun. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F. The surface water has been wanting to warm up for a while. All we needed was a calm day to boost it up a bit.

The fishing was nearly excellent. The weather, the current and the dogfish were at a nearly perfect level of enjoyment. The catching was very good to excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Twenty percent of all the haddock caught were sub-legal and had to be released. Most anglers got their limit of haddock. But the boat's total bag limit was not met. Legal landings also included one pollock, ten cusk, five whiting and ten mackerel. Released fish included a very few small cod, the short haddock, fifty dogfish, two porbeagle sharks and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best today.

Anthony Palumbo (MA), one of my best former deck hands, was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a 4 pound cod, the third largest fish of the trip. Chris Tankred (OH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 6 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 5 pound cusk caught by Mark Laroche (VT).

Other Angler Highlights: Bill Suelke (PA) caught the largest haddock at 3.75 pounds. Riley Laverdiere (ME) landed the hardest luck of the day award for only landing one legal fish!

Tim Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Kai Rosenberg and I (with Nick Wixon as apprentice deck hand) ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was hazy clear, the wind was very light from the east southeast and the visibility over the ocean was very good in haze.

It was another easy ride to the fishing grounds. There was no wind for almost the whole ride out. The ocean was glassy over a hubbly rout. The rout was an old two foot sea that probably started as a wind driven chop.Still, it was a comfortable ride. The visibility was very good. The sky was hazy clear. The air temperature was 55F.

On the fishing grounds, the wind started out light from the south southwest. By noon, we had about ten knots of this wind. Seas were mostly chops of about a foot. Chops increased to two feet with an increase of fifteen knots just before we were to head home. The air temperature remained mild, 60F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was hazy clear with some clouds. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 55.8F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 81F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 73F (with a low of 53F).

The fishing was excellent. The weather was perfect, the drift was perfect, anchoring was perfect, there were very few dogfish and it was just very comfortable. The catching was very good to excellent. Landings were very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock followed closely by pollock. Legal landings also included thirty-one cusk and eight whiting. Released fish included ten dogfish, nine sub-legal haddock, thirty-two cod of 5 pounds or more, thirty small cod, nineteen small pollock and a wolffish about 8 pounds. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. All terminal gear worked well.

Fred Kunz (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. His largest fish was a pollock of about 11 pounds. Other fish of note included a 9.5 pound cod (the first fish of the day), a 10 pound cod and a double that included a 10 pound pollock and an 8 pound pollock, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. The double is the Bunny Clark's fifth largest double of the season so far. Russell "Rusty" Talbot (NH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season to date and the largest pollock that he has ever seen. This was Rusty's first deep sea fishing experience. He's an excellent fresh water fisherman. And he took to the jig stick like a duck to water. He also caught haddock to 5 pounds and another pollock I weighed that was 11 pounds.

Jordan Linton (OH) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish a 15 pound pollock. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's fifth largest pollock of the season so far. He also caught the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds. And, again, he landed the hard luck award for being the sole hurler of the trip. Had anyone else been sick today they would not have bested Jordan in the vocals department. Everyone knew he was sea sick!

The third largest fish of the trip was a 13.25 pound pollock caught by Chris Tankred (OH). Charlie Tankred (OH) came in at number four with a 13 pound pollock. He caught this fish as part of a double that also included a pollock of 10.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest double of the fishing season to date. I also weighed a 10 pound pollock and a 12.75 pound pollock for Charlie.

Other Angler Highlights: Sean Tankred (OH) caught the second largest fish I could weigh for the boat pool today. His fish was a pollock of 10.5 pounds. Sean caught a lot of fish today. Another fish of his that I weighed was a 9.5 pound pollock. He caught bigger pollock that I didn't weigh but weren't big enough to contest the pool. Jack Cadigan (MA) caught an 11 pound pollock. Erica Linton (OH) also caught an 11 pound pollock. Paul Pearson (NH) caught the Bunny Clark's largest cusk of the year so far at 10 pounds. Paul's largest pollock weighed 12 pounds. His largest haddock weighed 5 pounds. Bob Mayer (ME) caught the largest haddock of the day at 5.5 pounds. The largest pollock of his that I weighed was 10 pounds. He must also have caught bigger pollock. Bill Donnelly (MA) caught a 12.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Jeffrey Tankred (PA) released a 10 pound cod. He also caught some pollock that had to be 11 pounds. Victor Latek (MA) caught the second largest cusk at 9.75 pounds.

I received two donations sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Charlie Tankred gave me a generous $100.00 to the support cancer research while Paul Chontofalsky (PA) did the same with a donation of $50.00. Thank you both so very much for believing as I do; something has to be done to solve the cancer riddle. I appreciate your faith in me to find the fish and I certainly appreciate that you believe as I do that I'm doing the right thing for human kind. Above all I appreciate your thoughtfulness and generosity.

Wednesday, June 8, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

Because of the weather forecast, I gave everyone the opportunity to go another day, get a refund or back out altogether. A few decided to stay ashore leaving us with just over a half a boat of anglers. I didn't believe the National Weather Service was accurate in their portrayal of the day. And why should I? They aren't often very accurate. And, besides, neither I nor the NWS had today slated as a dangerously rough day. But, as I am reminded from time to time, perception is everything. But it's also the stuff of exciting future memories! "Remember when.......?"

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good in haze and precipitation. It continued to rain with the wind at fifteen knots with the occasional gust to twenty-five which, to me, meant it was blowing harder offshore. At Perkins Cove, the wind blew to over twenty knots for a couple of hours and then started to die out. By noon, the southerly wind was only ten knots. It stopped raining by 9:00 AM. From 8:00 AM until 9, the rain was intermittent. By 1:00 PM, the sun started to come out. It was sunny and 76F by 3:00 PM. It was also a bit humid, which I didn't expect. There was very little southerly wind by that time; maybe five knots? The visibility over the ocean was good in haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 81F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 59F).

The ride to the fishing grounds was rough. Ian told me this. And if "he" tells me it is rough, it's rough. The seas were from the southeast and, at times, about ten feet according to the sounding machine. On top of that there was a chop from the south that was four to six feet. The combination was not good for some. Most of the boat was okay with it, though.

On the grounds, the wind blew out of the south at twenty to twenty-five knots. But that didn't last. Wind speeds started to diminish and continued to do so as the day progressed. They started with four to six foot chops with the bigger swell. By noon, the wind had dropped to ten knots. Seas were two to four feet. The wind and seas were less for the last two hours of the day. Most said it was pleasant for the last two hours. The sky was overcast in the morning with some rain on the way out. The afternoon was sunny. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from a half mile to three miles in fog and haze. The air temperature was in the 50s to start, 60s after noon. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was fair. The seas and wind made it uncomfortable. The catching and landings were excellent, a fish a cast. Most legal fish landed were haddock, the bag limit easily attained. Twenty percent of all haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included a pollock, five cusk and nine mackerel. Released fish included four cod of 5 pounds, a dozen small cod, a couple small pollock, one dogfish (And I thought we were doing well yesterday!) and a mackerel. They anchored for most of the day but drifted near the end. Bait worked best.

Tim Rozan (ME) was high hook with the most legal fish. He was just shy of catching a third of all the fish boated today. His largest fish was a 7.5 pound pollock, the second largest fish of the trip. Bob Catlow (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cusk. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the season to date. John Mayol (ME - without the Blues Breakers) caught the third largest fish, a 5.5 pound haddock, the largest haddock of the last three trips.

Other Angler Highlights: I am hating to report this but Tim Williams (CT) landed the hard luck award for spending the day in the Hotel Bunny Clark, never wetting a line! That has got to be a first. I might have seen him sick once. But in all the times he has fished with me, all during the six fisherman of the year awards, if he did get sick, he kept right on fishing. In fact, I may have selective memory but I do not remember him ever getting sick. Maybe that's because I put him up so high on a pedestal? A very good man, that Tim Williams. The best.

Thursday, June 9, 2022

Jon Calivas and I (with Nick Wixon as apprentice deck hand) ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was mostly clear, there was zero wind and the visibility over the ocean was, surprisingly, very good.

The ocean's surface was glassy as we left the gate at Perkins Cove behind. The ocean stayed glassy all the way to the fishing grounds. We had a rolling two or more foot gurge that kept the boat rolling all the way out. But we didn't have to go into it to get to our destination. So it was comfortable enough. The sky was mostly clear all the way out. The visibility was excellent. The air temperature topped out at 55F.

On the fishing grounds, we had the two foot roll under a calm surface with no wind to make it any rougher. The sky was sunny making everyone break out the sun glasses. An hour and a half later, the sky was overcast. It must have been after 9:00 AM that the wind started to blow out of the east. With it came the rain. Pouring rain coming down in sheets. Wind speeds came up to twenty knots with higher gusts. Wind driven seas stayed at two to three feet. This seemed calm compared to the wind driving it. But I assumed this was more of a local event. By 1:00 PM, the rain had stopped and the sky was clearing. The wind hauled out of the south and started dropping. On the ride home, we had mostly clear skies, light southerly winds, a rolling swell of three feet and an air temperature of over 60F. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from three boat lengths for ten minutes in fog to fifteen miles in haze. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 56F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 70F (with a low of 54F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 67F (with a low of 55F).

The fishing was good to very good with the weather conditions putting a bit of a damper on it. The catching was excellent. There were a lot of sub-legal fish. Landings were good to very good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. The haddock cull was 60/40 favoring the legal sized fish. This was my first trip seeing so many small haddock. Legal landings also included five pollock, two redfish, thirty-three cusk, fourteen whiting and fifteen mackerel. Released fish included twenty-five cod of 5 pounds or more, twenty-eight small cod, over a hundred small pollock, six dogfish, the short haddock, eleven or so cusk and two porbeagle sharks. We alternated between drifting and anchoring. Bait worked best for the haddock. Jig stick people caught a lot of cod today.

David Paya (VT) should have been high hook. He was high hook with the most legal fish at around noon. That's about when his day fell apart. Sea sickness took over, making him decide to sit out the rest of the day, occasionally hurling over the side. I couldn't tell you who took Dave's place in the high hook department but I know it was someone in the Maine contingent (Rob, Matt or Craig). And, yes, Dave landed the hard luck award t-shirt.

Dave Burton (MA) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12.5 pound cod. This is a tie for the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cod of the season so far. His second largest fish, a 9 pound cod, tied for the third largest fish of the trip. I also weighed a 6.5 pound cod for him. Rob Valentine (ME) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. Matt Gatti (ME) caught a 9 pound cusk that tied with Dave Burton for the third largest fish of the trip. Matt's cusk is the third largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Other Angler Highlights: Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA) lost what I would suspect was a porbeagle shark. It acted like a halibut for the longest time until it got above the thermocline. It broke off before we ever saw the fish. Mark Girard (NH) also broke off a porbeagle. Mark's biggest fish was an 8.5 pound cusk. Craig Rennie (ME) caught the two biggest pollock. They both weighed exactly 7.5 pounds each.

I received several donations today sponsoring my in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to support cancer research through the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those donors and their donations included Mark Girard (NH) for $50.00 (which makes his donation total $200.00 for this year so far!), Dave Burton for a generous $100.00 in memory of his father, Dick Burton, and Bill Donnelly (MA) for $50.00. Thank you all for your kindness, support and generosity. I do so very much appreciate it!

Friday, June 10, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 56F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 52F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west southwest to southwest at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of one to two feet. The air temperature was over 60F for a high. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was sunny and hazy clear all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

The trip today was identical to yesterday's marathon in so many ways. The fishing was not. It was excellent with few dogfish and much better weather. The catching was excellent. Landings were very good overall. Like yesterday, most legal fish landed were haddock. And, again, there were a pile of short haddock released. The haddock cull was a 55/45 split favoring the legal sized fish. Legal landings also included one pollock, ten redfish, eighteen mackerel and eighteen cusk. Released fish included one dogfish, five cod of 5 pounds or more, a handful of short cod, a few small pollock and a couple mackerel They drift fished all day. Bait worked best although everything was tried.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook with the most legal fish today. Rob Smith (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cusk caught by Mike Kruszyna (MA). He also caught a 7 pound cusk, the fourth largest fish of the trip. The third largest fish was a 7.5 pound cod caught by Gerry Garner (MA).

Other Angler Highlights: Rick Gurney (MA) caught the first fish to start off the boat pool, a 6 pound cod. JJT (MA) caught the only legal pollock weighing in at 6 pounds. Tom Tinney (MA) landed the hard luck award t-shirt as he was most affected by the motion of the ocean.

Gloria Gennari (MA) did me a solid today by donating, again (as she does every year), $50.00 toward my fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge for cancer research. Sometimes the donations are of higher value. But she always does seek me out. Thank you, Gloria, for being so thoughtful and helpful. I appreciate your support so very much!

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg (with Nick Wixon as apprentice deck hand) ran the extreme day trip today.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 47F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 51F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the west to southwest at five knots. The ocean was calm. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was a mix of overcast skies and sun. The tide (current) was light. The air temperature hovered above 60F as a high. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

The fishing was excellent, the catching was very good to excellent and landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. This time half of all the haddock caught were sub-legal, the largest percentage this season so far. Legal landings also included thirty-five cusk and twenty-two mackerel. Released fish included five dogfish, one cod of 5 pounds or more, a few small cod, a few sub-legal pollock and a couple mackerel. They drift fished the whole day. Bait worked best.

Adam Croteau (NH) was high hook with the most legal fish. In fact, The Croteau contingent took over the bow and did the best of anyone. The Croteaus have been fishing with me since before I was trying to get Ian Keniston to work for me! Adam didn't get a fish big enough to weigh for the boat pool. He just caught a lot of fish. Casey Smith (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 7 pound cod. The second largest fish and the third largest fish were both caught by Jacob Steward (ME). These fish included a 6 pound wolffish and a 5.5 pound cusk. Jacob also tied for the fourth largest fish with a 5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Tom Johas (ME) caught the first fish to weigh as the boat pool, a 5 pound cusk. Bill Brisebois (ME) caught the largest haddock at 5 pounds. Shane Davis (ME) landed the hard luck award as being the one to soon be married. As you know, man is not whole until he gets married; then he's finished!

Deb & I returned to Ogunquit today at 11:30 AM. We drove to the New Jersey shore on Friday at 3:00 AM to attend the wedding of our daughter's (Halley's) college roommate on Friday night at 5:00 PM. This gave us an opportunity to see our daughter and all her college friends in a venue that I had never been to before. The Jersey shore is quite nice around Point Pleasant, near where we were. Halley is due with her first child in August at some point. And our son, Micah, is due to be married on August 6th. Deb & I are hoping that there are no complications and that Halley can attend the wedding. I would love to have Halley's child born on August 30th, the day in 1973 that I caught ten bluefin tuna in my previous boat, the Mary E. That day was the most special fishing day of my life. If we had boated one more of the three bluefins that I lost that day, it would have been a Perkins Cove record. As it is, I'm tied with two other fishermen who I have always considered as the best in New England.

Sunday, June 12, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was clear with high thin clouds, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The sky was clear all day with the same high thin clouds giving the sky a robin's egg blue color with tufts of white between. By 6:00 PM, we saw darker clouds moving in. Some had light rain showers in them. But they passed through fairly quickly. The lighting was soft all day. The wind remained light from the southwest. The ocean along the shore was calm. The visibility was very good in some haze. The highest air temperature that I saw in Perkins Cove today was 75F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 60F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 48F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots. The ocean surface was smooth over a two to three foot rolling sea swell. The air temperature was in the 60s. The sky was clear with sun. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The tide (current) was light. The surface water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing was very good. They caught a few more dogfish today than they have been catching. That was the limiting factor. The catching was very good to excellent. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was about 50/50, legal fish to sub-legal fish. Legal landings also included five pollock, two cusk, a whiting and forty mackerel. Released fish included a halibut, twenty-five dogfish, nine cod of 5 pounds or more, a few small cod, a few small pollock and a few mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but bait was by far the best for catching haddock.

Tom Zido (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Tom didn't catch anything of notable size. Bill Harding (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 29 pound halibut. It was an inch shy of being legal. So a quick picture was taken, along with the weight, and then it was released back to the ocean alive. The digital image of Bill holding his halibut was taken by Ian Keniston and appears on the left. The second largest fish was a 10 pound cod caught by Zach Grimm (ME) who also caught a 7 pound pollock. The third largest fish was an 8 pound pollock caught by Rich Morrell (ME).

Other Angler Highlights: Max Grimm (ME) caught a 6.5 pound cod. Ciara Sanchez (CA) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled. She came to Ogunquit because she won the trip as a contestant on the game show, The Price is Right. The episode is in on YouTube, so Ian tells me. The show was aired on September 23, 2021. It's not often you have a celebrity aboard the Bunny Clark!

I received two more donations of sponsorship for my cancer fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Bill Harding (ME) donated $30.00 while Bill Kelson (MA), fondly known as Bruce, also gave $30.00. Thank you both so very much for your kindness and support. I really do appreciate the help. But others appreciate it so much more!

Monday, June 13, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, there was a bit of thunder & lightning, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was poor in fog. By 8:00 AM, the roads were nearly dry, the rain having stopped before 7:00 AM. We had very little wind along the shore today. It blew out of the southwest at ten knots close to shore near 6:00 PM but it was only a shore breeze that disappeared two miles out to sea. The sky was mostly cloudy in the morning, sunny from late morning onward. It was humid. There was fog along the shore until almost 10:00 AM, when it disappeared. The highest air temperature that I saw was 75F but it felt warmer at 4:00 PM, when I didn't have access to a thermometer. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 65F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 83F (with a low of 63F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or less. The ocean was calm without swells. The air temperature got up to the higher 60s. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. I'm assuming most of the clouds were in the morning but you do know was assuming does. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged to an eighth of a mile in fog to ten miles in haze. The water temperature reached a high of 60F, the highest surface water temperature we have seen this season by a couple of degrees.

The fishing was good, at best. There were just too many dogfish. The catching was excellent if you included dogfish and excellent if you didn't include dogfish. Landings were good to very good depending on the angler. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. [I do write like a broken record] The haddock cull was 52/48, favoring the legal sized fish. The last few days there have been a lot of small haddock around. Legal landings also included ten pollock, four cusk, six whiting and forty-five mackerel. Released fish included about two hundred dogfish, eight cod of 5 pounds or more, the short haddock, double the small cod, quite a few small pollock and a couple of mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well but bait worked best.

Ian didn't say whom was high hook. But I would guess that it had to be Roger Hopkins (RI). I wasn't there so I definitely do not know. But this is very familiar territory for Roger. Brian Ellis (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 12 pound pollock. The second and third largest fish were both caught by Mark Girard (NH). Those fish included a 10 pound cod and an 8 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Tom Adkins (CT) started off the boat pool with a 7 pound pollock. Dan Dorr (ME) also caught a 7 pound pollock later in the trip. But his claim to fame today was the landing of our second largest whiting at 2.75 pounds. Ruth Lawrence (QC) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick.

Grateful for Tim Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Jon Calivas and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 2:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was clear, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

The wind might have been blowing out of the northwest at ten knots on the ride to the fishing grounds. As we got further offshore we had a chop of about a foot. Even almost on the grounds, the wind was no more than ten knots. We had an easy run out with the wind and seas on our tail. The sky was cloudless, the visibility was excellent and the air temperature had to be close to 60F.

On the grounds, the wind blew up to thirteen knots out of the northwest, maybe. Seas were chops of one to two feet. This wind dropped off near the end of the fishing. We had no wind when we started for home. The high air temperature was above 60F. The tide (current) was fairly strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles.The sky was cloudless all day. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 59F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 82F with a low of 64F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 54F).

The fishing was good at best. There were many short pollock, dogfish, short cod and a tide that was really too strong to anchor with. The catching was excellent. Landings were good for numbers of fish. Most legal fish landed were haddock but not by a long shot and we got nowhere near the bag limit. Legal landings also included forty pollock, thirteen cusk and a halibut. Released fish included over seventy-five dogfish, over a hundred small pollock, thirty cod of 5 pounds or more and quite a few small cod. Normally, I have a better handle on the released fish. Today, not so much. We anchored and drift fished. Anchoring was not very productive today. In fact, it was our slowest marathon of the season for legal fish landed. However, it was the most enjoyable marathon in a long time - for many reasons. All terminal gear worked equally well.

The story of the day was Jake Higgins' halibut, the first one he has ever caught. And when I saw that he had what I suspected was a good halibut, I knew in my heart that he was the right man for the job. I had no doubt that we would see the fish. But I had no idea how big it was either. Of course, I knew it was of legal size. How big? I didn't have a clue. However, I didn't want to lose this fish so I got the harpoon out, told Jon Calivas to get the flying gaff and had two others with the boat gaffs. I don't know how many runs it made to bottom. Nor did I know how many short runs it made. I had plenty of time to rig up the harpoon, get all the lines out of the water and get ready for the fish to reach the surface.

When Jake did bring it to the surface, I decided that I would harpoon it. Instead of throwing the pole as I should have, I punched it and the dart pulled out. The fish screamed back to bottom. And, for a few seconds I thought I had blown it again. All that was needed was for the line to get caught in the throwing line, the harpoon or wrapped in the dart and I would have gone home with my tail between my legs and be thinking about how I screwed it up, thinking about it every day for the next week - like I did when I lost that big halibut for Karl Day earlier this year.

Miraculously, Jake's line didn't get nicked or tangled and he was able to fight the fish back to the boat. This time I threw the harpoon, putting the dart through it's body at the same time that Jon, Gabe Marks (MA), Fred Kunz (NH) and Dan Lee (NH) put the gaff into it. The halibut had no fight left in it when they hauled the fish aboard. We got the tape out and took the caliper fork length of the fish and came up with 60" making the "over the round" length about 62" or a fish estimated at 115 pounds. In fact, it weighed 116.5 pounds, the third largest halibut that has ever been landed by the Bunny Clark. Jake put on a hell of a show, certainly the professional show of a seasoned angler. I was so glad to have him aboard and to watch him catch that fish.

I took a picture of Jake trying to hold up the big halibut showing the underside of the fish. This digital image appears on the lower left in this entry.

The whole idea of the trip today was to go to some place where we had a good chance of catching a halibut. To me, the bottom didn't look like active halibut bottom when we started to fish there. What do I know? So I got away from the traditional bottom where I had caught many before and decided to drift off the edge instead. Whether that was the key or it was just shit luck, we hooked up.

I couldn't tell you who was high hook. There were no real standouts. Jake won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, the 116.5 pound halibut, a Maine state trophy fish by 66.5 pounds. He really didn't catch any other fish of note. Fred Kunz won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 20 pound pollock. This is the largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Fred caught this fish as part of a double that also included a pollock that weighed 8.5 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's largest double of the fishing season to date. I took a picture of Fred holding his big pollock, this digital image appears on the upper left. He also caught a 9.25 pound cusk, the Bunny Clark's third largest cusk of the fishing season so far. Ryan Tully (NH) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 15.5 pound pollock. I weighed another pollock of Ryan's that was 10 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Merv Miller (OH) caught the first fish that I could weigh for the boat pool, a 9 pound cod. His best haddock weighed, 5.5 pounds, the third largest haddock of the trip. The second largest haddock was caught by Mark Pray (MA). It weighed 6 pounds. Mark also caught two cod of 9 pounds each and another cod that weighed 10.5 pounds. Dave Struzik (VT) caught the largest haddock of the Bunny Clark season today with an 8 pounder, a Maine state trophy by a pound. I took a picture of Dave with my iPhone. This digital image appears on the right.

Bill Devon (VT) is the man I turn to in the winter to find the grammatical errors I made in the Guestletter. He has to read the Guestletter first before I put it up permanently. He was fishing on the boat with me today. Bill caught the largest cod of the day at 12 pounds. He caught the fourth largest fish, a 14 pound pollock. He also caught a 10 pound pollock that I weighed. I weighed two fish for Gabe Marks. They included a 9.25 pound cod and an 11.5 pound pollock. Paul Blaine (NY) caught a double that included a 12 pound pollock and a 9 pound pollock. He also caught an 11.5 pound pollock. Jay Parent (NH) landed a 12.25 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Dan Lee caught a 4.75 pound haddock, one of his fish of note. Peggy Laramie (NH) landed the hard luck award t-shirt for being the only person to get sea sick. Too bad because she was doing very well catching fish in the beginning. Her condition took the starch out of her in the end, keeping her out of the fishing for the rest of the day.

I received three donations from anglers who attended today's marathon trip sponsoring my cancer project with the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Those anglers and their donations included Merv Miller for $20.00, Mark Pray for $15.00 and Ryan Tully for $15.00. Thank you all so very much for your support and thoughtfulness. The help means a lot to me but more to those who are suffering and to the researchers who need the funding to continue their good work!

Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg hosted the Tom Bruyere (all New York) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear, the wind was out of the north at ten knots or less and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. We had no wind along the shore today. The ocean was calm. The sky was cloudless in the morning. But, after noon, the clouds started creeping in. By 4:00 PM, the sky was overcast, a thinner than normal overcast that carried on into the night. The air temperature never really got that high. I had a reading of 71F, a perfect temperature. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 61F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 77F - no f-ing way - (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northeast at ten to five knots, diminishing as the day progressed. It was warm in the morning but hot in the afternoon, 70F in the shade but much warmer in the sun. And it was sunny and clear while they were fishing. The tide (current) was light to moderate. Seas started out as chops of one to two feet but diminished to calm. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

The fishing was very good today. The weather was nearly perfect and there were few dogfish. Again, most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was 50/50 legal to sub-legal, which was much better. Legal landings also included twenty-one cusk, one pollock, sixty-two whiting (the most whiting that has ever been landed on the Bunny Clark during a trip) and five mackerel. Released fish included thirty-nine dogfish, two wolffish, three cod of 5 pounds or more, a few small cod, a few small pollock and a couple of mackerel. Drifting was the method. Bait worked best, by far.

Bob Mathews (FL) was high hook with, far and away, the most legal fish. Shawn Hubbard won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound wolffish. This is the second largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. The second largest fish was a 12 pound cod caught by Bob Williams. Anthony Hubbard caught the third largest fish, a 6 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Rich Mattott landed the hard luck award for losing a jig. There were no hard luck cases, really, today.

I received two donations today supporting my cancer research fund raising drive with the Pan-Mass Challenge. One was a $30.00 cash donation from Pete Backus (NY). The other was a very generous $500.00 donation from Betsy McLaughlin (NY) who has sponsoring my rides very generously for years. Thank you both so very much your kindness, thoughtfulness and generosity. It means so much to so many!

Thursday, June 16, 2022

Jon Calivas and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was very good at least.

After we left the gate, we had no wind for the first five or six miles. The ocean was calm. We had southwest wind of five to ten knots for the rest of the ride out. Seas were chops of about a foot. The visibility was very good, the air temperature was mild and the sky was cloudless.

On the grounds, the wind increased from the southwest to ten and fifteen knots and then backed out of the south southwest and increased some more. By the time we left grounds, the velocity was twenty knots with higher gusts with four to six foot seas, mostly created by an opposing tide. The high air temperature was mild all day; t-shirt weather.. The tide (current) was fairly strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles.The sky was cloudless for most of the morning and overcast after noon. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 60.8F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 74F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 75F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 69F (with a low of 51F).

Ny Nhath (VT) and Bryan Martins (MA) tied for high hook. There were some anglers who were close but they were not close enough. Ny won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 18.5 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's second largest pollock of the fishing season so far. I took a picture of Ny holding his big pollock shortly after boating it. This digital image appears on the left. He caught many others over 10 pounds including an 11 pounder that I weighed. But I ended up not weighing many more pollock on the boat unless they looked big. Ny could have won the boat pool with a much bigger fish, a halibut. And looking at the sounding machine, it was a big one. How big? It's hard to say because the fish wasn't under the transducer long enough to tell. But from what I saw I would guarantee that it weighed over 100 pounds. But, as is so often the case, Ny's drag was too tight and he broke the fish off early in the fight. At least "I" didn't lose it for him! This time!

Bryan won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 17 pound pollock. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest pollock of the season so far. He caught the pollock as part of a double with another pollock of 5 pounds, both fish caught on the same line at the same time. I also took a picture of Bryan holding his pollock on the bow, where he caught it. This digital image appears on the right. Some of his other fish that I weighed included a 10.5 pound pollock, a 15 pound pollock, a 13 pound pollock and two pollock of 12.5 pounds each.

Tony Scieszka (TX) caught the third largest fish, a 16 pound pollock. This ties our fifth largest pollock of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. He also caught a double that included a 13 pound pollock and a 10 pound pollock. This too is a tie for the fifth largest double of the season to date.

Other Angler Highlights: Barry Adams (ME) caught a 14 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Rick Turner (NY) landed a 12 pound pollock. Rick also caught a pile of dogfish. Tom Murphy (VT) caught a double that included a 7 pound pollock and an 11 pound pollock. His biggest fish was a 14 pound pollock. And he caught an 11 pound cod. Dave Struzik (VT) caught the biggest double of the day and, so far, the second largest double of the Bunny Clark fishing season. His catch included a 13.5 pound pollock and a 12.5 pound pollock. Raymond Charles (ME) caught the two biggest cod of the day. One weighed 13.5 pounds and the other weighed 12 pounds. I weighed an 11 pound pollock for him early in the trip but I'm sure he caught another that was bigger. the 13.5 pound cod is the Bunny Clark's third largest cod of the season on this day. Jim Jarvis, Sr. (MA) caught a 12 pound pollock and a 13 pound pollock. He may have caught a bigger one but nothing near 16 pounds. Al Doyle (MA) caught a 14.5 pound pollock, his best fish. Jimmy Jarvis, Jr. (MA) landed the hard luck award for being the highest of two hurlers! Jimmy actually caught quite a few fish.

I received two more donations sponsoring my ride in the Pan-Mass Challenge after I arrived back to the town float today. These were both from two of my favorite regulars anglers who were on the boat today. One was a $40.00 donation from Raymond Charles. The other was also a $40.00 donation from one of my favorite haddock killers, Tom Murphy. Thank you both so very much for your support on this cancer project of mine. It's very much appreciated!

Friday, June 17, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was out of the south southwest at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. By mid morning, ashore, the wind had hauled out of the west southwest. At times, the wind was more northwest. After noon, we had thick black clouds move in with rain. Ogunquit got just a few spits of rain. But the towns north and south of us got thunder and lightning, gusty winds and rain. We never got much of a change of wind speed. The wind blew about ten or fifteen knots all day. Once the storms passed through during the late afternoon, the sky cleared and became sunny. The visibility was very good. The highest air temperature that I saw was 86F. But it wasn't as humid as it could have been so it was comfortable. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 86F (with a low of 62F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 84F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to fifteen knots. Seas were two to four feet in chops. The air temperature stayed in the high 60s. The tide (current) was moderate. The visibility ranged from ten to fifteen miles in haze. The sky was overcast for the fishing. Ian didn't talk about any rain so I'm assuming that they didn't have any. The surface water temperature reached a high of 58F.

The fishing, again, was good overall. There were too many dogfish, cod, small pollock and mackerel to make it any better. These are all fish you catch when you should be catching fish that you can put in the boat. Plus, the weather wasn't the greatest. The catching, of course, was excellent. You couldn't get to bottom without catching some fish right off the bat. Landings were good, as might be assumed. Most legal fish landed were haddock. The haddock cull was very good with less than twenty percent being too small to keep. Legal landings also included four pollock, five cusk, two whiting and nearly a hundred mackerel. Released fish included over a hundred dogfish, the sub-legal haddock, seven cod of 5 pounds or more, quite a few small cod, a few mackerel and a load of small pollock. All the fishing was completed by drifting. All terminal gear worked well.

Captain Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Marty Buskey (NY) couldn't get to bottom through the mackerel and he said that he caught a ton of fish, mostly unwanted. Marty always enjoys himself out fishing. But, being a seasoned veteran, he likes the bigger fish and haddock. Gary Hammond, Jr. (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound cod. I believe that he also caught the largest pollock at 6.5 pounds. There was a tie for the second largest fish, both weighing in at 7.5 pounds. Both fish were cod. Keith Marinoff (NH) caught one while Jeff Corey (MA) caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Steven Balevre (NH) caught a 7 pound cod, one of the biggest fish of the trip. Brian Tufts (FL) landed the hard luck award for three reasons. One, he lost a jig. Two, he got sea sick for the first time on the Bunny Clark or any boat! I'm not going to go into the third reason. Suffice it to say, it was not Brian's day.

People were very generous today sponsoring me in cancer fund raising cycling event with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Marty & Elise Buskey (NY) donated $50.00 to the cause. Like last year, they have been very generous with a number of $50.00 donations this year already. Steve LaPlante (CT) donated a generous $100.00 as he does every year. And Wayne & Jackie Griffin (MA) donated a very very generous $2,000.00 toward the my cancer research program. They donated a like amount last year as well. Thank you all so very much for your generosity and thoughtfulness. This is very much appreciated by all!

Saturday, June 18, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was mostly cloudy, the wind was light out of the southwest and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. The visibility stayed excellent all day. But the wind changed. At 7:00 AM, the wind started to blow from the northwest at twenty knots, more or less. This kept up all morning until around noon, when the wind backed to the west northwest with a gust over forty knots at first and then settled in at twenty-five knots with some higher gusts. That first initial blast knocked a tree down across the road at Perkins Parking Lot just up the street stopped vehicles from passing. The wind blew like this until before sunset when it stayed right around twenty knots. The sky was clear with some clouds all day. The air temperature in Perkins Cove reached a high of 65F that I could see. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 73F with a low of 55F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 67F (with a low of 51F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 55F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five to ten knots all morning. Ian was thrilled that the wind wasn't going to blow very hard this day. His hopes were dashed when, at about noon, he got the same wind we did. I came on as a blast and then settled in at around twenty-five knots. It was a choppy ride home with cruising speed held at about nine knots. They were drifting all morning but had to anchor when the wind changed. The visibility was over twenty miles. The air temperature stayed in the 60s. The tide (current) was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds/overcast. Seas went from one to two feet to three and four feet in chops. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was good to fair, with the weather shift. It was also no better than good because of the number of dogfish caught. The catching was very good if you didn't include the dogfish, excellent if you did. Landings were good, turning to fair as the hurling count went up and some anglers stopped fishing. Again, most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. A third of the haddock caught today were sub-legal. Legal landings also included a few pollock (yea!), a cusk and a whiting. Released fish included over a hundred dogfish, three cod of 5 pounds or more, the short haddock and a few small cod and pollock. As I mentioned, they anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Tony Lamoureux (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 10 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 9 pound pollock caught by Dee Lamoureux (VT). Leo Lamoureux (VT) caught the third largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock. It was a family thing!

Other Angler Highlights: Don Bilodeau (NH) caught the fourth largest fish, an 8 pound pollock. Derek Halley (NH) landed the hard luck for attaining high hurler status. He was very vocal about it!

Sunday, June 19, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and I (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) hosted the Matt Jones (all Maine) extreme day trip charter today. We didn't have a deck hand today so Ian lent his skills so that Danny could start to learn the system and get the best instruction on filleting. I became the captain but turned into the deck hand when we returned back to Perkins Cove. I wanted to give the Bunny Clark a thorough cleaning and, at the same time, show Danny how the boat was finished before leaving to go home.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 55F, the sky was overcast, it was raining lightly, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good in precipitation.

It was an easy ride to the fishing grounds as we traveled to leeward the whole way there. Winds were out of the north at fifteen to twenty knots with higher gusts. We had little rain actually on top of us on the ride out but you could see rain showers around us. The air temperature was cool and remained in the mid 50s.

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the north all day. Wind speeds were twenty to twenty-five knots with a few higher gusts for about an hour. Seas ranged from three to four feet to four and five feet and then back to about four feet, more or less. It was choppy but certainly not horrible. The sky was mostly overcast with some peeks at the sun during the morning to fully overcast after noon with periodic light rain showers. We stayed mostly in the dry today. The air temperature never got out of the lower 50s. The visibility ranged to thirty miles without the rain to fifteen with the light showers. The tide (current) was into the wind which made the seas sharper. Because of this, we could have easily drift fished. But it would have been a hell of a lot less comfortable and it didn't suit my plans for today. The surface water temperature reached a high of 57F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 63F with a low of 51F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 62F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 56F (with a low of 50F).

The fishing was very good, less so for those who were a bit sea sick. We never did have anyone incapacitated with this condition; everyone fished all day. The dogfish weren't that bad. And we had one spot where we never saw a dogfish at all. The catching was good to very good. Landings were good but were very good or excellent if you considered the quality of the fish landed. We boated thirteen Maine state trophy fish today and landed the top five cusk, the top five redfish and two of the three biggest whiting of the year today. Most legal fish landed were haddock. There were very few sub-legal haddock. We had three hours where we never saw a sub-legal haddock. Legal landings also included a few pollock, thirty-eight redfish, twenty-one cusk, two whiting, a redfish and two mackerel. Released fish included forty-eight dogfish, only two cod (both over 5 pounds), eight sub-legal haddock, six or eight small pollock and a mackerel. We spent the day anchoring from spot to spot. Bait was best. It had to be; no one used a jig. And only four cod flies were used.

What struck me today, again, was the number of cod caught or should I say the number of cod that weren't caught. I don't care what anyone says, the cod population is way down. Too far down. To see only two cod yesterday in places that were always loaded with cod in the years before was nearly heart rending. But I digress.....

We ran three pools today. A pool for the first fish, a pool for the largest fish and a pool for the smallest fish by length. Those were the instructions that I was given for the day. Matt Jones was high hook with the most legal fish. He was on fire from the moment we started fishing until the last fish - which he caught. He won the charter pool for the first fish, a small pollock, and he also won the charter pool for the smallest fish, a 7.75 inch redfish, the only sub-legal redfish of the trip. Matt caught the only two cod of the day. His largest weighed 12 pounds. And he caught another that was probably 7 pounds. It was the last fish caught today. His largest fish was a 13.25 pound Maine state trophy cusk which was the largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season when he caught it. Unfortunately for Matt, this was soon eclipsed by five others. He also caught a 3 pound Maine state trophy whiting, the third largest whiting of the Bunny Clark fishing season to date. It was a good day to be Matt Jones!

Kris Hiltz won the charter pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 21 pound Maine state trophy cusk. This is the largest cusk of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Larry Merlino caught the second largest fish, a 20.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk, the Bunny Clark's second largest cusk of the season so far. I took a picture of both Larry and Kris holding both their trophy cusk standing side by side. Larry is the angler on the left with the good smile. This digital image appears on the left. The third largest fish was an 18.5 pound Maine state trophy cusk caught by Randy Jones. This cusk is our third largest cusk of the fishing season to date. Randy may have been second hook but I'm not as sure of this as I was of Matt being high hook. Randy also caught a 16 pound Maine state trophy cusk, which is our fifth largest cusk of the Bunny Clark season to date. He also caught the largest redfish that I took a picture of at 2.5 pounds, a Maine state trophy and a tie for the largest redfish of the season so far. This digital image appears on the right. He also landed the largest pollock at 10 pounds. Walt Inman tied with Randy for the largest redfish, a Maine state trophy (of course) at 2.5 pounds. Walt also caught a 2 pound Maine state trophy redfish and a 1.75 pound redfish, our fourth and fifth largest redfish of the 2022 Bunny Clark fishing season so far.

Other Angler Highlights: Gary Beaudet caught the Bunny Clark's fourth largest cusk of the season so far, a 17 pound Maine state trophy. Jeremy Wilcox landed a 2.25 pound redfish, the Bunny Clark's third largest redfish of the season so far. Thirteen year old Carter Inman boated the Bunny Clark's largest whiting of the season at 3.5 pounds, a Maine state trophy. Phil Henry landed the hard luck award for being the first and the most sea sick. He still fished the whole day non-stop.

I was very pleased with the way Danny handled himself on the boat today. He has never done this before, although he has been a fisherman all his life and has spent many hours lobstering as a deck hand. I am looking forward to his continued improvement and success.

Monday, June 20, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the Scott Thrasher (all Maine Woods heroes) extreme day trip charter today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the northwest at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. Ashore, the visibility remained excellent for the morning and dropped to very good with a bit of haze. The wind was light out of the northwest in the morning, calm and then light out of the southwest. The ocean along the shore remained calm all day. I never did look at the air temperature. It was t-shirt weather in the morning and cooler in the afternoon. The sky was clear all day with some clouds. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 79F with a low of 52F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 77F (with a low of 41F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 45F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the northwest at five knots or less and died out to nothing. It was calm all day. The air temperature was over 70F with the calm weather and sunshine. And it was sunny all day. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in some haze. The tide (current) was moderate. The water temperature reached a high of 59F.

The fishing would have been excellent. But..... There were many dogfish. Too many. Ian told me that on one stop, all they caught were dogfish. So the fishing was good, maybe. The catching was excellent if you included them, very good if you didn't. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Eleven percent of all the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included four pollock, one redfish, twenty cusk, two whiting and eight mackerel. Released fish included over two hundred dogfish, twelve cod of 5 pounds or more, forty small cod, about seventy-five short pollock and a couple of mackerel. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked equally well.

Ian couldn't tell me who was high hook. Kyle Murphy won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 11 pound cod. Mike Coulombe caught the second largest fish, a 9 pound cod. There was a tie for third place at 8 pounds, both cod. Connor Whelan caught one and Scott Davis caught the other.

Other Angler Highlights: Scott Thrasher caught a 7 pound cod to start the boat pool off. Troy Spinney caught a 7.5 pound cod. Julia Horst landed the hard luck award for getting into the worst tangle of the day.

When I got home after the fishing trip was over I found a check on my desk from the money box this morning for $50.00. It was a donation from Mike Coulombe sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to raise money for cancer research. Thank you, Mike. I never got a chance to thank you personally as I didn't know until you had left. I do so appreciate the support and your thoughtfulness. All the best to you. And thanks for being there today!

Tim Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Jon Calivas and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 50F, the sky was clear, a half moon (adjacent with Venus) was hanging high over the eastern horizon, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent.

It was 49F when we left the goal posts of Perkins Cove behind us headed out to the fishing grounds, a cooler morning than most. But it was "flat ass calm", as my father would have said. With clear skies and excellent visibility, it was a treat to ride to the grounds.

On the grounds, the ocean was still flat calm. And it stayed flat calm until an easterly wind showed up. When the wind first landed it was about ten knots but it dropped out after that, leaving us with five knots of east and then east southeast wind. Seas were a foot in chops. The air temperature got up into the 60s before the wind but it remained t-shirt weather for the day. The sky was cloudless all day. The tide (current) was very strong, as strong as I have ever seen it. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles in some haze. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 55.8F, very cold for this time of year.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 53F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 78F (with a low of 43F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 66F (with a low of 46F).

The fishing was fair, at best. The tide was so strong that, after the first drift, you couldn't drift anymore. At anchor, the lines streamed aft so far that, even if the dogfish weren't there, you would have seen tangles all day. As it was, the dogfish were horrendous. Only the anglers in the bow were somewhat successful with the tangles, mostly because they were casting up along the anchor line. The catching and landings were good to very good despite the conditions. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, the most legal haddock I have seen in three weeks. And the size was perfect with three trophy haddock besides. Many anglers got the bag limit of haddock but the boat's total was not attained. I'm not sure we could have with the number of dogfish that were caught. Legal landings also included forty-eight pollock, one redfish, fifteen cusk and two mackerel. Released fish included thirty-two sub-legal haddock, nine cod from 7 to 20.5 pounds, no small cod at all, twenty-two sub-legal pollock, a mackerel and over one hundred and fifty dogfish. We were only able to make one successful drift. After that, every time we tried to drift, you couldn't hold bottom. Anchoring was the only method for the day and probably the reason we ended up with more haddock than pollock. All terminal gear worked well.

It would have been tough to discern whom was high hook. There was so much action all day that I couldn't pick a stand out. Only Fred Kunz (NH) counted his fish. He had over thirty legal, fifteen of those being haddock. Steve Selmer (NH) should have won the boat pool with the largest fish. Of course, it was a halibut. And, of course, we lost it before we had a chance to see it. Steve had it on for about five minutes, maybe more. It was a massive fish. I have never seen such a signature on the sounding machine before. It was unmistakable. The head shakes on the rod would move the rod two feet. And they were powerful head shakes. It almost seemed to me that he had the fish foul hooked in the head. On the machine, it looked like it was rubbing in the bottom as clouds of bottom material (rocks, maybe?) were being thrown up. It emerged a couple of times as a lone signature. And then it was gone! Just like that. I looked up at Steve through the window (who was in the bow) and saw that he was reeling up fast in hopes that it was swimming to the boat. But no such luck. The fish was gone. The first thought in my mind was; "At least I wasn't the reason that he lost it." It just wasn't meant to be. And, really, the weather has sucked (when I have had the boat) for catching halibut. The strangest thing was that, after the loss, we couldn't catch another fish on that spot, even a dogfish! And we never got another chance at a halibut, that I am aware of, all day.

Ken Johnson (VT) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 20.5 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's largest cod of the season to date and our first steaker of the season. I took a picture of Ken with his cod just before he released it back to the ocean alive. This digital image appears on the left. Ken's second largest fish was a 15 pound cod, a tie for the Bunny Clark's third largest cod so far this year and the third largest fish of the trip. His largest haddock was a 7.5 pound Maine state trophy. This is a tie for our third largest haddock of the Bunny Clark season to date. Ken did very well on numbers of legal fish as well.

Steve Selmer never did redeem himself today but he did win the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 17 pound cod, the second largest cod of our season so far. His largest haddock was a 9 pound Maine state trophy, the Bunny Clark's largest haddock of the season so far. I took a picture of Steve holding his haddock on the bow shortly after boating it. This digital image appears here on the right.

Other Angler Highlights: Just about the first fish in the boat was a 5.25 pound haddock, caught by Bob Mayer (ME). That was bigger than any haddock we have seen all week. Not only that, it had the frame of a much bigger fish. That was pretty exciting. Actually, everyone caught haddock of 4 pounds or more today. John Tanguay (ME) caught our largest pollock of the trip at 14.5 pounds. Tim Clark caught our fourth largest cod at 12 pounds. Chris Johnson (VT) caught the only redfish of the trip, a Maine state trophy of just over 2 pounds. This is the Bunny Clark's fourth largest redfish of the season to date. Barry Ano (NY) caught a 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock, his best haddock of the trip and the Bunny Clark's fifth largest haddock of the season so far. Nick Johnson (VT) caught an 11.5 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Rocco Ventura, III (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the most tangled. He really wasn't the most tangled but I did abuse him about it the most!

I received several donations today sponsoring me in my cancer research project with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. Those donors and their donations included Barry Ano for a generous $100.00, Randy Sheltra (VT) for $30.00, Nick Johnson for $30.00, Bob Mayer (ME) for $50.00 and Steve Clark for a very generous $300.00! Thank you all so very much for the support you have given me today and your thoughtfulness and generosity. I am always amazed with the help I get from so many. Thanks again!

Wednesday, June 22, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Micah Tower (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) ran the extreme day trip today. At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 58F, the sky was overcast, the wind was blowing out of the southeast at ten knots and the visibility over the ocean was excellent. As the day progressed the wind picked up offshore but not along the shore. The wind remained out of the south or southeast at ten knots or maybe a little more. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. No rain fell today. With the wind off the cooler ocean water, the air temperature was kept down to reasonable levels. I saw 65F as a high for the day. The visibility was very good in some haze. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 67F with a low of 57F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 71F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 64F (with a low of 53F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southeast at ten to fifteen knots with higher gusts. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The air temperature was mild, too cool for a t-shirt. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was strong like it was on yesterday's trip. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature reached a high of 56F.

The fishing was fair, as it was yesterday. There were a ton of dogfish and the current was untenable on the drift, and barely tenable while anchored. The catching was excellent if you included dogfish, very good if you dislike the dogfish, as I do. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Twenty-five percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included fourteen pollock, nine cusk, a whiting and ten mackerel. Released fish included twelve cod of 5 pounds or more, forty-four small cod, a few small pollock, over two hundred dogfish, the short haddock and a couple mackerel. They tried drifting a couple times with zero success. So anchoring was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian was unsure whom was the high hook for the most legal fish today. Chris Cote (ME) should have won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a cod that looked to be about 16 pounds (more or less) and would have been our third largest cod of the Bunny Clark season. However, since you can't keep cod, Ian didn't want to kill the fish by gaffing it. In the process of trying to get a hand under the gill plate, the cod came off the jig and scooted to bottom. Chris' largest fish was an 11 pound cod, the second largest fish of the trip. Matt Luce (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13.5 pound cod. The third largest fish was shared among three anglers at 9 pounds each. Matt Berthiaume (ME) landed a 9 pound pollock. Wyatt Senedal (ME) caught a 9 pound cod. Rich Antanavich (ME) also caught a 9 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Devon Pollard (ME) attained high hurler status and won the Bunny Clark's hardest luck of the trip award!

Chris Cote did me a solid by donating $30.00 to my cancer research fund raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. He did this when I saw him after the trip while on the float. Chris usually fishes with his brother. But his brother was in Florida. Thanks, Chris, for your thoughtfulness. I do very much appreciate this!

Thursday, June 23, 2022

We never did get enough anglers to allow the Bunny Clark, and I, as captain, the privilege to challenge the high seas in the quest for amazing fish. As a result, the Bunny Clark lies sulking at the Barnacle Billy's dock with the wooden anchors out.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was overcast, it was misting, the road was damp, the wind was blowing out of the south at five knots and the visibility over the ocean was fair to good in fog. The misting stopped around 7:00 AM, leaving us with overcast skies, mild temperatures and light southeast winds. By noon, the sun was out and the day seemed like it had been perfect from the onset. We even had fog at mid morning. That was all gone by noon. The rest of the day saw east southeast wind to ten knots, sunny skies with clouds, a very good visibility and a high temperature in Perkins Cove of 70F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 71F with a low of 58F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 76F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 71F (with a low of 56F).

I spent the day at the restaurant.

Part of my day was calling anglers for our two big invitational offshore trips, the SOFT and the Ultra Marathon. Many of the anglers on the SOFT will be different. One, who was supposed to be going, had a heart attack just the other day, some have other obligations. Also, this is a bit late in the year (by two weeks) for calling as I have had other challenges (including captaining the Bunny Clark on days where I couldn't find a deck hand).

Friday, June 24, 2022

We have had one angler on the books for today's trip for over a week; Joe Weaver (NY). Joe has tried for four years to sail with us on the Bunny Clark. All four times the trip has been canceled for one reason or another. I was lucky enough to see Joe at Barnacle Billy's the other day. He and his wife came to visit/abuse me. I do appreciate the abuse. We had a good laugh besides. Joe has caught some amazing fish with me including huge cod and huge cusk. Alas, with only one angler, in this day and age, taking him would have set me behind for over a week while also trying to get our head above water after last year's engine problems. The wooden anchors remain!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 59F, the sky was overcast, the road was dry, the wind was very light out of the east, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good, at least. We didn't have much wind today at all. The ocean along the shore remained calm. We might have seen some southerly wind but it never blew up to ten knots. We might have seen six or eight knots, maybe. The sky was mostly sunny all day. The visibility was very good in haze. The highest air temperature that I saw as 76F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 78F with a low of 59F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 57F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 75F (with a low of 56F).

I worked in the restaurants all day after an eye exam in the morning.

But I was also down on the boat today trying to help Cody from Power Products. We had had an annoying oil leak that had become more prominent in the last two weeks. It finally got bad enough that I decided to call Power Products. I could, finally, tell that the oil seemed to be coming from the turbo that was replaced new last year. Sure enough, when the covers and insulation were taken off it, the banjo fitting from the oil feed line to the turbo was loose enough that it could be taken out with a couple fingers. It looked like the compression washers were hardly used. This was tightened down so, at some future date, the washers will be replaced with new just to insure that there is no leak there in the future. For now, these used washers will stand - there was no leaking after Cody was finished.

Saturday, June 25, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) ran the full day trip today. At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 63F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good in some haze. We really had no wind all day. The wind was light from the northwest at sunrise. But it was so light as to not have any direction. What little northwest wind that we did have died out in the later morning leaving the ocean glassy calm. The afternoon saw light southerly wind that hauled more to the west all day, finally becoming west at sunset. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. The sky, cloudless in the morning, stayed nearly so all day. We did see some clouds in the afternoon but there were not many and certainly no threat of a thunder shower. The visibility was hazy all day with no hint of fog. The air temperature rose to the point of being uncomfortable. Just when it seemed that it was going to be too warm, the light southwest wind along the shore seemed to quell the worst of it. The highest air temperature that I saw was 85F. But I would not have been surprised if it was higher than that. And it well could have been further inland. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 84F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 53F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 59F).

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind. The ocean was calm all day, glassy for almost all of it. There was no discernable swell either. This was strange because there was plenty of surf on the beach today. The air temperature went from warm to hot. But with no wind, sitting on a mirror, you would expect that. The air temperature reached 80F in the shade. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles in haze. The tide (current) was light to moderate. The sky was clear and sunny all day. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F. This is very late in the season for the surface water to be so cold.

The fishing could have been excellent. The weather was perfect (albeit, a bit too warm), the drift was perfect and we had some excellent anglers aboard. But there were dogfish, many dogfish. And it was perfect weather for dogfish. It wasn't until the last stop where Captain Ian found a spot where the dogs weren't so savage and they could catch the targeted species. Until that time, the fishing was poor. This made the catching fair and landings were fair to poor. Legal landings included twenty-seven haddock, twenty-two cusk and four whiting. Released fish included a couple small pollock, five cod of 5 pounds or more, fourteen small cod, five sub-legal haddock and well over two hundred dogfish. Drifting was the only method available to them today as it was so calm. All terminal gear worked equally well.

The landings were very good for one angler, however. Amy Fino (MA) managed to find good fish through the dogfish on every stop. She was by far the high hook with the most legal fish and she won the boat pool for the largest with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was an 8 pound cod caught by Jack Decormier (NH). It's funny how Jack seems to out-fish his father, Dana, on every trip lately. Brian Miller (PA) caught the third largest fish, a 6.5 pound cusk.

Other Angler Highlights: Austin Bohn (PA) landed the hardest luck of the trip award by being most affected by the motion of the ocean. There were a couple anglers who were sea sick, believe it or not. Maybe they were just sick of the dogfish!

Sunday, June 26, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) ran the extreme day trip today. At 4:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was cloudless, there was no wind to write about and the visibility over the ocean was very good in some haze. Ashore, the sky was cloudless in the morning, less so in the afternoon. The wind, again, was light most of the day. By evening, a southerly wind cropped up and blew up to fifteen knots. The visibility remained good to very good in some haze. The air temperature reached a high of 84F, that I saw. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 90F with a low of 68F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 91F (with a low of 60F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 86F (with a low of 64F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots. Seas were light chops over a rolling sea swell of two to three feet. The air temperature got into the 70s. The visibility ranged from fifteen to twenty miles. The tide (current) was light. The sky was sunny and clear all day. The surface water reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was made poor by the shear volume of dogfish always present wherever they went. Today they could not get away from them. The weather would have been perfect for a good day of fishing without them. The catching was good. Landings were fair. Most legal fish landed were haddock by far, many more than yesterday mostly because of the longer fishing time on an extreme day trip. Twenty percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included one pollock, seven redfish, four cusk and seven whiting. Released fish included two hundred or more dogfish, eighteen small cod, four cod of 5 pounds or more, the short haddock, a few small pollock and a wolffish. Drifting was the method, the drift was too slow to anchor. All terminal gear worked well.

Ian couldn't tell me whom was high hook. Aaron Baker (NY) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 9.5 pound pollock. Aaron also caught the third largest fish, a 6.5 pound wolffish. Joey Marks (VT) caught the second largest fish, an 8 pound cod.

Other Angler Highlights: Andrew Marks (VT) caught a 6 pound cod, the fourth largest fish caught today. Joey Marks was the most tangled angler of the trip. For this he was presented with the hard luck award t-shirt.

Monday, June 27, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 66F, the sky was mostly cloudy (almost like a mackerel sky with it's symmetrical pattern), the wind was blowing out of the south at fifteen knots and the visibility over the ocean was good to very good in haze. The visibility dropped a skosch as day began. Rain showers in the distance took away some of distance and the humidity took some as well. The air temperature never got up above 75F, that I saw. The wind blew out of the south for most of the day. After noon, it was more southwest. The velocity was fifteen to twenty knots. After noon, the wind increased with gusts over twenty-five knots. This lasted an hour or so. By mid afternoon, I noticed that the wind had hauled more southwest. Wind speeds dropped to about ten to fifteen knots by 5:00 PM. At that time the wind was out of the south. The sky was overcast all day after the 5:00 AM viewing. It rained all around Ogunquit in York and surrounding towns. It started to rain in Ogunquit at 4:00 PM. It rained for fifteen minutes and stopped. It never rained again. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 77F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 80F (with a low of 61F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 74F (with a low of 63F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the south at ten to twenty knots. Seas at that time were three to five feet in chops. After noon, the wind hauled out of the southwest at blew at fifteen to ten knots. Seas dropped to two and four feet in chops. The air temperature got up into the middle 60s. The sky was overcast for the day. The visibility ranged from a quarter of a mile to ten miles in rain and haze. It rained for an hour at one point. But, mostly, it would rain for a couple of minutes and stop, starting again a few minutes later. For most of the day you didn't need an oil top. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 60F.

The fishing was good, the catching was very good and landings were good. There were many dogfish again but they weren't as bad as they were yesterday. There were also more fish to catch in general. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far, a much better landings day than yesterday. Probably ten percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal. So, many more larger haddock were caught today. Legal landings also included five pollock, two redfish, one cusk and three white hake. Released fish included about a hundred dogfish, one cod over 5 pounds, twelve short cod and a small pollock. They anchored and drift fished. All terminal gear worked equally well.

There were a lot of fish caught today. Ian could not keep track of who caught the most legal fish. Kari Sawyer (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 13 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 6 pound pollock caught by Andy Hamilton (ME). There was a cod that was caught that was over 5 pounds but it was tossed back. So, officially, the third largest fish was a 4.75 pound haddock caught by Ray Godbout (NH).

Other Angler Highlights: Had all the anglers been fishing, it still would have been a good day for landings. But only half were bending rods over the rail. The angler who was most under the weather was Bill Judge (NH). He landed the hard luck award today.

If you consider that only half of the anglers were fishing, it was actually a very good day for landings.

Tim Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Jon Calivas and I ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was clear, the wind was light out of the west and the visibility over the ocean was very good or seemed that way.

It was a nice mild ride to the fishing grounds with northwest winds of about ten knots, a following chop of a foot or two, a short swell from the south of three feet on average, a cloudless sky and excellent visibility.

On the grounds, The wind started out of the northwest at about ten knots with a chop that was a foot or more. We also had a short swell that ranged from three to six feet to about two feet or so when it was time to leave to go home. The wind died for just about fifteen minutes and then hauled out of the west with an hour of fishing to go. Wind speeds were light, in the four or five knot range. Seas were chops of a foot. We carried this wind all the way home for a very comfortable ride. The air temperature reached a high of about 72F. The tide was moderate to strong in the direction with the wind. So it seemed like a slow drift but if you got stuck on bottom you realized how fast the tide was pulling us. The sky was nearly cloudless all day. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 61.8F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 76F with a low of 62F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 76F (with a low of 56F).

The fishing was excellent, the catching was excellent and landings were very good. We caught a ton of small, sub-legal, pollock, thirty-seven dogfish, thirty-four cod from 5 to 15.5 pounds, twenty-five small cod, sixteen sub-legal haddock, a herring, a wolffish and a mackerel. All those fish were caught and released back to the ocean alive. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. No other species was close (except for the number of small pollock). We caught more legal haddock than small pollock. There were very few sub-legal haddock. Legal pollock were the next most prevalent fish that was kept. Legal landings also included one redfish and forty-six cusk. It was a very busy day.

We might have had one halibut on. But I never saw the strike, the fish on the machine or the angler fighting it. All I know is that Maxwell Collier came down from the bow, where he was fishing to me, in the cockpit, and told me that he had hooked a fish, it headed to bottom, took some line and broke off. It was all I could do to pull line out of his reel. I told him; "Your drag was too tight." He replied; "I didn't even touch the drag!" Of course, that was the problem; he should have set his drag before he started fishing. And, of course, I could have given him some instructions. Never assume the angler knows how to handle his equipment. So was it a halibut? It could have been. I could also have been a big cod or pollock.

We drift fished all day. Only cod flies and jigs were used today. No one used bait.

Fred Kunz (NH) was far and away the high hook today. It was a fish a cast drift for an angler with a jig stick. And Fred is certainly an expert at that. Plus, it doesn't hurt that he wields the most excellent jig stick known to human kind. His largest fish was a 12 pound cod. Some of his other fish included an 11.5 pound cod, an 11 pound pollock, a 10.5 pound pollock and a cod that weighed 10 pounds. Fred also caught a 7 pound Maine state trophy haddock, the minimum acceptance weight for a haddock to attain trophy status in Maine. This is his largest haddock of the season so far. It's also a tie for the Bunny Clark's sixth largest haddock of the season to date. I took a picture of Fred with his big haddock. This digital image appears on the left.

Chris Deschambault (ME) won the boat pool for the third largest fish with the third largest fish, a 15 pound cod. This ties for our fifth largest cod of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Chris also caught the fourth largest fish of the trip with a 14 pound cod. John Andruychak (NJ) won the boat pool for the second largest fish with the second largest fish, a 15.5 pound cod. This is the Bunny Clark's third largest cod of the season to date. John also caught a 13 pound cod. Brad Roche (NJ) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 16 pound wolffish. This is the largest wolffish of the Bunny Clark fishing season so far. Brad also caught the largest pollock of the trip at 13.5 pounds. I weighed another pollock of his that was 10.25 pounds.

Other Angler Highlights: Jonathan Griffin (MA) caught a 10.25 pound pollock that I weighed. He caught three others that were probably as big or slightly bigger that I didn't weigh. Ray Westermann (MA) caught a 13 pound pollock, his biggest fish today. He also caught an 11.5 pound cod and another pollock of 10 pounds. Chris Willy (VT) caught the third largest haddock of the trip. It weighed 5 pounds. Bob Greenly (PA) caught a 7.1 pound Maine state trophy haddock. I took a picture of Bob holding his nice haddock. This digital image appears on the right. John Andruychak landed the hard luck award for catching the most dogfish. He might have actually caught half of all the dogfish that were caught today.

Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Kai Rosenberg ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 57F, the sky was mostly clear, there wasn't enough wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm and the visibility over it was very good. The wind was light all day, out of the south. Wind speeds never got up to ten knots. The ocean along the shore was calm all day. After 5:00 PM, the southerly wind increased to twelve knots or so. This died out later in the evening. The visibility was very good. The sky was clear with few clouds. The highest air temperature that I saw was 76F. There was very little humidity; it was a perfect day overall, a "111" in my father's book. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 63F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 50F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 78F (with a low of 54F).

On the fishing grounds, there was no wind in the morning, the ocean was flat calm. Later, the wind blew out of the south at five to ten knots. Seas were chops of a foot after noon. The air temperature was in the 70s, but hot later in the trip out in the sun. The tide (current) was moderate to strong. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The sky was sunny all day - that and the calm weather made it hot on deck. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F on the fishing grounds.

The fishing was okay. The reason I say this is because the weather was really nice but there were a pile of dogfish. Dogfish tangle, making it frustrating with even just a couple people aboard, never mind twenty people. There was a stronger current than normal. But it wasn't nearly as much of a negative factor as the dogfish. The catching was good to very good, excellent if you included the dogs. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Twenty-five percent of the haddock caught were too small to keep. Legal landings also included eighteen pollock, five redfish, nineteen cusk and three whiting. Released fish included about two hundred dogfish, twelve cod of 5 pounds or more, twenty-four short cod, forty small pollock and a couple of sculpins. Drifting was the only method employed. All terminal gear worked equally well.

I didn't get any information on the anglers who caught the most fish. So he will remain anonymous. Chase Murray (VT) beat his father near the very end of the trip to capture the biggest fish of the trip and win the boat pool. His fish was a 13.5 pound cod, one of the bigger cod that we have seen this season. The second largest fish was caught by Mike Murray (VT), a 13 pound pollock. Mike (Chase's father) has been fishing with me for over thirty years, maybe more. I remember when his sons were just young kids. I remember when Mike was a kid! Mike has always been a very good fisherman. And he likes fishing like I like fishing. The third largest fish was an 11.5 pound cod caught by Jonathan "Griff" Griffin (MA). He also caught a 9 pound pollock.

Chase's older brother, Hunter Murray (VT), caught a 7 pound pollock, his biggest fish. Hunter was also the only angler to get sea sick and ended up winning the hardest luck of the trip award t-shirt. I think he just wanted the shirt, if you want to know what I believe! Cody Baraw (VT) caught a 7 pound pollock. Norm Herrick (MA) caught a 10 pound cusk, this is our seventh largest cusk of the season so far. Jim Blodgett (VT) also caught a big cusk. Jim's cusk weighed 8 pounds.

I was lucky enough to be sponsored again with a $40.00 donation towards my cancer fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today. The donors were Bob Munroe & Linda Burgess (MA), two long time supporters of the cause. They are patrons of Barnacle Billy's. It's always good to see them, as I did today. Thank you both so very much for your thoughtfulness. I certainly to appreciate it!

Thursday, June 30, 2022

Jon Calivas and I (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) ran the marathon trip today.

At 3:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at five knots or so and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent.

Another beautiful was had on the way to the fishing grounds. The wind blew out of the northwest up to almost ten knots, at most. Seas were chops of a foot or slightly more. We also had a short two foot swell from the south that disappeared by the time we got to the grounds. The sky was hazy clear, made so by high cirrus clouds that were much more prevalent at the end of the day. The air temperature was mild and the visibility was nearly excellent.

On the grounds, we had the same northwest wind that never seemed to make it to ten knots but hung on all morning. The wind was much lighter before noon and left us altogether by 1:00 PM. The ocean was calm for a half hour until the wind struck from the west. It struck at a velocity of three knots at most. The air temperature reached a high of about 72F. The tide was moderate to strong in the direction with the wind. The high cirrus clouds became more noticeable near the end of the day which made the lighting soft and was easier on the eyes. The visibility ranged to over twenty-five miles. The highest surface water temperature that I saw was 61.7F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 83F with a low of 67F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 79F (with a low of 52F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing was very good overall. We had more dogfish in the morning than afternoon. But the day wasn't crazy with dogfish. The weather was perfect, the drift was perfect and the current wasn't strong enough in the wrong way to bother us. The catching was fair in the morning, excellent in the afternoon. Landings were very good overall. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Many were in the 3 to 4 pound range. However, forty percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal. When we did get a legal haddock, it was obviously legal. When we caught a short haddock it was smaller than we have seen. Legal landings also included fifty-one pollock, twenty-one cusk, a white hake (our first), four whiting and four mackerel. Released fish included seventy dogfish, six cod of 5 pounds or more, thirteen smaller cod, five cigar whiting and a mackerel. Drifting worked the best but we did try anchoring once. We stayed on one drift for three miles, ending up exactly on the spot I was going to head for next! That has got to be a first! Jigs and cod flies caught the most fish. We did have some anglers using bait but they caught mostly dogfish. And some of the bait fishermen converted to jigs and flies before the end of the trip.

There was no way to tell who was high hook. Most everyone did equally well. Brian St. Saviour (ME) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 14.25 pound pollock. The second largest fish was a 13.25 pound cod caught by David Heckman (ME). David did not enter the boat pool. Joe Breton (ME) won the boat pool for second largest fish with the third largest fish, a 12.5 pound pollock. Joe also caught a 7.25 pound cod, his bag limit of haddock and several pollock that weighed 9 pounds.Three anglers tied for the fourth largest fish at 12 pounds each. Steve Greenlaw (ME) caught a 12 pound cod, Ben Miller (AK) caught a 12 pound pollock and Karen Rybka (ME) caught a 12 pound pollock. Steve didn't enter the boat pool but Ben and Karen shared the boat pool for the third largest fish.

I weighed another pollock for Karen that weighed 10.25 pounds. Steve had another pollock of 9 pounds. Ben caught two pollock of 9.5 pounds and another pollock that weighed 11.5 pounds. Steve ended up winning the hard luck award t-shirt because he didn't enter the boat pool and I knew if I gave him the award, Dave Symes (ME) would abuse him all the way home!

Other Angler Highlights: Dave Symes caught the first and largest white hake of the season today at 9.5 pounds. He also caught an 8 pound cusk. His largest fish was probably a 10 pound pollock that I never weighed. We caught quite a few pollock in that size range today. Twelve year old Dylan Miller (AK) caught a 9 pound pollock, an 8 pound pollock and a 10.5 pound pollock. He also caught a haddock of about 5 pounds that he lost overboard. Kyla Bentz (AK) caught the largest haddock at 6 pounds. I took a picture of her holding her fish right next to eight year old Braden Morrill (NY). This digital image appears on the left. Braden himself caught a double haddock catch that included one that was 2.75 pounds and another that was 3.5 pounds. That digital image appears with his grandfather (Terry Lernihan - VT) in the background, on the right in this entry. Kyla went on to catch the largest double of the day. Her catch included an 11 pound pollock and an 8.5 pound pollock, both on the same line at the same time. I also weighed a 9 pound pollock for her. She plays the #9 position for her soccer team in Alaska and scored forty-nine goals last season! She attributes her success to her running ability. Jim Blodgett (VT) landed an 11 pound pollock, his biggest fish.

I scored a few more donations today to help in my fund raising efforts with the Pan-Mass Challenge today, supporting cancer research in New England. The list of donors and their donations are as follows: Dave & Rebecca Symes for a generous $100.00 in Memory of Mike Kinney's Mother who passed from brain cancer just a week ago, Brian St. Saviour for $5.00, Jim Blodgett for a generous $175.00 and Joe Breton for $25.00. Thank you all so very much for your thoughtfulness and generosity. It is humbling to know so many great individuals and the reason I do what I do. Much appreciated!

Friday, July 1, 2022

We had not enough anglers to allow the Bunny Clark to release the wooden anchors this morning. So we are on the beach again today. There have been too many times where we have been ashore this season!

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was clear, the wind was blowing out of the west at five knots or so and the visibility over the ocean seemed excellent. Ashore, the day was wonderful. The wind blew out of the south again. This seems to be the wind of choice lately. In the morning, the southerly wind blew up to ten knots, increasing in the afternoon. When I went to bed the wind was out of the south at about fifteen knots. The sky was clear all day with some clouds. The visibility was very good. The highest air temperature that I saw was 84F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 92F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 92F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 83F (with a low of 58F).

After we got in off the marathon trip yesterday, the time was up on the engine oil. So I changed the oil and three oil filters with the help of Jon Calivas and Danny Dellamonica. It took me about forty minutes. So, not too long. I needed two more quarts to bring the oil level up to the full mark on the stick. I waited until this morning to do that.

The rest of the day was spent at the restaurant. Friday is my day to open. So I was there from 5:30 AM until 9:00 AM. I came in again at noon, took another break to take a nap and eat dinner and got back at 5:30 PM, the finish at 9:30 PM.

Our border collie, Gill, was diagnosed with cancer at the veterinarian yesterday. Deb had found a mass behind his right leg and had gone in to have it checked. A sample was sent out so the finding isn't conclusive but the dog will have an operation on Thursday. Needless to say, the Tower household has been in a sullen mood.

In the meantime, I received a $50.00 donation from Rebecca & Don Stedman (TN) sponsoring me in this year's Pan-Mass Challenge, a cycling event to support a team of cancer researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. The donation was made "In Memory of our Dear Brother, Jim Stedman". Rebecca & Don have sponsored me for many years. Thank you again, Rebecca & Don. Thank you for your help!

Saturday, July 2, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas (with Danny Dellamonica as apprentice deck hand) ran the day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 75F, the sky was overcast, it was raining, the wind was blowing out of the south at ten knots or more and the visibility over the ocean was good in precipitation and haze. The sky was mostly overcast all morning. We did get a very occasional peek at the sun. But this might have been twice. All the other time it looked like we were going to get showers. That really never happened. What did happen was occasional spitting rain. There wasn't enough rain to get the road wet but you could feel it. At times, you could feel it more and you would think; "Here we go." But the rain never happened. We got all the way until 8:10 PM, when the sky opened up and it started pouring rain. This lasted a half hour. Wind speeds kicked up to over twenty knots in this shower. Everyone who was sitting outside at the restaurant got soaked or nearly so. Most of the afternoon was mostly sunny. The air temperature reached a high, that I saw, of 86F. It was humid but not uncomfortably so. The visibility was good to very good, except in that downpour. The wind was light from the southwest all day. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 87F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 88F (with a low of 66F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 87F (with a low of 64F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten knots or more. Seas were chops of two to three feet. The sky was overcast for the whole time, while fishing. The visibility ranged from a mile in fog to ten miles. The visibility was also marred by light rain during the morning and early afternoon. The air temperature hung in the 70s. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 62F.

The fishing was fair because of the dogfish and the bit of chop that was there all day. The catching was good to very good, excellent if you included the dogfish. Landings were good. Most legal fish landed were haddock, again, by far. About forty percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal and had to be released. Legal landings also included six pollock, five cusk, six whiting and fifteen mackerel. Released fish included over two hundred dogfish, nine cod of 5 pounds or more, four small cod, forty-five sub-legal pollock and a couple mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear (baited hooks, flies & jigs) worked well.

Either Hal Flanagan (MA) or Tim Rozan (ME) were high hook with the most legal fish. It was too close to call. You could say that Tim was the fisherman of the day as he also won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8 pound cod. Hal caught the largest haddock of the trip with a fish that weighed 6 pounds. The second largest fish was a 7.5 pound cod caught by Alex Alperstein (DC). Keith Edwards (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 7 pound pollock.

Interestingly, Keith Edwards landed the hard luck award for hooking into two small bluefin tuna and losing both of them and both jigs that he was using that hooked them! One tuna was so close to the boat that it could have easily been harpooned. The problem was that it happened so fast that Ian didn't have time to even think of getting the harpoon out (the fish was also mis-identified as a shark in the beginning) and it wasn't in gaffing range before it broke off, even though Ian did have the flying gaff in hand.

Other Angler Highlights: Darlene Chin (VT) caught a 4 pound haddock, her largest fish and a good looking haddock. Ross Schneider (ME) landed a 4.5 pound Maine state trophy whiting. This is the largest whiting of the fishing season so far by a pound. It's also tied for the fifth largest whiting all time caught on the Bunny Clark in the last forty years. Ian took a picture of Ross holding his trophy fish. This digital image appears on the left.

Captain Ian Keniston and Jon Calivas ran the afternoon (4 PM to 8 PM) half day trip. On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at ten to five knots. Seas were chops of a foot over a two foot short swell generated by the wind earlier in the day. The air temperature was the same as it was during the day trip. The visibility ranged to fifteen miles in haze. The tide was moderate. The sky was a mix of sun and clouds. The surface water temperature remained at 62F.

The fishing was very good. The catching was fair. Landings were poor. The only legal fish caught were whiting. There were eight. Released fish included three short cod, a sub-legal haddock and twelve dogfish. Drifting was the method. Only bait and cod flies were used.

Carlos Santana (QC) - and, yes, that is his real name - won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, a 3.5 pound cod. The second largest fish was a 1.5 pound whiting caught by Cici Andrews (NY). Kirby Smith (MA) caught the third largest fish, a 1.25 pound whiting.

Other Angler Highlights: Todd Smith (MA) caught a 1 pound cod. Nathaly Motiuk (QC) landed the hard luck award for being the most sea sick. Ouch!

I received another donation from Tim Rozan sponsoring me in the Pan-Mass Challenge, my cancer research fund raising cycling event. The donation was for $81.00. Tim has been very generous to me over the years. Thank you so much. I very much appreciate your support!

Sunday, July 3, 2022

Captain Ian Keniston and Danny Dellamonica ran the extreme day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 64F, the sky was overcast, the roads were dry, the wind was blowing out of the west northwest at six knots and the visibility over the ocean was very good. There was some haze but there wasn't much. The sky remained overcast until probably 9:00 AM? From that time on, the sky was sunny with few clouds. The wind was light from the south all day. I don't believe that we had as much as seven knots at the peak of the wind. The ocean along the shore remained calm. The visibility was very good to excellent. There was very little humidity. The highest air temperature that I saw was 85F. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 86F with a low of 71F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 84F (with a low of 56F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 85F (with a low of 61F).

On the fishing grounds, the wind blew out of the southwest at five knots or more. The ocean was calm all day. The air temperature reached a high in the 70s. The visibility ranged to over twenty miles. The tide (current) was moderate. The surface water temperature reached a high of 64F.

The fishing was fair only because of the dogfish that were getting in the way of catching the desired species. The weather was really perfect for anglers. The catching was good. Landings were good as well. Most legal fish landed were haddock, by far. Thirty percent of the haddock caught were sub-legal. Legal landings also included sixteen pollock, ten redfish, eighteen cusk, a whiting and eleven mackerel. Released fish included about one hundred and fifty dogfish, twelve cod of 5 pounds or more, about twenty-five short cod, fifty sub-legal pollock and two mackerel. Drifting was the method. All terminal gear worked well.

Silas Amlaw (NY) was high hook with the most legal fish. Kenny Harless (OH) won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound pollock. It was the first fish of the day that Ian started to weigh for the boat pool. The second largest fish was 8 pounds. Two anglers caught fish that weighed 8 pounds. Sean Devich (SC) caught one, an 8 pound cod. Thomas Hunt (NY) caught another, also and 8 pound cod. Thomas also caught a 7 pound pollock. Sean's second largest fish was a 7.5 pound pollock.

Other Angler Highlights: Zach Freitas, Jr. (CT) caught a 7 pound cod, his largest fish. Katie Cameron (ME) landed the hard luck award for being the only angler to be affected by the motion of the ocean.

Independence Day, Monday, July 4, 2022

As was true of Independence Days of the past, we have no anglers for today's trip and no interest. So, just as we did last year, the Bunny Clark's wooden anchors are out yet again.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 61F, the sky was mostly clear with scattered clouds, there was hardly enough wind to blow a candle out, the ocean along the shore was mottled with wind patches in between calm slicks and the visibility over it was excellent. The sky was sunny all day, another "111" as my father would say. There was little humidity with a high air temperature of 83F. The sky was clear and sunny with some clouds. The wind blew out of the west northwest at five knots or so. (Offshore it was southwest up to ten knots, backing out of the north northwest in the late afternoon.) Inshore or offshore, I don't believe there was even ten knots of wind today. The visibility remained excellent. In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 85F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 82F (with a low of 49F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 82F (with a low of 54F).

I worked at the restaurant for an hour after editing yesterday's fishing report from 4:00 AM. By 7:30 AM, I was on the road with my bicycle headed for Kennebunk where I met a few cyclists from the Maine Coast Cycling Club for our annual July 4th ride. I was back home after 62 miles. It was an easier than normal pace and a lot of fun.

I had planned to run the fireworks cruise on the Bunny Clark this evening until Deb reminded me that we had a fishing trip that I was to run tomorrow. Taking the cruise and getting three hours of sleep before a fishing trip was not in my best interest. So I canceled it and called the few disappointed individuals who I had invited. Most, if not all, knew the problem I had and were sympathetic. I was a bit disappointed that I hadn't realized the whole scene.

I worked the restaurants (Barnacle Billy's) from noon until about 5:30 PM. From that time on I spent my time getting the boat ready for tomorrow's trip. It was a great day with many returning patrons to talk to. That and working with my son, Micah, who is managing Barnacle Billy's, Etc., made my day.

Gill hasn't been exactly the same since the Doc put him on steroids to bring shrink the tumor. Of course, we haven't been the same either. But the dog seems more needy and a bit tired? I keep thinking that maybe I'm reading more into it than is actually there. But I guess when you are concerned you might see things that you wouldn't otherwise. I'm cautiously optimistic. I'm not looking forward to the surgery on Thursday.

Tim Tuesday, July 5, 2022

Not a soul on yesterday's trip. Today we are full with more anglers wishing they could go! I can't figure it. Jon Calivas and I ran the full day trip today.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 60F, the sky was mostly clear with high thin clouds, there was not enough wind to write about, the ocean along the shore was calm with occasional wind patches and the visibility over it was excellent.

Heading out to the fishing grounds was a joy. There was no wind, the ocean was glassy calm, there was plenty of visibility and I had a great group of anglers aboard.

On the grounds, the wind stayed light all day. When we were able to establish a wind direction it was out of the south. That happened at about mid morning. The wind velocity produced just a ripple on the surface of the ocean. We did have a long rolling sea swell from the southeast. It might have been a two foot roll, maybe higher. But the time between the swells was so long as to not even seem like we had a swell at all. We might have had five knots of wind on the ride home, maybe. The tide (current) was strong today which eliminated drifting as an option. Clouds started to take over the sky. The sky was overcast before we headed home. The visibility dropped as well in a haze that just seemed to form and get worse. I don't believe that we could see land until we got about six miles from it headed in. It started to rain just as we were approaching the gate (can buoys) at 2:45 PM. The air temperature reached 70F, perfect t-shirt weather. The surface water temperature reached a high of 63F.

Ashore, these were the air temperatures in selected New England cities: In Boston, Massachusetts (Logan International Airport) the high was 80F with a low of 66F). Concord, New Hampshire's high temperature was 74F (with a low of 58F). The high air temperature at the Portland International Jetport, Portland, Maine was 79F (with a low of 57F).

The fishing was very good if you didn't include the dogfish. The dogfish made it so much less so. The catching was good, very good if you included the dogfish. Landings were fair. Legal landings included fourteen haddock, seven pollock, a redfish of almost trophy size, thirty-four cusk and a whiting. Released fish included too many dogfish to count (over a hundred), one cod of about 5 pounds, eight sub-legal haddock, five small pollock and a sculpin. Drifting was much to fast to fish using this method. Anchoring was perfect with the lines straight down. Only bait and cod flies were used. There were no jigs used today.

Tim Tardiff (VT) was the fisherman of the day. He was high hook with the most legal fish and he won the boat pool for the largest fish with the largest fish, an 8.5 pound cusk, the first fish to be boated today. Very shortly afterward, he caught an 8 pound cusk that tied with another fish of 8 pounds for the second largest fish of the trip. Ted Begin (NH) caught the other 8 pounder, a pollock. I looked at the pollock in the bow, where Ted was fishing and thought for sure that it was the biggest fish. But that wasn't the case. It was certainly the longest fish of the trip.

Other Angler Highlights: Coop Schell (SC) caught a 7 pound cusk caught on the second stop of the day. Cole Schell (SC) caught the second largest pollock of the trip at 7.5 pounds. Kylie LeBlanc (SC) landed the hard luck award for the simple reason that I couldn't find anyone with any worse luck than anyone else. Everyone was tangled with dogfish at some point during the trip. Kylie just looked like a person to give the hard luck award t-shirt to! I hope she wears it in good humor.

During the early part of the fishing, I noticed that my engine batteries were starting to drop in voltage. A look at noon showing they had gone below 26 volts. I have a twenty-four volt electrical system for the engine completely separate from the house side that runs all my electronics, boat lights, etc. It has been my experience that diesel engines start better under a 24 volt system so I had incorporated this in all my engines with the Bunny Clark. The engine batteries are fairly new. So I suspected that the alternator was not charging the batteries. What I didn't know is how long the batteries would last before the lack of electrical power would shut the engine down. Since the engine is a Tier 3, fully electronic engine, I need power to keep it running, unlike all my diesel engines before it. Actually, talking to Ted Begin gave me confidence to keep going until the end. And since we left the dock fifteen minutes early, we got back in Perkins Cove fifteen minutes early, the batteries showing 25.5 volts upon arrival. So it all worked out.

I had called Deb during the ride in to tell her that I was having problems that I was not sure I could fix between trips. At that time, I assumed that it was an alternator problem but I wasn't sure. So she canceled the afternoon trip that I had been expecting to take. Little did I know at the time that anglers for that afternoon trip were canceling anyway because of the rain. It turns out that I wouldn't have had enough to sail even if I could have fixed the problem quickly.

I also called my son who knows more about engines than I do having gone to school for it. He met me at the dock. As soon as all the fillets were passed out and the anglers had gone, we opened up the engine room hatches and checked the alternators with a multimeter. Sure enough, my 24 volt alternator was not charging. Since neither alternator had been changed since I installed the engine eight years ago, I decided to change out both the 12 and the 24 volt alternators. I always hold two new spares at the house with the pulleys already mounted on them for quick installation. It was just as well that I didn't have them on board with me as I would normally do. Micah changed out both of them while I did little to help but watch and pass him tools occasionally. We were done by 5:00 PM. Another disaster averted.

Glen & Becky Dore (ME) donated $35.00 toward my cancer fund raising project with the Pan-Mass Challenge. Glen is undergoing treatments at Dana-Farber in Boston right now. This is the institute where the researchers work that we support with all this funding. Becky was actually second hook today, I do believe. Thank you so much Glen & Becky. You have already given so much. This makes me appreciate your donation even more!

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Another day where we didn't have enough interest in going fishing on the Bunny Clark. I don't really like a day when she remains ashore.

At 5:00 AM EDT the air temperature was 67F, the sky was overcast, it had been raining for most of the early morning so the roads were wet, there was ten knots of southwest wind blowing at the house and the visibility over the ocean seemed good but it was hazy and I couldn't see Boon Island. More later.

I have decided to keep the fuel surcharge at $15.00 until I get a feeling as to where fuel prices are going to settle in at or if prices rise. I've always put in the literature and online that we would have to ask for a fuel surcharge if the prices went too high. But we have never had to ask for one until this season. I'm hoping it goes away but I'm very ambivalent about future of fuel pricing.

Also, as most of you know, the 2022 season officially started on May 1. The regional office of the National Marine Fisheries Service has not made a ruling as to when the new recreational fishery regulations will go into effect. And after talking on the phone with them near the end of April, they had not decided on what the new ruling should encompass. They will have to decide on the regulations going forward (i.e.: adopt the New England Fishery Management Council's suggestion or come up with a plan of their own that will, no doubt, mirror most of what the Council suggests.) Next, the ruling goes out to public comment, the comment period being as short as fifteen days or as long as a month. And then the decision will go from there. I suspect that we will not see the new regulations come out until at least July 1. By that time, the best haddock fishing will be over and the dogfish will be here (they are here already). The Council's proposal differs in the regulations today by the bag limit of haddock (five more per person under the Council's proposed rule) and for the cod season in the fall (one more week added to the cod season - September 1 thru October 7.). I, of course, would like to see a slot limit on cod so that we don't take too many of the more fecund larger breeding individuals. But no one likes my ideas. And some based their thoughts on the slot as it played out with the striped bass, not a very good comparison - my opinion. So it will be a wait and see. Until the new regulations go into effect, the old regulations will remain in place, including the 15 fish haddock bag limit and four week cod season.










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